The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)
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  The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)
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S019
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« Reply #50 on: July 10, 2022, 09:19:38 PM »

Statement from the Office of the Prime Minister:


It is greatly troubling that war has broken out once again in Europe. The United Kingdom remains committed to ensuring world peace and world stability, as such, I am officially declaring our intention to remain neutral in this war. However, I also ask the leaders of Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Yugoslavia to consider which path they want to take. I would like to remind all of us that the Great War resulted from a minor regional conflict, and we risk falling down the same path if we are going to make war over minor grievances. I urge for all sides to stop this bloodshed and as such, the United Kingdom expresses its support for an immediate ceasefire between the warring parties and for a negotiated peace. The United Kingdom also offers to serve as a neutral arbitrator for any peace talks. Lastly, the United Kingdom will always continue to pray for peace, stability, and prosperity. We look forward to peace once again returning to the European continent.
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GoTfan
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« Reply #51 on: July 11, 2022, 12:23:48 AM »

The demands for peace from the United States and United Kingdom betray a fundamental misunderstanding of the reactionary mind. The reactionary cannot accept the success of other nations, for it draws attention to said failings. The reactionary cannot accept the peace of the people, so they rile up their own population to distract from their own failings. The reactionary cannot accept changes in the world, not accept that the world has left their insane beliefs behind.

The actions of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia are little more than pre-emptive operations to ensure the security of their own nations against the ramblings of a reactionary who longs for the returns of an Empire brought down by the people demanding self-determination. Perhaps President Roosevelt and Prime Minister MacDonald would disavow the Treaty of Versailles as well?

The Soviet Union stands firmly against the reactionaries in Hungary, Germany and Italy. The workers of the world must resist these powers with all their might.
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NewYorkExpress
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« Reply #52 on: July 11, 2022, 12:33:43 AM »

Secretary of War George Dern responds to the Soviet Union at West Point

Need we remind the Soviets that our Senate never ratified the Treaty of Versailles. Technically we already disavowed it, when the Senate refused to ratify it in 1919.

If we wanted to call up a million troops, send them across the Atlantic and North Sea, and land them in Germany, we could, because our Senate never agreed to Versailles, and in my opinion, we should have sided with Clemenceau and been harsher on Germany than Versailles was in the first place!

So, no we don't feel bound by Versailles at all. What we are bound by, is the fact that we are an ocean away, in the middle of an economic depression, unable to intervene without causing great harm to ourselves. If America could step in and break this conflict up, rest assured we would.
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Lumine
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« Reply #53 on: July 12, 2022, 12:28:18 AM »

End of 1933



In the News:

TIME PERSON OF THE YEAR: Admiral Miklós Horthy
NOBEL PEACE PRIZE: Sir Norman Angell

The German Winter of Violence
Reichstag burned down, Hugenberg leads crackdown on NSDAP,
Hitler commits suicide, Germany rocked by street fighting

After spending the first half of 1933 wielding the Reichswehr and conservative militias as an instrument to smash the paramilitary organizations responsible for much of Germany’s political violence, Chancellor Hugenberg’s authority was significantly weakened by the reaction from the Reichstag. Lacking a majority, the conservative deputies were consistently outmatched by a hostile – if completely disunited – KDP-SDP-NSDAP majority, which paralyzed the government and overturned all attempts by the Chancellor to invoke Article 48 and govern by Presidential decree. With the “negative majority” in the Reichstag fully intending to pressure Hugenberg into an election, the three parties held their ground. Hugenberg, for his part, made significant moves in terms of strengthening his party and his own position, but remained unable to pass his agenda and deliver on some of the promises made to would-be allies.

All of this changed on November 15th, 1933. That night, the people of Berlin woke up to a horrifying and unforgettable sight: The Reichstag building, a symbol of the Reich, was going down in flames. Despite the bravery of the firemen, almost the entire building was consumed by the fire, which, as it immediately became evident, was intentional. With the nation utterly shocked by this act of political violence, a few hours of tension and uncertainty were broken when the Prussian police arrested a handful of SA members, which were subsequently charged with setting fire to the building. Although the SA professed its innocence, Chancellor Hugenberg was quick to denounce the fire as a failed plot to elevate NSDAP leader Adolf Hitler into power, and immediately asked the Reichstag permission to invoke Article 48 to take action.

This, at last, broke through the parliamentary deadlock, as the KPD and SPD temporarily dropped their anti-Hugenberg stance and did not block the Chancellor from acting. With the party about to be outlawed, NSDAP dissident Gregor Strasser led a few dozen deputies in breaking out of the party to form the Social Revolutionary Front (SF), whose existence was not only allowed, but, in the eyes of observers, was even actively encouraged. Subsequently, the Chancellor prevailed upon the President to order the banning of the NSDAP and the arrest of its deputies and leaders, a harsh measure that the Reichstag – perhaps opportunistically so – declined to block. A few days of violence ensued, with the remnants of the SA and pro-Hitler civilians rising in revolt in major cities to take on the police and the Reichswehr.

It soon became clear that months of crackdown – as well as mounting financial troubles – had left the NSDAP too weakened to attempt an actual coup, culminating in a failed and costly attempt to seize Berlin. In the aftermath, and with his forces crumbling, a desperate Adolf Hitler committed suicide, allegedly stating: “It’s over. Germany is doomed.” His surviving followers have split and continued their resistance in hopes of sparking a civil war, with Ernst Röhm’s SA making a last stand in Nuremberg, Joseph Goebbels trying to raise a popular militia in Pomerania, and Hermann Goering flying to the demilitarized Rhineland. It is perhaps Goering – who, after seizing Cologne, has taken its mayor hostage – who poses the most complex challenge, having purposely fled into an area in which the Reichswehr – at least technically - cannot follow.

Whatever sense of calm may have been achieved following the news of Hitler’s death, however, has been undermined by the government’s decision to also redouble the crackdown on the Reichsbanner and the Red Front, reigniting the left-wing opposition to Hugenberg. The SPD has already called for a General Strike to bring down the government, and the KPD is said to be preparing for armed struggle as well.

Third Balkan War
Romania joins Yugoslav-Czech coalition, Budapest nearly surrounded,
Ethnic strife undermines the Little Entente, pacifist protests in Europe

What initially started as a joint Yugoslav-Czech operation to rapidly subdue Admiral Horty’s regime in Hungary has rapidly escalated during the last weeks of 1933, becoming a fully-fledged war – already described by many as a “Third Balkan War” – which threatens to spiral out of control as unforeseen events and consequences take place. Ill-prepared for war due to the limitations imposed by the Treaty of Trianon, Hungary nonetheless experienced a groundswell of patriotic feeling and support for the Admiral, the local population being outraged at what they considered to be an unprovoked aggression. It has become common for volunteers and militias to march across the streets of Budapest and other major cities, arguing that Hungary must never surrender lest it be wiped out of the map for good.

In the military front, the Yugoslav military – flush with resources due to French support and a major American aid package – made a strong, concerted push towards Budapest, successfully overrunning most of southern Hungary. Dreams of immediate conquest, however, were shattered due to a violent Hungarian counterattack, which temporarily stopped the Yugoslav forces partly due to their poor morale and rising internal strife. To the east, the Kingdom of Romania held extensive discussions regarding participation in the war, having to contend with different sets of outside guarantees encouraging different courses of action. In the end, the Cabinet voted narrowly – allegedly, by a single vote – to go to war, enabling the Romanian military to cross into Hungary and occupy Debrecen in the last week of December.

However, it was the Czech military – enjoying far greater morale and a shorter supply route – that accomplished the most, breaking through the small Hungarian military and, save for a route to the south, almost encircling Budapest itself. An attempt to close the siege, however, was defeated on Christmas Day by Hungarian volunteers, which were reported to be inexplicably better armed than in previous days. Also aiding the beleaguered Hungarian cause was the reaction of the Hungarian minorities living in the Little Entente, with protests, defiance and outright sabotage breaking out in Slovakia, Transylvania and the Banat, compromising the Entente supply lines into occupied territory. Still, with the bulk of Hungary already under Entente control, many wonder just how long can Admiral Horthy hold out.

The war has also had unexpected consequences despite having only recently started. For once, the enormous economic cost associated with warfare in the middle of the depression threatens to cripple not only Hungary, but most of the Entente itself (with the notable exception of Yugoslavia, with the US aid package being equivalent to 20% of its annual GDP). For another, it has sparked continent-wide fears of another Great War, causing panic and uncertainty. Whilst the European Stock Exchanges reel and take losses, the first pacifist and anti-war protests have already broken out in cities such as London and Paris, redoubling calls for disarmament and to prevent a new Great War.

Chinese Civil War reignited
Nationwide backlash against Sino-Japanese Treaty, Chiang rebuked by Allies,
Despite success in Xinjiang and Jiangxi, KMT threatened by Hu and Zhang

The signing of the Sino-Japanese Treaty, providing an apparent end to Sino-Japanese hostilities that had grown increasingly violent over the past few years, came as a surprise to the Kuomintang, the Chinese warlords, and indeed, for the Chinese people itself. With the feeling of national humiliation over the Shanghai incident and the occupation of Manchuria still high, the treaty sparked immediate backlash and condemnation towards Generalissimo Chiang, who was widely perceived to have accepted a disadvantageous position. Indeed, uneasy allies such as Hu Hanmin did not waste time in proclaiming the treaty to be “the ultimate humiliation, and an act of treason”, and young warlord Zhang Xueliang – the most personally affected one – accused Chiang of “spineless bowing down to Tokyo”. Unexpectedly, Chiang found vital support from previous rivals such as Wang Jingwei and his left-faction, which believed the Republic of China could not risk full-scale war with the Japanese.

Still, the damage was done. Not only did Zhang and Hu refuse to accept or acknowledge the validity of the treaty, they outright revolted against the KMT, dragging Guangdong and Shanxi provinces with them. Chiang, for his part, resolved to consolidate his power and put down his largest enemies, starting a drive to sway local warlords and moving the National Revolutionary Army into action, assisted by a recent treaty that signaled the arrival of French military advisors. For all purposes, the Chinese Civil War had restarted in spectacular fashion. Chiang’s efforts in the latter half of 1933 would bring decidedly mixed success. On the brighter side, an expedition into Xinjiang successfully restored order in much of the province, driving local warlord Sheng Shicai – recently elevated in a provincial coup - to the verge of collapse. A number of minor warlords also chose to remain loyal and to accept de jure control by the KMT.

On the other, attempts to arrest Zhang and his loyalists in the Manchukuo border failed, allowing the warlord to continue resisting the Japanese and defying the treaty. Matters were made worse by a refusal by northern warlord Feng Yuxiang to cooperate with Chiang, and by Hu Hanmin’s defiant stance from Guangdong. In the end, the main KMT offensive took place in the south against Hu, a major effort that, in spite of early victories, collapsed into an attritional standstill when the elite 19th Route Army, a key KMT formation, revolted against the treaty as well and joined forced with Hu. As a result, and while Chiang retains control over the Nanjing government and the bulk of the NRA, it appears it will take a major effort to counter the latest threats to his dreams of unification.

The December 2nd Incident
Major discontent within the Japanese military despite diplomatic success,
Prime Minister Saito shot dead by Army cadets, Kwantung Army takes the initiative

Perhaps ironically, the fact that the Sino-Japanese treaty was far better received – if not outright celebrated – across Japan was not in itself a guarantee of stability or an antidote against political strife, as later events showed. Although most of Japan’s apparent goals were fulfilled by the treaty, seemingly securing Manchukuo as a vital satellite and a source of economic gains, many officers in the Army resented not only the end of hostilities, but also the controversial Imperial Rescript that seemingly condemned their past military adventures, and which many believed – or chose to believe – had been dictated to the Emperor by the navy or by the politicians. In Manchukuo proper, the Kwantung Army abided by the Sino-Japanese Treaty only in terms of pursuing Zhang Xueliang’s loyalists and enforcing the demilitarized zone against the Chinese, going as far as to launch minor expeditions to establish said zone by force whilst maintaining their own fortifications. Not only that, bureaucrats by Nanjing have reported that the share of profits has been unusually low, leading Kwantung Army officers to accuse the Chinese of embezzling them and trying to blame Japan.

In Japan proper, efficient and competent action by the government seemingly prevented the worst – or the better coordinated - outbreaks of military discontent and violence, but could not foresee the actions of junior officers. During a visit to Kyoto, Prime Minister Saito Makoto was accosted by half a dozen military cadets and stabbed to death on December 2nd, the cadets – seemingly unaligned with the major army factions – proclaiming they had killed the traitor who had “imposed the shameful rescript” on His Majesty. Arrested, they are expected to face trial during the first few months of 1934. Despite the cadet’s calls for the army to rise up and support the Emperor against the “decadent politicians” in what has been described as the “December 2nd Incident”, there has been no seemingly coordinate action after Saito’s murder, but a number of Navy officers and democratic politicians have been targeted in separate attacks, harassment or threats of various kinds.

A New Deal for America?
FDR’s ambitious agenda earns plaudits, but is overshadowed by controversies,
Isolationists rally against White House, demanding resignation of War Secretary Dern

Having despaired over the last four years, American voters elected Franklin D. Roosevelt under the hope of his “New Deal”, an undefined agenda that would allegedly lift the United States out of the depression and back into prosperity. The President certainly wasted little time in getting to work, asking Congress – in which the Democratic Party holds large majorities – to pass what can only be described as historic, if not outright unprecedented legislation that places the new President firmly in the progressive side of the political aisle. Despite a major banking fiasco whose effects continue to undermine confidence in a recovery, massively popular social programs were authorized by Congress, including health insurance, free trade, work programs for the unemployed, a minimum wage, benefits for various groups, regulation of Wall Street, and even expansion of labor rights.

Passing such bills, however, has not come without opposition. Various pro-business groups have denounced many of FDR’s New Deal reforms as unaffordable, extreme or harmful to economic growth, and the economy has suffered due to the resulting lack of confidence. It is not entirely clear how many of these programs will be paid for, with Congress and many Democrats still reluctant to engage in mass deficit spending. More importantly, the conservative-leaning Supreme Court has taken issue with some of the new legislation, particularly with a minimum wage that, according to its critics, may be constitutionally dubious. Cases against the New Deal are expected to be heard as soon as 1934, in what could constitute a major challenge – or vindication – to the President’s agenda.

And whereas many believe such reforms would be enough to maintain FDR’s record popularity at the start of its tenure, observers believe the administration has lost significant popularity and support due to a number of controversial decisions, many of which have alienated specific groups. The Yugoslav aid package, for example, has become a symbol for isolationists of the need to keep America away from European problems, and it has become a rallying cry for the Republican Party – seemingly on its terminal stages – to try and dig itself out of its current hole. Senator William Borah, already ambivalent towards the administration, has turned into a bitter and persistent critic following a failed and unconsented appointment to be “Ambassador to Manchukuo”, which the Senator angrily rejected. Isolationists, while supportive of the Haiti withdrawal, have rallied – alongside German-Americans – against the highly controversial remarks of War Secretary Dern, who suggested the Administration would intervene in Central Europe if it could, and argued Germany should have been treated more harshly by the Treaty of Versailles. Dern has been called a "warmonger", with critics arguing he intends to push President Roosevelt to intervene in Europe.

With the 1934 Midterms coming, and with the President facing increased pressure from the right and now, from the left due to a recent a public feud with Senator Huey Long (D-LA), many wonder if FDR and his New Deal will truly be able to change America for good… and for the better.
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Lumine
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« Reply #54 on: July 12, 2022, 12:28:55 AM »

The Croatian Crisis
Ethnic minorities rally against Balkan War, open defiance in Croatia,
Armed intervention against Ustashe reveals foreign support for Pavelic

Already unpopular outside of Serbia due to his personal dictatorship over the country and the unstable nature of the Yugoslavian state, King Alexander I attracted enormous controversy during 1933 due to his actions, which have, in a somewhat contradictory way, left Yugoslavia more unstable whilst increasing his personal power. The arrival of US economic aid enabled the Monarchy to start funding a safety net for the population, an act which, combined with the creation of an Advisory Council with participation of political leaders from the Kingdom’s ethnic minorities – though not the most important ones, who refused to join – seemed to go a long way into lowering the political and social tension across the country. This promising start, however, was quickly undermined by the sudden invasion of Hungary, an act that, while very popular across Serbia, has proved to be politically toxic in the other parts of the Kingdom.

In Slovenia and Bosnia, this opposition was relatively more muted, limited to resignations from the Advisory Council, a passive resistance to the draft, anti-war rallies and protests, and the occasional act of violence. In Croatia, however, the war was far more bitterly resisted, resulting in a minority of Croatian troops and military officers actually defying orders or taking stances against the invasion. Croatian leader Vladko Macek went as far as to assert the need for Croatian independence in a public speech, calling on Croatians to oppose the war and to continue pressuring Belgrade, a call that Ustashe leader Ante Pavelic – from his exile in Italy – upped by calling for open revolt and civil war. Having already taken notice of the Ustashe, King Alexander ordered a military operation in Croatia to smash the organization. Carefully planned to avoid an escalation of violence, the Yugoslavia military mostly succeeded in destroying a number of Ustashe cells without provoking outright civil war.

However, an unexpected twist took place when a Ustashe warehouse was captured in a raid, in which Yugoslav officers found what they described as evidence of foreign material support for the Ustashe, including high-quality weaponry.

Trade Controversies
Whilst Free Trade proves increasingly popular in the US and Japan,
British and French trade deals cause domestic dissent

Already an issue of controversy and public debate, trade has re-emerged as one of the most politically divisive issues regarding the world-wide depression and the ways to contain it.

Due to the signing of recent economic treaties involving some of the world’s largest economies, economic consequences are already starting to be felt, but they have been pushed into the background due to the more glaring and short-term political implications, which wary from country to country. Japan has perhaps been the nation that has benefited the most, with recent treaties with Britain, France, Italy and the United States easing up importation of goods, and measures to protect farmers protecting the government from major backlash to what promises to be a profitable enterprise. The United States has seemingly also benefited partly due to the unpopularity of the now repealed Smoot-Hawley tariff, with President Roosevelt’s embrace of free trade and low tariffs being one of his better received initiatives.

On the other hand, France and Britain have suffered their most over the trade arrangements signed in 1933, if for different reasons. In the United Kingdom, Prime Minister MacDonald has come under fire by pro-tariff members of the Conservative Party, including key members of the National Government and even the Cabinet – who, nonetheless, have kept disagreements private due to collective responsibility -. More worryingly for the Prime Minister, the Commonwealth has reacted badly to trade arrangements between Britain, Japan and France, arguing they breach a recent commitment by the UK to put the Commonwealth first in terms of tariffs. With Australia taking the lead in terms of criticism, many will look towards South Africa and Canada for their reaction. And, in France, Prime Minister Daladier’s arrangements with Japan, China and Britain have also sparked condemnation from various sectors, including farmers, trade unions, and the far-right, all of which – for very different reasons – call for higher tariffs to protect France from foreign competition.

Daladier’s Balancing Act
French PM battles complex domestic policies, faces coalition dilemma,
Corruption scandals and Balkan War raise political tension

Recent French Prime Ministers have not lasted long while in office, and Edouard Daladier can be satisfied up to a point after managing to celebrate his first year in office, surpassing many of his unsuccessful predecessors. However, it is also clear to observers that the political climate in France is growing more and more unstable, with both domestic politics and the international situation making matters difficult for the wily political operator. Having chosen to resume courting of the SFIO, the ever elusive would-be partner for the Radicals in a proper center-left government, Daladier made headlines by taking on a somewhat populist approach, denouncing the so-called “200 families” that, he alleges, control the wealth of France. This immediately caught the attention of the SFIO, whilst causing immediate tension with the right and constant threats by the AD that the government could be brought down at any moment.

Daladier redoubled his bet, providing the SFIO with a bold offer that, despite being seen as significant progress, SFIO leader Leon Blum has taken his time to examine, refusing to quickly commit to a deal. The PM also made further inroads with the French left after supporting the Soviet Union’s attempt to attain membership of the League of Nations, a goal that was finally achieved near the end of the year. However, matters were made more urgent with the break out of war in the Balkans and French involvement supporting Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia. While the French public is not the least bit favorable to Horthy, fears of another war have given renewed strength to the pacifist movement and fueled anti-war protests, forcing Blum, in turn, to up the ante and raise his demands on Daladier. This instability was further fueled on December by the uncovering of a major corruption scandal surrounding the extremely well-connected embezzler Alexandre Stavisky, who was accused by the police of printing an endless stream of fake bonds supposedly worth millions of Francs, subsequently sold to prominent companies on the advice of politicians and media figures close to Stavisky.

Rather than risk arrest, Stavisky has fled, and the exposure of the scandal by the media has sparked major outrage due to the major names associated with Stavisky, as well as fuel anti-Semitism due to his ethnic origin. Although Daladier has in no way been associated himself, the so called “Stavisky-affair” and the Balkan War further complicate his path, leaving many to question just what the French government will look like in the next couple of months.

Smuts’ Power Play
South Africans stage surprise referendum in South West Africa,
Pro-Annexation victory after campaign dash by PM Smuts

Unsatisfied with the vague status quo of South West Africa, a League of Nations temporary mandate granted to the Union of South Africa, Prime Minister Jan Smuts decided the time was right for decisive action to secure the vast territory for his own nation. Rather than seek international arbitration, Smuts surprised the League of Nations by announcing a referendum was to be held at the end of the year, allowing the inhabitants of the territory to decide between independence or full annexation by South Africa. Smuts himself campaigned hard for annexation, skillfully exploiting the fears of the white population – the only ones with the right to vote – regarding future domination by the black majority. As a result, the Annexation side won with over 80% of the vote, a resounding victory for Smuts that appears to strengthen his case for the League to relent and grant South Africa full control over the region. Thus far, the main dissident voices have come from Ethiopian representatives at the League, who claim that, with the white population being around 7-8%, only a very small minority voted at all.
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« Reply #55 on: July 15, 2022, 02:45:51 AM »
« Edited: July 18, 2022, 08:48:24 PM by Lumine »

Turn II: 1934


Economic Performance:
Empire of Japan: High
Republic of Turkey: High

Soviet Union: Moderate
Czechoslovak Republic: Weak
British Empire: Weak
Republic of France: Weak
Kingdom of Italy: Weak
Republic of China: Weak
Kingdom of Yugoslavia: Weak
Dominion of Canada: Weak
Commonwealth of Australia: Weak

German Reich: Very Weak
United States of America: Very Weak
Polish Republic: Very Weak
Kingdom of Hungary: Very Weak

Popularity:

Emperor Hirohito: High
Regent Horthy: High
Duce Mussolini: High
President Masaryk: High
President Kemal: High

President Roosevelt: Moderate
General Inspector Koc: Moderate
Prime Minister MacDonald: Moderate
General Secretary Stalin: Moderate
Prime Minister Lang: Moderate

Prime Minister Daladier: Low
Chancellor Hugenberg: Low
Prime Minister Bennett: Low
King Alexander: Low

Generalissimo Chiang: Very Low

Mobilization Level:
Total Mobilization: None
War Mobilization: Republic of China, Kingdom of Hungary, Czechoslovak Republic, Kingdom of Yugoslavia, Republic of Turkey
Partial Mobilization: None
Conscription: Republic of France, Empire of Japan, Soviet Union, Kingdom of Italy, Polish Republic
Volunteer Army: United States of America, British Empire, Dominion of Canada, Union of South Africa, German Reich (Imposed by Versailles), Commonwealth of Australia
Demilitarized: None

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« Reply #56 on: July 15, 2022, 02:49:01 AM »
« Edited: July 15, 2022, 10:27:55 AM by Lumine »

German Reich:


Chancellor,

Several weeks of violence following the Reichstag Fire have extended themselves into the winter and your second year as Chancellor, increasingly taking on the outlook of a civil war. While, on the bright side, Herr Hitler is now dead, his followers continue to resist in separate regions and/or cities, and Goering’s escape into the demilitarized Rhineland poses quite a dilemma in terms of his suppression. And, though somewhat defanged after the Reichwehr smashed the paramilitaries, the KPD and SPD pose a vital threat, both in Parliamentary terms, and in their most recent actions: a call for a General Strike by the latter, and the prospect of armed resistance by the former. Understandably, it all makes for a complex political challenge to be overcome, even if your personal authority has been steadily bolstered by events. How will you deal with the NSDAP remnants and your enemies in the left?

Although measures previously introduced by General Schleicher during his term have delivered some relief to the German economy and the public, the utter deadlock in the Reichstag – ongoing even after the arrest of scores of NSDAP deputies – has led to the overturning of almost all your legislative decrees (that depended invoking on Article 48). As a result, the economic paralysis continues, a continued crisis that does not help the government’s efforts to restore some semblance of order as the political struggle continues. Not only that, but landowners, industrialists, the unemployed and the trade unions all demand action – though they violently disagree on what should be done – and the SPD-KPD vow still to block any measures until the government holds a general election. How will you handle the economic front?

Over the past nine years, the Reich and the Polish government have been involved in a trade and customs “war” as a result of conflicting interests and the grievances resulting from the aftermath of Versailles. As a result, the Polish coal industry has been substantially hurt, and the economic impact has been far more significant for Warsaw than it has been for Berlin. On the other hand, after nine years of economic warfare with no end in sight, there are those who have questioned the wisdom of these efforts, wondering if Poland might not prove a valuable partner – assuming such a relationship would be possible – in these fluid, unforeseeable times. How will you conduct the Polish-German relationship? Will the trade war continue?

British Empire:


Prime Minister,

Though celebrated by advocates of free trade – including your former Chancellor, Philip Snowden -, the recent trade agreements signed with Japan and France have caused some bewilderment and even anger in parts of the Commonwealth. Ever since the Ottawa Conference in 1932, they believed Britain had committed itself to a moderate form of protectionism, putting the Commonwealth first and foreign nations last in terms of relaxing trade barriers. Quoting these new arrangements as a breach of that principle, the Australian government has taken the lead in protesting these measures, and there’s significant speculation on whether South Africa, Canada and other Dominions will follow suit in condemning the trade arrangements. How will you handle this delicate situation? Should the government stand their ground, at the potential risk of alienating the Commonwealth?

The government’s commitment to multilateral security and calls for peace in Europe have been well received domestically, but fears continue to grow over the horrific prospect of another European War due to the events in the Balkans. Investors and the stock exchanges have panicked at the idea of Britain being dragged into war, a fear which could complicate efforts to fight back against the effects of the depression. On the other hand, and while pacifist marches – often lead by Labour MP’s – achieve great popularity, a small minority of parliamentarians and public figures take sides: some of the more “hawkish” MP’s calling to support the anti-Hungarian coalition; and media barons like Lord Rothermere take Hungary’s side, denouncing King Alexander I in the process. Facing this veritable minefield, how will Britain handle the Third Balkan War?

Despite the trend towards decentralization, autonomy and even independence across several current or former colonies, an odd exception seems to be developing in North America, in the relatively underpopulated – with only a quarter of a million inhabitants - Dominion of Newfoundland. After their remarkable contributions in WWI, the Dominion has driven itself to bankruptcy and crippling debt due to overspending and endemic corruption, to the point in which a Royal Commission and the Newfoundlander government both have expressed a belief that it will be necessary to suspend Newfoundland’s autonomy – at least temporarily so - and return it to direct rule from London. However, there are those in the Dominion of Canada who might see Newfoundland as a territory that ought to be placed under their control, even if the debt issue makes it more controversial than it otherwise might be. What should be done about Newfoundland?

Republic of France:


After embezzling millions of francs with the apparent support and/or involvement of prominent politicians and media personalities, the infamous Alexandré Stavisky is on the run, the outrage at his brazen crimes, anger against the “establishment”, and the police manhunt all conspiring to create an even more toxic political environment. As the far-left demand heads to roll from the rich and powerful, and the far-right take issue with Stavisky’s ethnicity to push for antisemitism, it is certain that, whatever happens, at least some in France will be unhappy about the outcome of this case. What should be done from the government is not entirely certain either, with some arguing for a hard-line against corruption – even if the downfall of certain figures actually empowers extremist politicians -, and others worried about the prospect of the government being damaged should the revelations of the Stavisky case go in an unexpected direction. What will you do?

Negotiations with the SFIO and Leon Blum progressed nicely in so far as your rhetoric and economic proposals were well received, but they have stalled after Blum – repeating a trick he already played against you a few years ago – raised the stakes. The Socialist leader is still demanding for the Radicals to ditch austerity in favor of deficit spending – toxic to the centrist deputies -, and perhaps more worryingly, to refrain from intervening in the Third Balkan War so as to avoid a European-wide conflict. On the other side of the equation, the moderate right represented in AD is incensed as the SFIO-talks, and threatens to bring down the current ministry by walking out should these negotiations with Blum continue. It is by no means an easy situation to solve, made worse by the political pressure – similar to that faced by MacDonald in Britain – of interests groups who demand an immediate reversal of the recent trade agreements, and an embrace of protectionism. How will you handle such a complex dilemma?

Unlike Britain, the French colonial empire has the comparative advantage of a far more embryonic and limited push for local autonomy and independence. And while this serves as a partial relief at times, there are exceptions to the rule. Damien de Martel, the High Commissioner for the Levant, writes from Syria, which – after a massive revolt in the late 20’s – has recently elected a parliament and a vaguely pro-French President. As the push for Syrian autonomy and independence has not diminished with time – being now represented by a new National Bloc coalition -, de Martel and other colonial officers wonder if it is time to try and pursue an independence treaty in order to pre-empty further troubles in the region. Of course, and much like in British India, what the locals want and what the National Assembly in France are willing to stomach may not necessarily be the same, but is the issue worth exploring? Or should decisions on Syria be postponed while the domestic upheaval is dealt with?

United States of America


Mr. President,

Thanks to the extent of the 1930 and 1932 landslides, the Democratic Party enjoys a strong majority in the Senate, and an overwhelming one in the House of Representatives. And while control of Congress is not necessarily seen as being at risk, party bosses have begun to focus their attention on the November midterms that will take place this year. Although the administration has promoted and pass unprecedented legislation to address the depression, much of it broadly popular, it is also believed that your popularity has taken a hit due to a number of controversies, including the Yugoslavian aid package, the banking closure, and recent sniping between yourself and Louisiana Senator Huey Long. Long, for his part, has started to campaign on his populistic “Share Our Wealth” agenda, and is emerging as something of a rallying point for those who feel you haven’t gone far enough. How will you deal with the midterms, as well as with the balance of power within the party?

To name just a few policies, the New Deal thus far has led the way in trying to provide health insurance, works programs, a federal minimum wage, benefits for the poor and the elderly, and even strengthened powers for organized labor. And while much of these have already passed Congress or are in the process of implementation, there are serious questions about their future in the long term. Prevented from regaining growth due to the banking crisis, it is not altogether clear how the US economy will pay for such an extensive range of social programs, particularly with the Democratic Party divided between those who advocate fiscal conservatism and balanced budgets, and those who would fund the New Deal through deficit spending come what may. The other elephant in the room is the conservative-leaning Supreme Court, which has taken issue with measures such as the minimum wage and is expected to hear cases challenging its constitutionality. How will you fund the New Deal, and how will you confront opposition to it?

Foreign policy has undoubtedly been controversial as of lately, and something of a mixed bag for the administration after one year in office. On the more popular side of the equation are the successful withdrawal from Haiti, resulting in one less long-term commitment for the US. This also applies to the recent trade deals with Japan and the general push for free trade, fueled by the backlash to the Smoot-Hawley tariffs. On the other side, isolationist politicians – including Senator Borah – have emerged as persistent critics of more “interventionist” policies, with aid to Yugoslavia – now a factor in the Third Balkan War – cited, as well as the controversial comments of War Secretary Dern, which have resulted in calls for his resignation. Finally, the Philippines has expressed a willingness to acquiesce to a continued US naval presence, but only during the transition period to independence and not afterwards. What will you do about the Philippines, and in the realm of foreign policy?

Soviet Union


Comrade General Secretary,

Firing incompetent and/or questionable officers has proceeded at a steady pace, the methods for replacement helping to start a process of renewal in the previously bloated bureaucracy at the cost of some discontent within the party and the sacked individuals. Still, the famine has not let go, the start of the second Five-Year Plan receiving priority whilst the collectivization of farms remains at roughly two-thirds of the total, with a third of current farms still resisting it or remaining untouched as of yet. As thousands continue to perish and the risk of exposure to the west grows, officers wonder if the USSR should redouble work on the plan and collectivization regardless of the cost (a so-called “long-term approach”), or take active steps to end the famine, even if it means postponing key policy targets. What should be done?

As of the last few years, the Comintern and its associated parties have stood behind a policy of individual political behavior and a criticism of “social fascism”, which has meant that local Communist parties have also targeted social democrats and liberals as foes, and have tried to exploit the economic downturn to expand their mass appeal. The strategy is still broadly supported, but there are those who wonder what the Communist parties should do given the rapidly changing political situation in countries such as France, Spain, Austria and Germany (particularly the latter two due to the Dollfuss and Hugenberg-led repression). With the Comintern due for a World Congress in 1935, and with Moscow having a key influence in it, what stance will you take? Should the Communist parties continue to battle the social fascists?

Over the past year, and partly due to the consequences of the Sino-Japanese Treaty, the situation in China has grown quite chaotic, with the Chinese Civil War having started to gain the attention of the Foreign Ministry. Previously successful in resisting the Kuomintang, the Chinese Soviet Republic operating out of Jiangxi appears to have an opening to strike a blow against Generalissimo Chiang, although the lack of a border or suitable ports might make it hard to assist it should Moscow desire to do so. There is also the matter of Xinjiang province in the Chinese far-west, where local warlord Sheng Shicai has been recently defeated by KMT units and driven to the brink of collapse, leading to some of his officers to make passionate and urgent overtures to the USSR asking for immediate support. Intervening either to support the Chinese Communists and/or Xinjiang could certainly expand Soviet influence in China, but it would certainly result in permanent conflict with Chiang and the KMT. What will you do?

Kingdom of Italy


Duce,

Naturally, the ongoing Third Balkan War and the perilous scenario faced by Horthy in Budapest is at the forefront of all discussions in Rome, particularly since it’s not entirely clear what Italy ought to do in such a crisis. Boasting one of the largest armies in Europe – at least on paper -, there are many who advocate war against Yugoslavia and the Little Entente to protect Hungary from its destruction, a position also supported by exiled Croatians who urge you to “save their nation” from King Alexander. There are others, of course, who fear the conflict spiraling out of control should other nations join in, even if they deplore the potential scenario of Italy losing its influence and would-be partners in the region. Though action has been taken in terms of the current embargo – which is starting to hurt the Yugoslavian economy - Italian credibility may well be on the line. What will Italy do when it comes to this war?

Following your instructions, Minister Jung has started work on the ambitious economic agenda you have set forward, resulting in a marked rise in terms of state expenditures as social, work and development programs are implemented and expected to yield results – positive or not – before long. This broad mobilization of resources, however, is not without its controversies. For one, while reducing tariffs on Japan is not particularly controversial, many worry about and/or dislike the notion of following the US, France and Britain in their embrace – partial or not – of free trade and lower tariffs. For another, whilst the nationalization agenda is undoubtedly popular, it has also sparked fears among investors, particularly foreign ones. Finally, there is also the issue of how to fund such increasing expenditures, and whether they are compatible with Italy’s comparatively very high spending on the military and in defense.

After eight years of ongoing efforts at influencing the country, including the signing of a defensive alliance, and the comprehensive – if unpopular for the Albanians – treaties of Tirana, and despite a recent overture to King Zog, there is some friction with the Albanian Kingdom. Having been propped by Italian loans, the effects of the economic crisis have damaged the Albanian economy enough that Zog and his government have stopped payment of the loan and its interests, a matter which has irritated many in Rome. This impasse, which has gained greater prominence and notoriety due to the neighboring Balkan crisis, poses an interesting foreign policy dilemma. Is it time to force Albania to bind itself closer to Italy and force repayment of the loan, even through other means of payment? Or should something more akin to a partnership be sought? What should be done about Albania?

Empire of Japan


Your Majesty,

Due to the December 2nd Incident, Admiral Saito is now the second consecutive Prime Minister to be assassinated, in both instances by disgruntled junior military officers. While the culprits are tried – in what could well be a repeat of the similar trial for Inukai’s killers – you now face the dilemma of having to appoint yet another Prime Minister. With the Navy worried about taking on the challenge again, Minister of War Araki is now pressuring – on behalf of the Army and also the Kodoha faction – for a General to be appointed to the post. Although it goes unspoken, Araki seems to be implying a desire for the position. You could also try to appoint a politician to reverse the trend towards military-led government, or, perhaps, even consider bringing in a member of the Imperial family. Who should become the new Prime Minister?

The signing of the Sino-Japanese Treaty was generally seen as a triumph for the Japanese position in China, and a guarantee that Manchukuo – now recognized by several nations, including the US – may be here to stay after all. There are, however, complains and concerns levied by the Kwantung Army, which claims that Zhang Xueliang’s continued resistance could well be interpreted as a sign of Chinese bad faith, and ought to be addressed with further punitive expeditions. Some Kwantung officers have also responded angrily to Chinese claims regarding the profit sharing scheme, denying that the transferred funds have been low and accusing the Chinese themselves of embezzlement. All in all, not the most enviable of situations to be addressed. Should the Sino-Japanese Treaty be respected as it stands, and what instructions should the Kwantung Army receive?

Domestically, Japan has seemingly scored a coup through its expansion of trade with North America and Europe, coupled with a politically successful – if economically costly - approach towards lessening its impact among the farmers. However, there has been significant controversy from the Diet regarding talk of collective bargaining and trade unions, the mere idea of which has been readily denounced by the Zaibatsu, as well as by the legislative majority held by the conservative Seiyukai. The liberal Minseito has been lukewarm at best, and only the socialist Minshuto – which only fields 3 deputies – has embraced the idea. As a result, the measure does not appear likely to garner consensus, barring further action to bolster it. A couple of advisors have also floated the idea of an early election to get rid of the present Diet altogether so the next one can address such issues. What will you do?
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« Reply #57 on: July 15, 2022, 02:51:37 AM »
« Edited: July 18, 2022, 08:53:59 PM by Lumine »

Republic of China


Generalissimo,

Partly due to the backlash surrounding the Sino-Japanese Treaty, the Chinese Civil War has reignited, opening up several new fronts in what amounts to a new challenge to your leading position in the government. To the south, Hu Hanmin leads Guangdong to rebellion alongside the traitorous 19th Route Army. To the north, Feng Yuxiang and Zhang Xueliang have joined forces to both continue resisting the Japanese in Manchuria and rebel against your rule. And then there’s the Jiangxi Soviet, ever a threat, with preparations for an offensive having just been completed as the army continues its process of modernization with encouraging results. How should military affairs be conducted? With any of three foes be focused upon? Will you fight them all to prevent anyone else from stepping in?

Among the many issues plaguing China, many have started to notice the growing apathy and perceived “lack of morality” among much of the population under KMT control. Despite the influence and legacy of Dr. Sun Yat Sen, it is not entirely clear to most ordinary Chinese what the party and the Nanjing government stand for, and whether there’s a coherent set of beliefs – or an ideology – to be found. Many – including Wang Jingwei, temporarily turned into an ally – have come to believe China would benefit from a more ideological approach to improve on the many weaknesses the current system has, though there are those who argue that the war and the need to lift the country out of misery make ideology a secondary – or pointless – concern. Will you be pursuing any action on this front?

The Sino-French treaty has been successfully implemented thus far, with limited railroad construction starting and French officers making an impact of their own on the NRA. Economic benefits are yet to truly show up to the Guangdong rebellion and the fact that the Japanese will not leave Shanghai until a couple of years, but the experience has led some to take a greater interest in foreign arrangements and partnerships despite the usual isolationism or nationalism found in the KMT. While, for the most part, those officers or politicians are thinking of deepening the Sino-French partnership, others look elsewhere. Some economically minded individuals are urging a rapprochement with Britain or the US to gain assistance and counter Japanese influences. Others are tempted to look towards Japan as a future partner, in spite of public backlash. And, as Mussolini takes greater prominence, even a Fascist-aligned group has been formed – the Blue Shirts Society – calling on the KMT to embrace Fascism and find long-term help. How will you address the issue?

Czechoslovak Republic


Mr. President,

The Czechoslovakian Republic is at war. Thus far, the Czechoslovak Army has proved itself to be the better trained and armed force out of the Little Entente, as well as the most motivated – by far – in the mission of bringing Hungary to heel and prevent further aggression. Still, there are decisions to be made on the war front. On one side, it remains unclear what Germany and Poland – despite being distracted by domestic politics – will do about the war. On another, the opposition of the Hungarian minority within Slovakia (numbering well over 600k people) is hurting the supply lines into occupied Hungary, an issue that needs to be addressed. And, more importantly, the Czechoslovak Army is on the verge of surrounding the enemy capital of Budapest, opening the question of how to capture the city. Should it be put under siege until it surrenders, at the risk of lengthening the war? Should it be assaulted and bombarded, perhaps at the risk of international outrage? How will you conduct the war?

Contrasting to the superior Czechoslovakian morale is the state of the economy as the nation goes to war. Unlike Yugoslavia, spared from its immediate effects due to an availability of funds, the state finances are already starting to feel the impact from the sudden declaration of war and the mobilization of the army. This, at a time in which unemployment remains high and growth stagnant, sparking speculation on how long can a war be fought until external financial assistance becomes necessary. From the government, Prime Minister Jan Malypetr has suggested undertaking emergency measures and bypassing parliament if need be, as well as the prospect of reparations on Hungary to force to pay for the war. How will you handle the economic front?

Kingdom of Hungary


Regent,

Hungary is at war! Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia have struck against Hungary with what the public considers to be the flimsiest of excuses, and Romania joining in has only further enraged Hungarians within the nation and those who are forced to live under Entente rule. Your popularity, at least for now, has skyrocketed as a result of being a war leader, and millions of Hungarians take to the streets to volunteer or are enlisted as conscripts to fight. More is sky high, but ammunition and supplies are not, and the lack of experienced men puts Hungary at an enormous disadvantage. To make matters worse, Budapest is almost surrounded, and the three Entente armies converge from different directions, leaving the Austrian border as the last lifeline connecting you to the rest of the world. It’s an unenviable situation, but as the Polish proved fifteen years ago, survival is not impossible even in the most difficult situations. How will you conduct the war?

Regardless of how well Hungarians fight and resist, it is clear to most that the survival of the nation depends on international assistance. However, it is not altogether clear who might be willing – or able – to intervene and offer support. Some look towards Dollfuss in Austria as well as the Italian Duce as the obvious options, particularly after Mussolini sanctioned Yugoslavia. Others place hope in Germany and Poland despite their internal strife, wondering if their territorial claims or interests against Czechoslovakia might not be of use. Others still try to consider every avenue, however unlikely, and there’s even talk at the Foreign Ministry of reaching out to the League of Nations, the British, and perhaps even to President Roosevelt in Washington. Where will you seek help, and will you be able to gain support for Hungary before it’s too late?

Kingdom of Yugoslavia


Your Majesty,

Yugoslavia is at war, and despite an early setback the situation is more promising than not. Still, there are issues that will need addressing if the Little Entente is to prevail. These include the low morale of the Yugoslav Army, which is hampering operations; the rioting by the Hungarian minority, compromising supply lines; the Italian sanctions, which combined with the cost of the war threaten to eat through the US aid far quicker than expected; and, of course, how operations against Hungary itself should proceed, ranging from those officers who push for the dash to Budapest for a quick end, to those who’d rather advance slowly and secure the territory. It will be quite a test for you as commander in chief, as your military prestige – a product of an excellent performance in the Balkan Wars and the Great War – will be under scrutiny. How will you try to secure victory for Yugoslavia?

Despite the somewhat promising start of the advisory council, the start of the Third Balkan War appears to have accelerated the ethnic and political strife within the nation, ranging from rioting and open defiance in a Croatia on the brink of civil war, to the general animosity in Slovenia and Bosnia. Although you have struck a blow against the Ustashe without worsening the situation, their leaders are in exile and it is now clear at least one foreign power appears to be supplying them with weapons, an act that could enable them to continue their struggle. Not only that, the pressure for autonomy from the ethnic minorities – and in the case of Croatia, of independence itself – remains at odds with the staunch Serbian support for a centralized, Serbian-dominated state, a dilemma that could befuddle the most accomplished statesmen. How will you keep Yugoslavia together in such a critical moment?

Polish Republic


General,

First Marshal Pilsudski is dead. With him an era truly ends, for it was he who charted a steady and stable course for the new independent Polish Republic, and it was he who led it to a most unlikely victory against the Soviets. Having been very recently – and unexpectedly – chosen as Pilsudski’s heir, you have become Inspector General of the Armed Forces and Minister of War. Still, you are not yet at the top of political power, and must navigate the internal divisions within Pilsudski’s Sanation movement. To the left you have influential politician Walery Slawek, eyeing the premiership, and willing to reach out to the opposition. At the center you have President Ignacy Moscicki, a moderate keen to preserve the Sanation regime. At the right you have General Edward Rydz-Smigly, representing the more authoritarian, nationalist and anti-Semitic elements. These are troubled waters that you’ll have to navigate if you are to dominate Poland. How will you handle your ascension to power?

Aside from domestic issues, recent developments in Europe – as well as the start of the Third Balkan War – raise the question of Poland’s foreign allegiances and partnerships. Pilsudski consistently favored playing the Soviets and the Germans against each other to keep them at an equal length, a stance only recently modified following a non-aggression treaty with Stalin, and a successful diplomatic stance against Germany over Danzig, both of them two years ago. There is also the matter of the Polish claims on Czechoslovakia, which remain unsolved. And, of course, the ongoing standoff with Lithuania, a source of mutual distrust. Although you don’t have absolute control over foreign policy – yet – your voice will certainly be decisive. How should Polish foreign affairs be conducted post-Pilsudski?

Republic of Turkey


Your Excellency,

Yen years after taking office as President, the new state of Turkey is almost unrecognizable compared to the old days of the Ottoman Empire. Indeed, you are personally credited with launching a strong agenda of social, economic and political reform, leading to sweeping social changes. Recently the issue of social and national cohesion has gained prominence within the political discourse, with it being argued that Turkey must do more to assimilate minorities and secure the full “Turkification” of the country. As a result, proposals have been raised from the legislature to restrict languages other than Turkish, and to forcibly relocate minorities to Turkish speaking villages to accelerate assimilation. How will you handle this issue?

One of the consequences of the Treaty of Lausanne has been the demilitarization of the Bosporus and the Dardanelles, as well as the obligation to allow for unrestricted naval traffic. A humiliating imposition, the rising tension within the European continent has led military officers to express their concern, suggesting that Turkey must regain sovereign control over the Straits in order to effectively protect itself against any foe. However, barring unilateral action that could cause a crisis, the only way to address the issue would be to renegotiate Lausanne and/or receive the support of the leading European powers, including nations with a strategic interest like the British or the Soviet Union. Will you seek the remilitarization of the Straits and the revision of Lausanne?  

Dominion of Canada


Prime Minister,

Your government has successfully pushed the tariff increase through the House of Commons despite the bitter opposition of Mackenzie King’s Liberals, who continue to advocate for free trade. Still, the tariff issue has gained salience after the controversial British trade deals that lowered tariffs, sparking a protest from Australia. It is also clear that the tariff controversy and the current collapse of the Newfoundlander dominion government will test Canada’s relationship with the UK, and that voters, who are to go to the polls next year to deliver a verdict on your government, will be looking to your reaction. Aside from tariffs, many Conservative MP’s remain concerned over the high rate of unemployment and the sluggish recovery, reigniting the internal debate between those who want to stay the course, and those who want a bold economic policy, drawing inspiration from leaders like Roosevelt and Mussolini. How will your government handle these issues?

Union of South Africa


Prime Minister,

Criticism from a few isolated malcontents aside, the South West Africa referendum has been a resounding success, giving your government a clear justification to attempt the annexation of the region. However, your Cabinet wonders how exactly you should proceed. Should negotiations be conducted with the League of Nations or with London over the issue? Should unilateral annexation be enacted, at the risk of backlash? Should South Africa court other nations for recognition to strengthen its case? Aside from this, the issue of trade is also on the news due to the recent British trade deals, which have caused discontent in the Commonwealth. Due to your prestige, many will be interested in your stance, and on whether you’ll provide political cover to Prime Minister MacDonald or attempt to lead the Commonwealth opposition to lower tariffs with foreign nations.

Commonwealth of Australia


Prime Minister,

You have just been elected into office - with the smallest of majorites - following a shock victory by your Australian Labor Party against Joseph Lyons. Although Australia has seemingly moved on from the worst moment of the depression, the economic outlook remains grim and is seen as your biggest priority. Unemployment remains staggeringly high, there is still a budget deficit, and Australia is also forced to pay significant amounts in overseas debt to Britain, at a time in which recent British trade deals - which counter previous committments to Commonwealth protectionism - have sparked anger among the voters. On the bright side, the desperate masses are looking for a savior, and if you play your cards right, you may just become the man for the job. What will you do?
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« Reply #58 on: July 15, 2022, 08:59:04 AM »
« Edited: July 16, 2022, 05:05:23 PM by NewYorkExpress »

Roosevelt responds to Secretary of War Dern's comments, Baltimore, Maryland

Secretary Dern made a pretty huge mistake in his speech last month at West Point. He said we could land troops in Germany right now. Germany is not currently a power that is at war with anyone, and as such, we will be doing no such thing. As such, I have requested Secretary Dern's resignation from office.

Should Dern agree to resign, I have offered to appoint aviator Charles Lindbergh as Secretary of War in his place, and that nomination will be submitted to the Senate.
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« Reply #59 on: July 15, 2022, 09:03:15 AM »

President Roosevelt has asked Congress to pass a raise in the income tax, to 50% of total income for all individuals making more than $500,000 per year and 75% of total income of all individuals making more than $750,000 per year.
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« Reply #60 on: July 16, 2022, 05:00:42 PM »
« Edited: July 16, 2022, 07:15:33 PM by KaiserDave »

A MOTION
To the League of Nations



The League of Nations resolves

To CONDEMN the Kingdom of Yugoslavia for resolving to commit a war of aggression against the Kingdom of Hungary

To CONDEMN the Kingdom of Yugoslavia for acts of war and aggression against a country which committed no provocation against it

To CONDEMN the Kingdom of Yugoslavia for dishonestly fabricating evidence of a Hungarian attack to justify a war of aggression

Duce and Prime Minister Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini







In light of continuing aggression by the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, the tyrant Alexander I, and her allies against the Kingdom of Hungary, the Kingdom of Italy resolves to take stronger action against the conspiracies of aggression of Yugoslavia.

The Kingdom of Italy will tighten and strengthen economic sanctions against Yugoslavia in collaboration with the United Kingdom.

The Kingdom of Italy will impose an arms blockade in the Adriatic, enforced by the Regia Marina to stop all weapons and war material shipments to Yugoslavia to encourage an end to the conflict and protest the aggression against Hungary. The blockade will be lifted once the attacking armies withdraw from Hungary and the people of Hungary are allowed to choose their leaders unhindered.

Duce and Prime Minister Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini

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« Reply #61 on: July 16, 2022, 06:02:30 PM »

Quote
Franco-Polish Alliance of 1934
THE Polish Government and the French Government, both desirous of safeguarding, by the maintenance of the treaties which both have signed or which may in future be recognized by both parties, the peace of Europe, the security of their territories, and their common political and economic interests, have agreed as follows:

1. In order to coordinate their endeavours towards peace the two Governments undertake to consult each other on all questions of foreign policy which concern both States, so far as those questions affect the settlement of international relations in the spirit of the treaties and in accordance with the Covenant of the League of Nations.

2. If, notwithstanding the sincerely peaceful views and intentions of the two contracting States, either or both of them should be attacked without giving provocation, the two Governments shall take concerted measures for the defence of their territory and the protection of their legitimate interests within the limits specified in the preamble.

3. The two Governments undertake to consult each other before concluding new agreements which will affect their policy in Central and Eastern Europe.
X Prime Minister Daladier
X Joseph Paul-Boncour, Foreign Minister
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« Reply #62 on: July 16, 2022, 06:08:10 PM »

Quote
Franco-Polish Alliance of 1934
THE Polish Government and the French Government, both desirous of safeguarding, by the maintenance of the treaties which both have signed or which may in future be recognized by both parties, the peace of Europe, the security of their territories, and their common political and economic interests, have agreed as follows:

1. In order to coordinate their endeavours towards peace the two Governments undertake to consult each other on all questions of foreign policy which concern both States, so far as those questions affect the settlement of international relations in the spirit of the treaties and in accordance with the Covenant of the League of Nations.

2. If, notwithstanding the sincerely peaceful views and intentions of the two contracting States, either or both of them should be attacked without giving provocation, the two Governments shall take concerted measures for the defence of their territory and the protection of their legitimate interests within the limits specified in the preamble.

3. The two Governments undertake to consult each other before concluding new agreements which will affect their policy in Central and Eastern Europe.
X Prime Minister Daladier
X Joseph Paul-Boncour, Foreign Minister

X Adam Cox
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« Reply #63 on: July 16, 2022, 07:27:59 PM »

Quote
American-Japanese Industrial Development and Investment Treaty

Quote
With the power vested in our duly appointed representatives, the United States of America and the Empire of Japan agree to the following:

Development

A. The United States of America, through public and private channels, shall invest $100 million in capital equipment for Japanese industrial development.

B. The Empire of Japan agrees to prioritize the importation of American finished goods, including but not limited to cars, radios, aircraft components, and other such similar goods.

C. The Empire of Japan shall make similar investments in American port facilities in Los Angeles, Long Beach, and San Francisco.

D. The United States agrees to prioritize the importation of Japanese cloth, soybeans, and rice.

E. This agreement shall take effect on February 1st, 1934.
X Katsuji Debuchi, Japanese Ambassador to the United States, duly appointed representative of the Empire of Japan
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« Reply #64 on: July 16, 2022, 07:54:20 PM »

The Soviet Union extends its support to the Franco-Polish agreement, and reaffirms its commitment o the non-aggression pact signed with the Republic of Poland

I also wish to declare that as of today, the Soviet Union is extending offers of security guarantees to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, Kingdom of Romania, and Republic of Czechoslovakia against foreign intervention in their ongoing struggle. Fascism, that inherently regressive ideology bent on the oppression of the workers, must be strangled in its cradle.
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« Reply #65 on: July 16, 2022, 08:27:23 PM »


Quote
American-Japanese Industrial Development and Investment Treaty

Quote
With the power vested in our duly appointed representatives, the United States of America and the Empire of Japan agree to the following:

Development

A. The United States of America, through public and private channels, shall invest $100 million in capital equipment for Japanese industrial development.

B. The Empire of Japan agrees to prioritize the importation of American finished goods, including but not limited to cars, radios, aircraft components, and other such similar goods.

C. The Empire of Japan shall make similar investments in American port facilities in Los Angeles, Long Beach, and San Francisco.

D. The United States agrees to prioritize the importation of Japanese cloth, soybeans, and rice.

E. This agreement shall take effect on February 1st, 1934.

xFranklin Delano Roosevelt, President of the United States of America
x Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, United States of America

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« Reply #66 on: July 16, 2022, 09:42:11 PM »


Speech of IL DUCE
Delivered Over the Radio



Men and women of Italy! The Red Barbarian is knocking on the door of Europe. Today the Georgian Butcher Stalin has announced so called "security guarantees" for the criminal rulers of Czechoslovakia, Romania, and the decadent Serbian elite who rule in Belgrade. This means these nations are now under Soviet protection. The Soviet Red Army, who were valiantly defeated by Catholic Poland in 1920, threatens war to defend these criminals. They want to join in on the massacre of the Magyars. This represents an assault of the foundations of Europe! It is an attack on civilization! Stalin proclaims a war against the sublime fascism, this is nothing less than an attack on all nations of Europe who reject the Marxist lie. All civilized nations of Europe must stand together against this threat!

The rulers of Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Yugoslavia are highly suspect for accepting the support of Stalin, the grandmaster of international communism. Stalin, who even now is plotting to deploy armed Bolshevik militants against the civilized nations of Europe. We told the Romanians not to join this war, we promised them we would defend them against the aggressive machinations of Moscow, and now they find themselves subjected to the whims of the Bolshevik! Europe is now forced to tremble, as Bolshevism fixes its bloody bayonet soaked with the blood of the Russian people.

But fear not Italians! We are equipped with fascism, which makes us totally invincible! We are defended by the mighty Italian army! The blood of Caesar and Trajan courses in our veins. Among us are the heroes of Piave! We do not fear the Bolshevik! And we know, if we must, we will take up arms to defend civilization against the Red Barbarian! Like Rome thousands of years ago, we are the guardian of culture against barbarism! Europe must choose, do they join Yugoslavia behind the cloak of Stalin, or do they stand for the bright light of superior European civilization and culture! Never accept the protections of Moscow, and Italians, remember that fascism protects Italy, and will be victorious in the end!   

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DKrol
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« Reply #67 on: July 16, 2022, 10:09:36 PM »

The Prime Minister strongly condemns the new British trade deals, which break the longstanding bonds of the Empire and give preference to others over our fellow men. The Prime Minister calls on the government in London to prioritize Empire-derived trade as the first source of foreign goods before looking abroad.

To address the continued economic downturn, the Prime Minister will table a bill creating the Bank of Canada. The Bank will serve as a federal guarantor of deposits in chartered institutions, regulate the liquidity of markets threw controlled releases or restrictions of currency, and promote the general economic well-being of the Dominion.

The Prime Minister will tour the Atlantic Provinces in the spring time. He will speak to fisherman and loggers and thank them for their hard work. He will also meet with officials in Newfoundland and press the British-appointed officials to hold elections with haste, prioritizing the return of home rule as quickly as possible.
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Devout Centrist
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« Reply #68 on: July 16, 2022, 10:33:57 PM »
« Edited: July 16, 2022, 10:37:36 PM by Devout Centrist »

Quote
Diplomatic Communique to the League of Nations

Date January 15th, 1934

The Empire of Japan views recent developments in Central and Eastern Europe with considerable apprehension. The current conflict in Hungary has the potential to spiral out of control into an all out conflagration that threatens the peace and stability of the whole European continent. My government urges all belligerents to negotiate a peaceful and expeditious settlement to this conflict. The Empire of Japan is willing to send intermediaries to aid in armistice negotiations.

Furthermore, we view Soviet manuevers and interference in Eastern Europe with increasing trepidation. The internationalist Bolshevik state has, in the past, sought to expand its boundaries beyond the Vistula and into Central Europe itself. They have threatened Poles, Germans, Romanians, and the Baltic peoples with subjugation under the banner of a foreign worker's dictatorship.

Soviet security guarantees may represent a first step towards newfound Bolshevik expansion in Europe. My government asks that the nations of Central and Eastern Europe reflect carefully on Soviet diplomatic advances, lest they fall into the internationalist sphere permanently and without the support of their citizenry.

Kōki Hirota
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NewYorkExpress
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« Reply #69 on: July 16, 2022, 10:40:36 PM »

The United States government reiterates their willingness to host armistice and peace negotiations here in the United States.

At this time, we are introducing formal economic sanctions on all items of war, all fuel, and U.S made goods and services to Romania, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia, as well as freezing the bank accounts of all nationals of the aforementioned individuals in the United States.

All Ambassadors to these countries have been recalled at the present time, and diplomatic relations with all of the belligerent parties will be severed until a peace deal is reached.

x Franklin Delano Roosevelt
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S019
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« Reply #70 on: July 16, 2022, 10:58:23 PM »

Statement from the Office of the Prime Minister:

The arms blockade from Italy represents unacceptable foreign interference in a regional conflict and is a transparent attempt by the Italian regime to escalate this conflict. Let it be clear that the United Kingdom does not support this one sided interference by Italy in this conflict. Our intelligence and our foreign policy team has also concluded that this war was initiated by a Hungarian invasion of Yugoslavia. The United Kingdom continues to expresses its support for a peaceful solution to this conflict and continues to pray and mourn for the victims of this brutal war.
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« Reply #71 on: July 16, 2022, 11:57:36 PM »

A TREATY
For Non Aggression



The United Kingdom and the Kingdom of Italy agree,

To swear against belligerency and conflict with any signatories of this agreement

To adopt a policy of non aggression towards any signatory of this agreement

To swear off any acts of aggression or direct provocation towards any signatory of this agreement

This Treaty shall be known as the "Anglo-Italian Non Aggression Treaty"

Duce and Prime Minister Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini


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S019
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« Reply #72 on: July 16, 2022, 11:59:00 PM »

A TREATY
For Non Aggression



The United Kingdom and the Kingdom of Italy agree,

To swear against belligerency and conflict with any signatories of this agreement

To adopt a policy of non aggression towards any signatory of this agreement

To swear off any acts of aggression or direct provocation towards any signatory of this agreement

This Treaty shall be known as the "Anglo-Italian Non Aggression Treaty"

Duce and Prime Minister Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini




X Ramsay MacDonald, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
X John Simon, Foreign Secretary
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DKrol
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« Reply #73 on: July 17, 2022, 09:03:45 PM »

The Prime Minister will take part in a whistle-stop campaign tour across the Dominion in the fall to campaign for Conservative candidates. The tour will begin in Halifax and end in Vancouver, with stops in Charlottetown, Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Regina, and Calgary. The Prime Minister will promote the need for a steady hand at the wheel during the global economic crisis and the growing geopolitical tensions. The Prime Minister will attack the Liberal spending plans as radical and reckless, arguing that a Liberal government would shock the economy into a deeper spiral. The Prime Minister will also make the British tariff issue and the collapse of home rule in Newfoundland significant issues in the campaign, arguing that the Liberals would not stand up to Britain.
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Lumine
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« Reply #74 on: July 18, 2022, 03:02:27 AM »


CRISIS

German Civil War!
NSDAP virtually destroyed, Hugenberg centralizes conservative elements,
After confusing incidents and violent infighting in Berlin, KPD rises up in revolt,
Backed by President Hindenburg, Hugenberg bans the KPD and SPD, sparking a national uprising

FOR: GERMAN REICH

Unwilling to allow continued resistance by the leaderless remnants of the NSDAP, Chancellor Hugenberg immediately encouraged the Reichswehr and loyalist elements to launch further efforts designed at the destruction of the Nazi movements, hoping to end the crisis before the end of the winter. Chased by the military across Pomerania, Joseph Goebbels' militia fell apart due to a lack of training and weaponry, resulting in Goebbels' death in the middle of a fire fight. Rather than risk the consequences of entering the demilitarized Rhineland, it was Der Stahlhelm - as a unofficial militia rather than the Reichswehr that entered the region, storming the city of Cologne in an attempt to put down Hermann Goering's revolt. Several days of fighting - which left the city in ruins - ended with Goering's defeat and capture. Unfortunately, Der Stahlhelm was unable to save the imprisoned mayor Konrad Adenauer (Zentrum), who was executed by a SS squad. Only Ernst Röhm and his SA were able to push back against the Reichswehr, holding onto Nuremberg and expanding their area of control.

With Austrian Chancellor Dollfuss closing the border to prevent the Nazis from escaping into Austria, the NSDAP remnants were forced to either scatter deeper into the Rhineland, or tried to flee towards Röhm to continue the resistance. By the end of January 1934, the NSDAP was virtually neutralized, no longer possessing the strength to take over the Reich. However, the crisis was about to escalate further, right towards full blown civil war. Right at the start of February, and as the SPD-led General Strike paralyzed the country, the KPD arrested a number of suspected Abwehr agents in Berlin, whom they accused of trying to provoke a false-flag operation. The scandal degenerated in a gunfight when a Reichswehr platoon tried to rescue the agents from an attempted lynching, the spark that ignited the German powder keg. KPD leader Ernst Thälmann, fearing an imminent arrest, called for "a national uprising against the reactionary government", and set to (begrudgingly) negotiate with the SPD the immediate recall of the Reichstag.

In the meantime, a reasonably well-prepared Chancellor had come to visit the increasingly ailing President Hindenburg at his Neudeck estate. Warning of an imminent Communist putsch, Hugenberg walked out of Neudeck with an unprecedented series of presidential decrees. Among other dispositions, the KPD was banned, the Reichstag temporarily suspended and martial law declared until June, and striking was declared illegal. Only 48 hours later, when the SPD refused to depose the General Strike and denounced the decrees as the start of a dictatorship, Hugenberg proceeded to ban the SPD as well. Thus the lines were drawn. Devoid of their paramilitaries after the crackdown, and unable to reconvene the Reichstag, the SPD and KPD were forced into an awkward partnership, with Thälmann and SPD Chairman Otto Wells forming an "anti-fascist front", and recruiting "popular militias" to build barricades and seize control over cities.

Alongside Thälmann and Wells, a number of personalities joined the fight against Hugenberg, including Artur Mahraun and his German State Party. On Hugenberg's side, the growing unity of the conservative movement was consolidated by the decision of the DVP to merge with the DNVP, forming the German National Front (DNF). Thus far, Zentrum - still grieving over Adenauer's murder - and Strasser's SF have maintained silence, and the Bavarian government, while allegedly tempted to take a stand against the Chancellor, has enforced the SPD/KPD ban, apparently fearing Thälmann more than Hugenberg. Thus far, the anti-Hugenberg coalition appears stronger in Hamburg, Saxony and even in Berlin itself despite the heavy Reichswehr presence. Given the scale of the fighting, many have declared it an outright Civil War, but it remains unclear how long will it last... and who will prevail.


EVENT

Shock Result in Australian Election!
Once perceived as unelectable, leftist firebrand J. T. "Jack" Lang
leads Australian Labor Party to surprise victory against the moderate UAP

FOR: BRITISH COMMONWEALTH

Hurled out of office in 1931 after an extremely difficult period in government, the leftist Australian Labor Party (ALP) came close to division and implosion, particularly after Joseph Lyons, one its conservative defectors, led the opposition to victory to become Prime Minister under the United Australia Party (UAP) banner. The ALP, having lost almost half its seats, almost split in half due to the bitter conflict between then incumbent PM James Scullin, of moderate instincts, and firebrand Jack Lang, the New South Wales Premier, whose bombastic and populist approach made him both popular and feared. Having almost caused a constitutional crisis, Lang came close to abandoning his old party, only deciding to stay after becoming persuaded that he could wait it out and replace Scullin. Once the dust from the election settled, Lang - who narrowly retained his premiership in 32' - led a campaign of outright political harassment against Scullin, finally replacing him as Labor leader in 1934.

Despite his undeniable appeal and rampant anti-communist, Lang's hard-left economic policies made him a constant target of controversy, and the sheer internal divisions within his party led many to write him off as unelectable. To make matters worse for the new opposition leader, Lyons remained popular and well-liked, even as Australia struggled to make it out of the economic crisis. With an election due for December, Lyons called for a snap election in March, hoping to take full advantage of Lang's recent elevation to the leadership by ensuring Labor was caught off guard. But what should have been an easy, simple campaign resulting in a landslide was not to be. For one, Lang proved an extremely effective orator, rallying against austerity and connecting with the lower classes. For another, the controversy over the British trade deals caused an uproar in the staunchly protectionist Australia, and Lang capitalized on the discontent. Finally, a health scare took Lyons out of the campaign trail, denying the UAP its biggest asset.

When the smoke clear, a bewildered Lyons and his government - as well as all of Lang's internal critics - were astounded to see that the public had been swayed by "The Big Fella". The ALP had attained the barest of majorities in the House and Senate, and was returning to government again. Lang's election as Prime Minister has sent shockwaves across Oceania and even the Commonwealth, suggesting Australia is - for better or worse - about to enter a new era.

1934 Australian General Election:
Party/Alliance   Votes (%)   Seats
Australian Labor Party43% (+3)39 (+17)
United Australia Party33% (-9)25 (-20)
National Party15% (+3)10 (-6)
Social Credit Party4% (NEW)0 (=)
Communist Party2% (+2)0 (=)
Total74 Representatives

Incoming Prime Minister:
Jack Lang (Labor)

Incoming Government:
Labor Majority (1 Seat)
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