The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)
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  The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)
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Author Topic: The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)  (Read 29570 times)
DKrol
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« Reply #100 on: July 23, 2022, 08:36:01 PM »

The Prime Minister condemns the ongoing violence in Europe but reiterates that Canada is focused on Canadian and Commonwealth affairs.
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Lumine
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« Reply #101 on: July 24, 2022, 05:52:31 AM »


CRISIS

Revolution in Spain!
Spanish left revolts against new right-wing ministers in the government,
PSOE-led General Strike paralyzes the country, Asturias seized by revolutionaries,
Catalan President declares Catalan State in Barcelona

FOR: EUROPEAN PLAYERS

The events in Germany have seemingly provoked consequences across Europe, as the Second Spanish Republic becomes the latest European state to face a civil conflict. Following the collapse of Manuel Azaña (IR)'s left-wing government, the October 1933 elections yielded a significant victory to the conservative right, which enjoyed a dramatic increase in popularity following the promulgation of new anti-clerical laws by Azaña. However, the CEDA, Spain's new leading catholic and right-wing party, was not asked to become part of the government, the President instead appointing an unstable moderate government. Unable to govern any longer with further parliamentary support, Prime Minister Alejandro Lerroux (PRR) made the fateful decision to include the CEDA on its cabinet, sparking an immediate and violent response from the Spanish left.

Worried about recent events in Austria and Germany, several left-wing groupings charged that the CEDA entry into government heralded the start of Spanish fascism, and immediately staged a revolt which, by the looks of it, had been planned for some time now. The socialists (PSOE), allied with the small Communist Party (PCE) and the largest trade unions called for a General Strike against the government, which materialized at the start of October and threatened to paralyze entire regions and cities. This was followed with a call for an uprising to "prevent the CEDA from following Hugenberg's lead", which was particularly successful in the northern mining region of Asturias, where improvised Soviets have taken control over most of the region.

The situation has escalated even further due to stunning news from Barcelona, where Catalan President Lluís Companys has launched a formal challenge against the government in Madrid and declared the foundation of the new "Catalan State", calling it "a bastion against fascism" and inviting left-wing Republican leaders to form a provisional government to topple PM Lerroux. Reports remain confusing as to whether Companys actually has the backing of sufficient military or militia forces to actually give viability to his Catalan State, but it is clear that the Spanish Republic faces the dire prospect of civil war and armed separatism. What Lerroux - and the European community - will do next will certainly shape events to come in the Iberian Peninsula.


EVENT

Hugenberg seemingly prevails in Civil War
Months of infighting leave thousands dead, economy in ruins,
KPD and SPD leadership captured or in exile, Thälmann flees to Russia, Wells imprisoned,
Zentrum and SF thus far supportive of government, but national call for elections grows

FOR: GERMAN REICH

Since the start of nationwide conflict during February, the so-called German Civil War has raged on all the way into June, a bitter, bloody struggle that, while producing what seems to be a clear winner, has also left the German Reich economically weakened and politically polarized. Devoid of paramilitary forces, and after initial attempts by the SPD to gather support from moderate elements inside the Reichswehr failed, the SPD-KPD coalition was forced to rely on protests, strikes, and urban uprisings to try and seize the major population centers of the country. As a result, the "Civil War" was atypical in that it did not feature large regions breaking up from the government to serve as opposition strongholds, and thus being more of a war of attrition rather than a war for territory.

Early successes by the anti-fascist front included the seizure of Dresden and Hamburg, as well as the total paralyzation of Berlin and its industries. Indeed, even as they started to score military successes, the Hugenberg government and the Reichswehr were unable to get the industries moving again, with the resulting economic effects. It rapidly became clear that the KPD was far better organized than its moderate counterpart and thus able to better resist the enemy onslaught, a factor which - combined with an open call for revolution by General Secretary Stalin - has ruthlessly exploited by Chancellor Hugenberg by presenting himself as the "vanguard against Bolshevism". Frightened with the prospect of a Communist revolution after Stalin's call, Zentrum fell in line with the government, and the Strasserites did the same afterwards.

Unable to take control of Berlin despite weeks of street fighting, the anti-fascist coalition started to lose steam as the summer approached, unable to muster the same resources as the Reichswehr and Der Stahlhelm despite significant popular enthusiasm and support. Long sieges of Hamburg and Dresden - isolated from other bases of support - resulted in their fall during the last days of May. And whereas Ernst Thälmann escaped via sea to the Soviet Union, the bulk of the SPD leadership - including Chairman Wells - were captured and imprisoned by the government. As June rages on, and despite continued attempts at striking that are brutally put down by the Reichswehr, it is clear that Hugenberg's opponents have failed to take control over the state machinery and of significant territory.

With the Chancellor as the clear winner thus far of the armed struggle after prevailing in his struggle against formidable foes, it is nonetheless undeniable that the Reich is in a dire state due the economic cost of the past struggles. Furthermore, the Chancellor has become an extremely polarizing figure, a dictator among the left and the anti-communist hero of the right. With the depleted Reichstag - having lost two thirds of its deputies - soon to reconvene, and amidst a great pressure for new elections in spite of the nationwide chaos, Hugenberg has far greater freedom of action than he did eighteen months ago, but it remains to be seen how he'll exploit it.


EVENT

Partial GOP recovery in US Midterms
Democrats gain in the Senate, lose ground in the House
GOP still split between progressives and conservatives,
FDR, while popular, hurt by several controversies

FOR: UNITED STATES

After almost two years in office, the time had come for voters to pass their verdict on the Roosevelt Administration. It had been two years filled with excitement, controversy and surprising political developments, featuring a nation doing its best to escape the depression under the banner of the New Deal whilst President Roosevelt pushed for an historically ambitious agenda.

Well aware that virtually all administrations lost seats in their respective midterms, the Democrats prepared to defend their record and hold onto their large majorties, while the previously demoralized and gutted Republicans prepared to attempt a comeback despite being so decisively hurled out of office by a despairing electorate. Roosevelt and the Democrats were armed by a score of popular New Deal initiatives, which, despite a severe lack of funding and the threat of Supreme Court challenges - which are yet to be decided upon - were undeniably well received by voters, particularly the unemployed and the poor. President Roosevelt, furthermore, had also made progress in overturning protectionism in favor of free trade, staged a successful and brief intervention in Nicaragua to evacuate US civilians, and raised tax rates on the wealthy, all decisions which heralded success in the midterms.

These moves, however, were also overshadowed by a number of controversies, including a banking debacle that continues to hurt the economy, intense isolationist criticism of the President regarding a 1933 aid package to Yugoslavia, comments by former War Secretary Dern, the successful confirmation of Joseph Kennedy as War Secretary - following an intense and damaging filibuster by Senator Huey Long -, and the alienation of important politicians like Republican William Borah and Democrat Walter George, both of which became external or internal foes. However, it is believed - by the press - that one of the most damaging decisions was the push to loosen immigration restrictions, which many described as "politically toxic". Indeed, many racially charged cartoons and defamatory pieces circulated around the country, hurting the President's standing among anti-immigration voters while providing a boost in ethnic communities.

For its part, the GOP was still heavily damaged by the legacy of the Hoover Administration and its internal divisions between progressives and conservatives, which almost led to split only narrowly averted following an increase in progressive strength. Despite this internal division, the GOP focused its campaign on separate attempts to appeal to either side, with progressive GOP leaders lambasting Roosevelt on foreign affairs and/or calling for the New Deal to be better run; and conservative GOP leaders rallying their supporters on immigration and taxation. Confident of strong gains against Roosevelt, the GOP leadership would be somewhat disappointed after only achieving a partial recovery in November, the popularity of the New Deal being difficult to overcome for the time being. Among other factors, experts have noticed strong pro-FDR swings by Japanese-American and Hungarian-American voters, as well as significant losses to the GOP in Midwestern states.

On the whole, the Democrats were able to successfully expand their Senate majority by one seat, remaining three short of a majority and coming extremely close to defeating several GOP incumbents. In turn, the GOP achieved a small recovery in the House, capturing two dozen extra seats and laying the groundwork for significant gains should the national environment be friendlier next time. Perhaps the most hurtful result for the President may have been on the Gubernatorial front, in which - despite a shock victory by Upton Sinclair in California - a number of Midwestern Governors went down in defeat. All things considered, the Democrats continue to outnumber the Republicans 2-1 on all three sets of officeholders.

1934 US Governor Election:
PartySeats
Democratic Party32 (-5)
Republican Party15 (+6)
Farmer Labor Party1 (=)
Total48 Governors

1934 US Senate Election:
PartySeats
Democratic Party61 (+1)
Republican Party34 (-1)
Farmer Labor Party1
Total96 Senators

1934 US House Election:
PartySeats
Democratic Party290 (-23)
Republican Party141 (+24)
Farmer Labor Party4 (-1)
Total435 Representatives
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windjammer
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« Reply #102 on: July 25, 2022, 04:02:31 AM »

The Republic of Poland condamns the recent uprisings happening in Spain against the legitimate and democratic government.

Prime Minister Leroux has Poland's total support against the foreign plotted insurrection.
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« Reply #103 on: July 25, 2022, 06:42:09 AM »
« Edited: July 25, 2022, 09:16:10 AM by Primadonna Socialist »



Prime Minister Lang rallies support for Female Suffrage world-wide

Fresh off the heels of a victorious election campaign, newly inducted Prime Minister Lang has made public his governments push to support female suffragettes world-wide. Calling the move for female suffrage one of the "great battles of our time" Lang connected the campaign to other social justice causes supported by his Labor party during the election campaign such as the establishment of government run medical services and the introduction of a minimum wage.

"Woman, as the Chief Officers running our households for many a century, have a grand perspective to offer our governments and the way in which we do business -- as one of the First Nations to establish the vote for Women upon the foundation of our Commonwealth I want Australia to be a world leader when it comes to campaigning for the rights of all women to equal suffrage."

As part of a Labor campaign seeking to attract the female vote Prime Minister Lang announced that he would be appointing Joan Folette, a labor canvasser from Melbourne, as the Head of a newly established 'Office for Women's Affairs' which would advise the government on issues pertaining to the well-being of Women and ways in which the Australian Commonwealth can assist suffragettes world-wide.
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RGM2609
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« Reply #104 on: July 25, 2022, 04:09:00 PM »

The German Reich declares its full support for the legitimate Spanish government and hopes for the revolt to be put down quickly and at minimum cost.
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« Reply #105 on: July 25, 2022, 05:16:38 PM »

President Roosevelt has elected to nominate the recently defeated Governor of Wisconsin, Albert Schmederman as the Secretary of Agriculture, replacing Henry Wallace, who was confirmed as Secretary of the Treasury.
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« Reply #106 on: July 25, 2022, 05:21:42 PM »

Secretary of the Treasury Henry Wallace and Secretary of Commerce Daniel Roper will lead a Presidential delegation around the world, stopping in London, Paris, Rome, Canberra and Tokyo.

At each stop, Wallace and Roper will meet their governmental counterpart for a meet-and-greet, as well as private citizens in the respective countries to discuss American economic policy.
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« Reply #107 on: July 25, 2022, 11:08:53 PM »


OFFICIAL MESSAGE FROM BUDAPEST

Quote
His Serene Highness and Regent of the Kingdom of Hungary, Miklós Horthy, congratulates President Hugenberg on defeating the Godless Reds!


Quote
"Regent Horthy would like to warmly congratulate President Hugenberg on his victory over the Godless puppets of Moscow. Indeed, the Lord has blessed him and his righteous armies victory thus sparing the Getman people the same terrible fate that we fell victim to 20 years ago. We eagerly look forwards to future cooperation and the strengthening of our friendship with the German people."

X His Serene Highness and Regent of Hungary, Miklós Horthy
X Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hungary, Gyula Gömbös

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« Reply #108 on: July 26, 2022, 01:19:57 AM »

President Roosevelt has made a new offer to Fillipino leaders, offering Independence on January 1, 1936, in exchange for a combined U.S/Philippine Military base on Luzon Island.
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Lumine
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« Reply #109 on: July 31, 2022, 04:44:29 PM »

End of 1934



In the News:

TIME PERSON OF THE YEAR: Chancellor Alfred Hugenberg
NOBEL PEACE PRIZE: Lady Ishbel Hamilton-Gordon

Third Balkan War
Hungary gains unexpected respite, Budapest survives the year,
Croatia erupts in civil war, Vladko Macek proclaims a Croatian Republic,
Italian blockade and US embargo harming Little Entente, Dubrovnik incident

By all accounts, most international observers expected the Kingdom of Hungary to fall to Entente forces during 1934, the dire strategic situation offering few – if any – comfort – to the beleaguered Regent Horthy. Contrary to those expectations, Hungary would survive the year, mostly due to unexpected strokes of luck. Having marched all the way to the outskirts of Budapest, the Czech military inexplicably remained immobile, giving the Hungarians enough time to fortify their positions and prevent an encirclement of the capital. Thus forced into trench warfare, the Czechs have refrained from any attempt at breaching the Hungarian positions, resulting in a mostly fixed frontline and little – if any – Entente advanced. A similar phenomenon developed in the Yugoslav front, with the Yugoslav Army remaining cautious – if not inactive – until the outbreak of civil war prevented further offensive operations to finish Hungary off.

Only the Romanians were able to resume their operations, further storming into eastern Hungary and rapidly overrunning half the country. It is generally believed that, were it not for their allies’ inactivity, Romania might have pushed further, but declined to do so to avoid bearing the brunt of casualties and due to intense partisan activity in Transylvania. For its part, lack of clear instructions also prevented the Hungarians to capitalize on their enemies’ potential vulnerabilities, resulting in most of the country occupied while the Hungarians remain massively under-equipped compared to their foes. Although the combination of the Italian blockade of the Adriatic and the US embargo have dealt heavy blows to the economies of the Entente, recent treaties with Turkey have opened up a major lifeline via Romania, keeping the coalition well supplied.

Ultimately, the major development of the year during 1934 has not taken place in the Hungarian battlefields, but within Yugoslavia proper. Although clever action by King Alexander had prevented an uprising in Croatia last year and dealt a heavy blow to the Ustache, discontent in the region – an opposition to the war - had been growing steadily. And what appeared to be isolated incidents, including mass desertion by Croatian conscripts, proved to be a full-blown effort to seize the initiative. During the late autumn, a series of strikes across Croatia culminated in an all-out uprising, resulting in deserting troops and militias storming arsenals, garrison posts and cities to drive out what they described as “Serbian invaders”. With the Ustache seemingly taking the early lead in terms of prominence, Vladko Macek’s Croatian Peasant Party (HSS) decided that it could not be outflanked on the issue.

Appearing at a massive gathering in Zagreb, Macek proclaimed the foundation of a Croatian Republic, calling on the public to resist. In the following days of combat, and despite a lack of officers – as the Yugoslav officer corps was predominantly Serbian – Zagreb and other key cities fell to the Croatians, disrupting Yugoslav efforts. The uprising, however, is by no means in an advantageous position, with several large Yugoslav units still stationed in Croatia, a lack of territorial continuity, and internal divisions between the Ustache and the HSS all providing challenges of their own. To make matters more tense, a recent naval engagement off Dubrovnik between the Regia Marina and a merchant flotilla has – according to Italian officers - uncovered a coordinated effort to engage in blockade running to supply arms to Yugoslavia, allegedly spearheaded by the French.

The Spanish Revolution
Catalan Premier successfully seizes control of Catalonia, incident with the Regia Marina,
Asturian Soviet expands into the Basque Country, government prepares crackdown

What started as a General Strike called against the center-right government of Alejandro Lerroux (PRR) has now turned into an actual conflict across Spain, described – depending on the source – either as a revolution or a civil war. Having decided to occupy Asturias to eliminate its new revolutionary Soviet, the Spanish Ministry of War was horrified when some of the troops sent – coming from a similar socio-economic background – joined the workers, disrupting the planned government offensive and allowing the Asturias Soviet to consolidate control. As the government forces withdrew by mid-December – also thwarted on their operations by the onset of a harsh winter – the Asturias Soviet expanded into the Basque Country with the help of left-wing Basque nationalists, only stopped by the opposition of local militias in Navarre, and by the refusal of the moderate Basque nationalists of the PNV to join an uprising.

Meanwhile, in Barcelona, Catalan Premier Lluís Companys was able to – after the arrest of their commanding officer - seize control over most of the military and police forces in the region, thus gathering sufficient strength to formalize his proclamation of a Catalan State. In a series of skirmishes between November and December, the new Catalan Army – complemented by nationalist or anarchist militias – has fought local Spanish Army units and forced their withdrawal to prevent encirclement. However, Companys’ call to form an alternate Republic government based in Barcelona has not yet encountered sufficient support, with only a handful of PCE and PSOE leaders flying to Catalonia. Crucially, former left-wing PM Manuel Azaña is yet to comment on the ongoing revolution, and his stance is likely to prove important.

Still, whilst the Catalans send diplomatic envoys across Europe seeking recognition, other powers have already started an intervention to support the current government. There are rumors published in the Catalonian press that a German military mission has apparently arrived in Madrid, and, following orders by Il Duce, the Regia Marina has maneuvered outside the Catalan coast, engaging in brief naval encounters with ships flying the Catalan flag. In a highly publicized incident, an Italian destroyer fought and sunk a frigate seized by the Catalan State, resulting in a dozen Italian casualties and almost a hundred Catalan ones.

Chinese Civil War
Jiangxi Soviet crushed by KMT armies, CCP attempts to flee west,
Chiang blockades southern foes, Soviet weapons discovered,
Xinjiang falls to pro-KMT warlord, Zhang loyalists crushed in Manchuria

Having restarted in full fashion in the aftermath of domestic backlash to the Sino-Japanese Treaty, the Chinese Civil War continued across 1934 in a rapidly growing scope, forcing previously uninvolved participants to take sides as the respective coalitions began to take form. In regards to Chiang’s KMT government, an early victory was secured when the Soviet Union seemingly ignored desperate entreaties from Xinjiang, an act that allowed the young, brash KMT general Ma Zhongying to overthrow and kill the local warlord. Seizing control over the entire far-western province, Ma has emerged as its new warlord, somewhat autonomous due to the distance yet outwardly loyal to Chiang. Up north, the alliance between Feng Yuxiang and Zhang Xueliang combined its forces into a “Northern Coalition”, facing a war on two fronts against Chiang and the Kwantung Army. Down south, Hu Hanmin expanded his coalition – previously enlarged by the defecting 19th Route Army – by allying with the Guangxi Clique, thus forming a “Southern Coalition”.

With the KMT shifting to a defensive stance across the north, the Northern Coalition led a moderately successful offensive, gaining some ground but remaining unable to crush the local NRA units. The Northern Coalition was, however, dealt a heavy blow following events up north. Despite a change in government in Tokyo producing a moderate, Toseiha-dominated government, the Kwantung Army continued its “counter-insurgency” operations, destroying the remaining Zhang loyalists in Manchuria and taking over several border towns in Inner Mongolia. Adding to the controversy over these operations are claims by Zhang himself, who asserts that the Kwantung Army has systematically tortured and machine-gunned prisoners belonging to his forces. In the south, Chiang had his naval forces institute a blockade of Guangzhou, hoping to inflict a key blow against his foes. In the dark of night, blockading vessels seized a flotilla of cargo ships transporting large weapons shipments to Hu’s forces. The KMT officers reported that the cargo bore Soviet iconography, causing alarm in Nanjing and raising the question of Soviet involvement in the Civil War.

Chiang, however, was unable to make much headway against the Southern Coalition, with an attempt to cross the Hainan Strait to invade the Leizhou Peninsula ending in disaster. Ultimately, the main KMT blow was apparently directed at the Jiangxi Soviet following months of preparations, showing the clear effects of French training of the NRA. A series of violent encirclement battles proved wildly successful, destroying several Communist divisions and collapsing the CCP’s stronghold. Unable to resist, the CCP is making a desperate attempt to escape destruction, by engaging its forces into a western march. Thus far, the bulk of their fleeing forces has entered Hunan province, forcing its fiercely anti-communist governor – He Jian – to declare for Chiang, an act followed by minor Sichuan warlords.

Thus, and with only the Ma and Yunnan cliques yet to take sides, China is seemingly split in three, pitting both Northern and Southern Coalitions against the consolidated pro-Chiang front. The KMT continues to hold significant advantages despite being beset by foes, but a lack of domestic action and the unpopularity of the treaty are cited by observers as one of the factors as to why the anti-Chiang coalitions remain so large.

The German Autumn of (Uneasy) Calm
Resistance across the Reich crushed, Hugenberg prevails,
Hollowed-out Reichstag resumes work, conflict between President and Chancellor,
Hindenburg passes away in his sleep, German future up in question

As the summer of 1934 ended, it became beyond clear that, at least when it came to actual, organized infighting, the German Civil War was over. Unable to offer coordinated resistance and/or to raise an army, the anti-fascist coalition was crushed by the Reichswehr and by pro-government militias. Having been only marginally more successful, the remnants of the Nazi movement were crushed as well, the city of Nuremberg being liberated at last as Ernst Röhm fled the Reich – his whereabouts unknown – and a number of Nazi supporters fled into the Sudetenland. For all practical purposes, Chancellor Hugenberg was the most powerful man in the Reich, and perhaps the most divisive and polarizing of them all. To the conservative moment and to millions of citizens desperate for order and purpose, the Chancellor appeared to be a savior. To the German left and the former Nazis, he was either a traitor or a dictatorial reactionary.

Whatever the case, the Chancellor was now free to undertake new moves facing much less opposition. The Reichstag, hollowed-out by arrests and only fielding one third of its deputies elected in 1932, reconvened with an actual government majority due to support from the Social Revolutionary Front, a result of Gregor Strasser’s entry to the Cabinet as Labor Minister. The opposition consisted mostly of the Zentrum and the BVP, both parties that – according to the goals of Zentrum Chairman Kaas and former Chancellor Brüning – were willing to be a “responsible opposition” to a presidential government. As a result, Hugenberg was able to pass a number of economic measures to alleviate the near-terminal state of the German economy, all while treading the thin line of expanding the German armament industry without formally breaching the Treaty of Versailles.

Unexpectedly, the main source of conflict for Hugenberg was to be the ailing, moribund President Hindenburg. Despite very ambitious plans for the second half of the year, the Chancellor was thwarted on his aspirations when the President – perhaps goaded by some members of his camarilla – refused to grant approvals for bold constitutional reform, citing the need for the nation to recuperate after such a traumatic period. A back and forth developed between Neudeck and the Chancellorship in Berlin, threatening a break-up within the conservative movement and, allegedly, raising concerns within the increasingly powerful and autonomous Reichswehr. In the end, the matter resolved itself through Hindenburg’s poor health and old age, with the giant dying in his sleep in late November. As a result, Hugenberg has temporarily assumed the duties of the Presidency, constitutionally bound to call for a new election in the first weeks of 1935.

1934 Canadian General Election
R. B. Bennett’s election gamble succeeds, Conservatives hold onto power despite losses,
Newfoundland holds referendum in the eve of the election, votes to join Canada,
King’s Liberals undercut by Newfoundland issue, rise of new rival parties

Taking office at one of the harshest moments of the economic depression in Canada, R. B. Bennett and his Conservative Party faced an increasingly uphill struggle to revive the economy and prevent political degradation, even with the next election five years away. As Bennett’s popularity became weakened due to internal infighting and economic drama, his own party and its rivals worked from the assumption that the Conservatives would attempt to “run the clock”, and prolong Parliament to the end, hoping that a late economic surge may yet materialize. To everyone’s surprise, the Prime Minister called for an early election for December 1934, having previously laid the groundwork by exploiting the controversy over British trade and by taking action to create a nationwide Bank of Canada.

Caught by surprise, internal Conservative rivals – who, unbeknownst to the PM, were considering a breakaway party – were forced to stand behind Bennett, who would take on Liberal leader Mackenzie King in a rematch. On paper, the Liberal position looked strong despite King’s economic conservatism, particularly due to the gloomy economic outlook. But as the campaign went on, the Liberal leader was not only undercut by his relative lack of charisma – never one of its assets –, but also by the emergence of rival leftist or populist parties that were easily able to outbid him in terms of promises. Bennett, who had a false start after attempts to tie King to Australian PM Lang fell flat with the electorate, found his footing after an intense whistle-stop tour, championing issues such as tariffs and Newfoundland.

The campaign seemed headed to a hung parliament – with King narrowly defeating Bennett – when, unexpectedly, the British government moved forward with a referendum in Newfoundland, asking its citizens to decide between independence or integration in Canada or the United Kingdom to settle the issue immediately. Following a brief campaign, in which both Premier Alderdice and Opposition Leader Squires endorsed Canadian integration, the first round of the referendum saw Canadian and British integration beating independence, with the pro-Canadian side winning the runoff with 62% of the vote. This had a seismic effect on the Canadian Election, with Bennett’s arguments appearing to be vindicated.

On Election Night, and despite a loss of 12 seats, the Conservatives rode a late surge and retained government with 125 MP’s small but workable majority of 5. A disappointed King saw the Liberals gain a mere 10 seats, remaining below 100 MP’s. The surprise of the night was provided by the leftist Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) and the populist Social Credit Party (CF), both of which entered Parliament with almost twenty seats between them. PM Bennett will thus remain in power, leaving Mackenzie King’s future under question, and raising the prospect of immediate integration of Newfoundland within the Dominion.

1934 Canadian General Election:
Party   Votes (%)   Seats
Conservative Party42% (-6)125 (-12)
Liberal Party40% (-4)97 (+10)
Co-operative Commonwealth12% (NEW)10 (+10)
Social Credit Party3% (NEW)7 (+2)
Others3% 6
Total245 MP's

Incoming Prime Minister:
R. B. Bennett (Conservative)

Incoming Government:
Conservative Majority (5 Seats)
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« Reply #110 on: July 31, 2022, 04:47:24 PM »

Sanation Moves On
After mourning Pilsudski, surprise heir consolidates control,
Following policy gambles, Poland awaits outcome with bated breath

Unaware of his declining health, the Polish public was surprised by the seemingly sudden death of First Marshal Pilsudski, the father of the new, modern Polish Republic. The outpouring of reactions to his demise ranged from despair from the supporters of his Sanation movement, to cautious condolences by the opposition, to outright disdain by his harshest critics. Undoubtedly, Pilsudski’s passing left no one without an opinion on his long tenure of leading the nation either formally or informally. It came as an additional surprise that his successor in his military roles was not one of the three key figures of Sanation, being instead the lesser known Adam Koc, until then one of Pilsudski’s “Colonels” and a government Vice-Minister.

Buoyed by the symbolic implications of being handpicked by Pilsudski, Koc was quick to wield said newfound prestige to cut deals with those that could have been his internal rivals, pursuing a power-sharing scheme that kept Ignacy Moscicki as President, elevated Edward Rydz-Smigly to the Ministry of the Interior, and Walery Slavek to the Foreign Ministry. Koc, replicating Pilsudski’s avoidance of being formally in charge of the state, eliminated the Premiership and assumed the new position of Minister of State, presiding over the cabinet and seizing control over the War and Economic ministries. Having thus prevented – at least for not – an internal split within Sanation, Koc rapidly implemented his own ideas as to how Poland should be run.

Ending the trade war with Germany and reaffirming the Franco-Polish alliance, Koc courted immediate controversy by devaluating the currency, sparking immediate criticism from the opposition and foreign investors. This was followed by a strong push for deficit spending through creative, highly experimental mechanisms, fueling state expenditure into public works and defense spending. Partly due to state propaganda championing Koc as Pildudski’s worthy heir, the Minister of State has been able to gain time for his proposed reforms to start taking effect despite their controversial nature, even as the opposition warns of impending doom. For many, the following months may well prove decisive for the future of the Sanation regime.

France turns to the left
Daladier and Blum join forces, Radicals and Socialists form a government,
French right abandons the PM, anti-Semitism on the rise,
Government exploits Stavisky and domestic reforms to bolster popularity

Pushed into the brink of collapse due to the separate pressure from different parties and sides of the political spectrum, Edouard Daladier surprised observers by surviving for a second year, having drastically altered the rules of the game. Having taken it for granted that SFIO leader Leon Blum would ultimately refuse Daladier for the second time, the French center-right was shocked to discover that the Prime Minister had been able to fulfill Blum’s conditions. Thus, a Radical-SFIO coalition was formed, reconstructing the “Cartel des Gauches” coalition that had already won the 1932 Election and ending the split that had prevented them from forming a common government. As the AD angrily stormed out to join the opposition benches, Blum became Finance Minister, devoting himself alongside Daladier to pursuing a major agenda of domestic reform.

Having a narrow majority, but a majority nonetheless, Daladier and Blum fought the unyielding criticism of the French right, united in rejection of what they described as “a Marxist government”. Among other measures, the government enacted policies that drastically improved working conditions and the power of the trade unions, courting great popularity among the workers whilst drawing a mixed reception within the middle classes. The arrest and highly publicized trial of embezzler Alexandre Stavisky was also exploited by the government to pursue an anti-corruption agenda, which has taken down several prominent personalities at the cost of – limited – embarrassment to Daladier’s party. Thus far, the Daladier-Blum duo appears to be vastly more popular than its opposition on the right, but this has not stopped the far-right from targeting Blum personally – due to his ethnicity – as well as Stavisky, using harsh anti-Semitic rhetoric to warn of the dangers of Jewish political influence in France.

Famine in the Soviet Union?
Journalistic debate over Ukraine becomes a rhetorical frontline,
Mussolini-Stalin rivalry gains steam, politicians take sides

After months of rumors, it was Welsh journalist Gareth Jones who finally came forward to publish a story by name, accusing the Soviet Union of worsening and trying to cover up an “unprecedented famine” in the Ukraine. According to Jones, who was prevented from publishing until American media mogul William Randolph Hearst lent his publishing empire to repeat Jones’ claims, thousands – if not more – have perished of starvation in the region under the most horrifying conditions imaginable. This has sparked immediate controversy in the world of journalism, as several Moscow-based reporters – including prominent American and British journalists – have rebuked Jones’ claims and described them either as exaggerated or ideologically motivated. This debate has extended into Europe itself, with Stalin having recently grown in prominence after his unexpected guarantees to the Little Entente and support for the anti-fascist front in Germany.

Indeed, politicians have been quick to react to the news, with prominent Socialist or left-wing leaders refuting the notion of a famine and/or speaking in positive tones about Stalin, praising the General Secretary over his recent foreign policy. More specifically, European Communist parties have asserted that any “discomfort” in the region has been addressed, with the General Secretary – allegedly – firing those responsible of resource mismanagement, and reserves released to alleviate any shortages. On the other side of the affair, conservative or anti-communist personalities have denounced the situation and redoubled their warnings against Soviet meddling in Europe, with many hailing Italian duce Benito Mussolini for his recent speeches echoing similar points.

Brother Suffragette?
Australian PM gains notoriety over push for female suffrage,
League of Nations passes motion, Ishbel Hamilton-Gordon wins Nobel Peace Prize

Elected on a surprise victory as the new Prime Minister of Australia, political firebrand Jack Lang was quick to jump into the world stage in a way few – if any – of his predecessors have managed, gaining notoriety for what has usually been dismissed as another distant British Dominion. Lang, who has also thrown himself into a radical campaign of domestic reform – being now in the middle of a fight to push an unprecedented National Health Service bill through Parliament -, has become particularly outspoken on the cause of female suffrage, whose apparent need as a world-wide policy he has championed. Amidst the backdrop of multiple failed motions at the League of Nations – prompting mounting frustration at the organization -, Lang was able to push through one embracing women’s suffrage, albeit with quite a few abstentions.

Perhaps as a recognition of these efforts, and perhaps – as some have implied – due to the current state of Europe, the Nobel Committee decided to award the 1934 Peace Prize to British aristocrat and philanthropist Ishbel Hamilton-Gordon, President of the International Council of Women and renowned over her support of women’s issues and interests. What remains to be seen, however, is how this push will affect domestic politics in countries that are yet to institute female suffrage, particularly those in which the issue is still divisive or controversial. Among others, nations like France, Yugoslavia, the Republic of China, the Empire of Japan and Switzerland do not yet grant women the right to vote.

Carnage in South America
Chaco War continues unabated,
Somoza and Sandino trade blows in Nicaragua

Although most of the attention in the global press is being directed at the outbreak of civil conflict across Europe, recent developments in South America have not gone unnoticed on account of their brutality. Contrasting, perhaps, with the peaceful withdrawal of US forces from Haiti, the US withdrawal from Nicaragua has coincided with the outbreak of civil war between General Anastasio Somoza, the man behind the throne in the current government, and his rival Augusto César Sandino, a nationalist revolutionary. Following a failed assassination attempt on Sandino by Somoza, the revolutionary has fled north to mobilize his forces, which had gained significant guerrilla experience after years of fighting the US occupying forces. Thus far, Sandino has seized much of the countryside and his forces are even close to the capital in Managua, whereas Somoza – whose control over the government grows exponentially – and his National Guard hold strong in the cities.

With the US forces having staged a successful, last minute operation during the second half of the year to rescue and evacuate their citizens, the stage is set for what is already a violent showdown between both men, which has resulted in hundreds of civilian casualties. And further south, the Chaco War between Paraguay and Bolivia – started due to their desire to seize control over a resource rich region – enters its third year, with no signs of stopping. Despite initial advantages in manpower and resources, as well as a successful push into Paraguay, Bolivia has started to struggle heavily due to a lack of training, strategic blunders, and the terrain/climate of the region, so unfriendly as to be the cause of most casualties on both sides. After rebuilding their forces, the Paraguayan Army has gone on the offensive, pushing Bolivia back until the war has degenerated into trench warfare. As Bolivians and Paraguayans die by the thousands, there is no end in sight.
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« Reply #111 on: August 03, 2022, 09:17:29 PM »

Turn III: 1935


The Cast:

German Reich: Acting President Alfred Hugenberg (RGM2609)
United States of America: President Franklin D. Roosevelt (NewYorkExpress)
Empire of Japan: Emperor Hirohito (Devout Centrist)
British Empire: Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald (S019)
Republic of France: Prime Minister Edouard Daladier (YPestis25)
Soviet Union: General Secretary Josef Stalin (GoTfan)
Kingdom of Italy: Duce Benito Mussolini (KaiserDave)
Republic of China: Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek (Kuumo)
Republic of Turkey: President Mustafa Kemal (Spiral)
Dominion of Canada: Prime Minister R. B. Bennett (DKrol)
Czechoslovak Republic: President Tomáš Masaryk (JacksonHitchcock)
Union of South Africa: Prime Minister Jan Smuts (Ishan)
Spanish Republic: Prime Minister Alejandro Lerroux (Dereich)
Kingdom of Hungary: Regent Miklós Horthy (AverageFoodEnthusiast)
Polish Republic: Inspector General Adam Koc (Windjammer)
Kingdom of Romania: King Carol II Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (Muaddib)
Kingdom of Bulgaria: Tsar Boris III Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (OBD)
Commonwealth of Australia: Prime Minister Jack Lang (iBizzBee)

Economic Performance:
Empire of Japan: High
Soviet Union: Moderate
British Empire: Moderate
Kingdom of Italy: Moderate
Republic of Turkey: High
Union of South Africa: Moderate

Republic of France: Weak
Dominion of Canada: Weak
Commonwealth of Australia: Weak
German Reich: Weak
United States of America: Weak
Polish Republic: Weak
Kingdom of Romania: Weak
Spanish Republic: Weak
Kingdom of Bulgaria: Weak

Republic of China: Very Weak
Czechoslovak Republic: Very Weak
Kingdom of Hungary: Very Weak

Popularity:

Emperor Hirohito: High
Regent Horthy: High
Duce Mussolini: High
Tsar Boris III: High
President Kemal: High
Prime Minister Lang: High

President Masaryk: Moderate
President Roosevelt: Moderate
General Inspector Koc: Moderate
Prime Minister MacDonald: Moderate
General Secretary Stalin: Moderate
Prime Minister Daladier: Moderate
Chancellor Hugenberg: Moderate
Prime Minister Bennett: Moderate
Prime Minister Smuts: Moderate

King Carol II: Low
Prime Minister Lerroux: Low

Generalissimo Chiang: Very Low

Mobilization Level:
Total Mobilization: None
War Mobilization: Republic of China, Kingdom of Hungary, Czechoslovak Republic, Kingdom of Romania
Partial Mobilization: None
Conscription: Republic of France, Empire of Japan, Soviet Union, Kingdom of Italy, Polish Republic, Republic of Turkey, Spanish Republic
Volunteer Army: United States of America, British Empire, Dominion of Canada, Union of South Africa, German Reich (Imposed by Versailles), Commonwealth of Australia, Kingdom of Bulgaria (Imposed by Neuilly-sur-Seine)
Demilitarized: None

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« Reply #112 on: August 03, 2022, 09:21:14 PM »

German Reich:


Chancellor (and Acting President),

President Hindenburg is dead. Given your previous and last minute mutual disagreement on the constitutional future of the Reich, the sudden disappearance of the once towering giant may be taken as positive news, but it also poses yet another dilemma on your long path towards political supremacy. Though you are now – temporarily – the Acting President, the law forces you to hold a presidential election in the coming weeks, the results of which may be difficult to predict after such a turbulent past couple of years. Therefore, you face the complex question of whether to allow the elections or not. And if the voting is to proceed, will you stand as a candidate and, if victorious, appoint a new Chancellor? Or should you recruit someone else to run instead?

Among the many territories lost as a result of the Treaty of Versailles, the Saar – currently the Territory of the Saar Basin – remains unique in terms of its status, being under administration by the League of Nations and due to hold a plebiscite in 1935 in terms of its future: status quo, unification with France… or rejoining the Reich as part of its sovereign territory. Regaining the Saar is, naturally, a deep seated desire for many ordinary Germans, but the chaos of the recent years make it hard to predict whether the Saar residents actually wish reunification. To make matters more difficult, France will undoubtedly have a say in the issue. How will you handle the Saar question?

After vanquishing so many foes, and despite the enlargement of the German National Front into a far more impressive organization than the DNVP ever was, there are those within the government that worry about your divisive leadership after a two-front civil war, as well as concerns within your remaining external “allies” – Strasser, Kaas and Brüning – that they may be next. With the Zentrum expecting you to deliver a Concordat with the Vatican as well as guarantees regarding its continued existence, and Strasser planning ambitious, bold legislation to handle the trade unions, your advisors seem split between those who argue such allies – or “responsible opponents” – are necessary since the nation could ill afford more unrest, and those who are more enthusiastic about the prospect of the conservative revolution. What will you do?

British Empire:


Prime Minister,

With the arrival of 1935, it will soon be four years since the past General Election, in which the National Government steamrolled the rump Labour opposition to a near-unprecedented majority. As the economy – despite ongoing controversy with the Dominions – is starting to show signs of improvement, your inner circle in National Labour is starting to wonder about the future, an ever more pressing question as you approach 70. Is it time to seek a General Election, or should it wait until the last possible moment next year? Will you remain in office regardless? Or should you stand down either to hand over power to the Conservatives or a National Labour successor?

An increasingly prominent issue ever since the trade controversy, Britain’s relationship to the Dominions is yet again tested, warranting at least some measure of action. Newfoundland has voted for unification with Canada, after Prime Minister Bennett campaigned on a stance critical of Britain. In Australia, the controversial Jack Lang has suspended debt payments, in what promises to be a blow to the Exchequer. And in South Africa, while not a conflict with Britain per se, the failure of their latest attempt to have the League of Nations grant the annexation of South West Africa promises to be yet another thorn. With at least two Dominion leaders adopting stances hostile or challenging towards London, how will you react?

Aside from the Dominions, perhaps the most pressing issue in terms of the colonies is that of India, its constitutional future very much in doubt and subject to intense, controversial speculation. It is no secret that the British Raj is the most vital part of the Empire and that many – including key parliamentarians, and particularly many Conservatives – are determined to hold onto it. However, the calls not only for autonomy, but for full-blown independence have increased exponentially in the past decade, channeled through leaders like Mahatma Gandhi and the Indian National Congress. It is clear that the present constitutional framework will not hold out for long. How should the issue of India be handled?

Republic of France:


Prime Minister,

Once again, you have shown remarkable flexibility and skill to ensure survival in such politically unstable times: not since Poincare last decade was a premier able to survive two years in office. As this now involves a dramatic shift towards a government of the left, this is all the more remarkable. However, there are still challenges to be met. Finance Minister Blum remains a constant target of rising anti-Semitism across the country, with the far-right emerging as a credible, growing threat. And, in Syria, High Commissioner de Martel reports that even the vaguely pro-French have proved lukewarm to the proposed framework, with the hardline nationalists in the National Bloc threatening riots if France does not concede. What will you do?

Perhaps unexpectedly, the Third Balkan War extends for another year, adding further uncertainty and tension to Europe. Harmed by the Italian blockade and American embargo, the Little Entente appears to be in need of further economic assistance. The Croats have revolted all across Yugoslavia, causing their own civil war. And, in an embarrassing incident, French vessels have been found trying to bypass the Duce’s blockade. Constrained in what you can do due to domestic politics; the Balkan War is truly a challenge worthy of a statesman. How should France handle this volatile situation? And for that matter, how should it react to the events taking place closer to home, across the Spanish Republic?

Following fifteen years under a League of Nations mandate, in which France enjoys the economically profitable control over the local coal mines, the Territory of the Saar Basin is due to hold a plebiscite to decide its future, with the prospect of French annexation being one of three possibilities. There are certainly those in France who believe such a goal can be achieved, convinced the local inhabitants will either refuse to be ruled by Hugenberg, or that they are more ethnically French than many believe. What will France’s attitude and stance be regarding the Saar?

United States of America


Mr. President,

Fresh from only limited setbacks in the midterms - and even gains in the Senate -, the administration can rest a bit easier knowing that the bulk of its New Deal agenda remains reasonably popular. Still, there are problems to be addressed. In a surprise ruling, the conservative-majority Supreme Court – led by Republican Chief Justice Hughes – has just struck down the minimum wage as unconstitutional in a 6-3 vote, as well as other minor regulations. Not only that, more cases are expected to be heard, in which the Justice Department will have to defend further New Deal provisions. Thus far, you have not had any chance to appoint any new Justices. An intense debate has developed in the White House between those who believe action must be taken to address the Court’s conservative position, and those who feel it is best to accept the losses and move on. What will you do?

Easily the most controversial proposal of the past year has been the push to liberalize immigration restrictions, which has sparked a number of nativist protests and has been blamed by some Democrats who lost their races during the midterms as a reason for their defeat. Still, amidst heavy resistance in Congress it’s also clear the bill is popular between immigrant communities in large states like California and New York, which creates a case for preserving on the proposal. What will you do? Should the immigration bill be ditched to pursue other goals, or will the White House double down and seek its passage come what may?

Generally speaking, the public appears to have reacted positively to the recent shift in the administration foreign policy, including the Nicaraguan evacuation and a lack of direct involvement in the current European conflicts. More encouraging still, the Filipino delegation has accepted your terms, paving the way for Philippine Independence if you can get the treaty through Congress. And yet many in the State Department look to the Nicaraguan Civil War and the Chaco War as dangerous conflicts, particularly given their rapidly growing death toll. On the other side of the debate, non-interventionist argue that no European powers appear likely to intervene, and that Washington is better off not meddling. What will you do in regards to these issues?

Soviet Union


Comrade General Secretary,

Whilst industrialization continues and proceeds apace, NKVD Director Yagoda seeks a meeting to deliver a new report. Having spent the last couple of years in exile in Europe, Trotsky appears to have settled himself in France, where the NKVD suspects him of trying to resume contact with his followers and other opposition figures within the party in the Soviet Union, as well as preparing some sort of – as of yet – undetermined project. In light of the recent shift within the French government, and despite the prevailing distrust of socialists like Blum, Yagoda wonders if action should be taken against Trotsky now or whether he can be safely ignored. And, of course, whether the French government would be an ally or a foe in such an action.

One of your personal goals since taking over as General Secretary has been the eradication of the Russian Orthodox Church and of religion in general across the Soviet Union, seeing it as a clear, irrevocable enemy of the state. Thus far, propaganda campaigns have not had much success in promoting anti-religious sentiment, forcing the state to rely on suppression tactics such as the arrest of priests and the destruction of churches. With these tactics having decreased in use lately, the time approaches to make a decision on how to proceed with this campaign. Should the state double down on the use of terror to church the Orthodox Church once and for all? Should propaganda be relied upon despite its previous failure? Or, at the risk of internal party dissent, should the state’s approach be altered entirely?

Aside from Yagoda, the recent elected party leader in Moscow, Nikita Khrushchev, has taken advantage of his recent invitations to your dacha to expose a new development: the apparent forming of a faction. Disappointed by a lack of intervention in China – though this may be tempered by recent reports of Soviet weapon supplies to Hu Hanmin – and elsewhere, it is suggested that some outwardly loyalist party officers are gathering together in support of a vigorous foreign policy, favoring the exportation of Communist through more aggressive means. And while all supposed members of this factor proclaim their loyalty, such a stance might contradict your earlier writings or actions in the subject. Specially, Khrushchev claims the popular party boss in Leningrad Sergei Kirov and General Tukhachevsky belong to this new group. Should Khrushchev be listened to? And what should be done about this group?

Kingdom of Italy


Duce,

Forever unsatisfied ever since the foundation of Yugoslavia over fifteen years ago, the Croats have risen in rebellion against Alexander I all across Croatia. Though not fully united due to the clear differences between the more radical Ustashe (Pavelic) and the more moderate HSS (Macek), it is evident that both Croatian groups look towards Italy as their salvation from the Triple Entente, hoping that Rome will intervene to preserve and secure their future independence. Of course, it is not altogether clear how the Croatians can be assisted without causing further escalation of the war, or what other nations will think about the Yugoslavian Civil War. What will you do?

There is drama in the Adriatic following the Dubrovnik Incident, with sailors from the Regia Marina having captured vessels attempting to bypass the blockade to supply weapons to Yugoslavia and the Entente. By the looks of it, France has been behind this attempt at contradicting your will, a grave offense. To make matters more difficult, although the blockade has been mostly successful it has by no means been foolproof, with evidence suggesting that the Albanians might not be fully complying with it either nor deterred by previous Italian overtures. And, aside from this problem, there is also the matter of recent naval maneuvers close to the Catalan coast, which resulted in a skirmish with loss of life. How should Italy react to all of this?

According to reports from Minister Jung, it is clear that the new, bold economic strategy is starting to pay clear dividends, with the economy showing clear signs of recovery as construction proceeds apace. On the less advantageous side, the deficit – as well as the foreign debt – is growing exponentially, a matter which some believe could be problematic in the long term. More pressingly, Minister Jung worries about the glaring weaknesses of the Italian economy not yet addressed by the new agenda, one of them being the un-modernized nature of Italian agriculture, and the other the distinct lack of oil to fuel much of what’s being built. Will you seek to address any of these perceived weaknesses at the cost of slowing down the current economic agenda, or should it be completed before you move onto new challenges?

Empire of Japan


Your Majesty,

A new government has been forced, cementing the power and influence of the Toseiha faction due to the elevation of Admiral Okada to the Premiership and General Nagata at the War Ministry. The Kodoha faction has been seemingly relegated to a secondary role, with your agents detecting much anger among junior officers yet continued silence within the higher ranking officers. Though the government has yet avoided any repeat of the December 2nd Incident, it will soon be time to make long term decisions, the outcome of which might provoke serious – positive or negative – consequences. With the Kwantung army still battling Zhang Xueliang in Manchukuo, elections due for the coming year, and the question of whether a return to civilian government is possible, there is an open question regarding whether Okada should seek to maintain the current uneasy calm, however troublesome, or pursue a bolder approach. What is you will?

New investment by the Okada government into the Japanese film industry has yielded immediate results, with a joint Japanese-American mega production starring Sessue Hayakawa – Snow Country, based on an original script by writer Yasunari Kawabata – now in the works. Although the film, if internationally successful, could be a major boost for the Japanese film industry, serious problems have arisen with Hollywood due to the recent adoption of the so-called “Hays Code”. Among its many provisions, it forbids miscegenation, thus forbidding Hayawaka to have an on-screen romance with a Caucasian actress. Thus the dilemma: if the movie goes ahead with a multiracial romance, it will not play in the United States. If it does not, it risks Hayakawa not having enough box office draw by himself and the movie to collapse, at a time in which enormous funds have already been invested. What – if anything – should be done about this?

Generally speaking, the presence of the European colonial empires has prevented Japan from wielding much influence thus far in Southeast Asia, but recent developments may be altering such barriers. For one, the Philippines appears to be on the verge of independence from the US. For another, local tension in India and the recent hostility between Australia and Britain also provide what could be openings. There is also the Kingdom of Siam, which has recently experienced some instability. And finally, there’s Manchukuo and puppet emperor Puyi, whose powers and actual autonomy – the Kwantung Army’s initiatives notwithstanding – is not entirely clear. Should any action be taken on this front?
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« Reply #113 on: August 03, 2022, 09:26:49 PM »

Republic of China


Generalissimo,

A most active year in the battlefield has seemingly simplified the complex political outlook, creating, aside from the fight against the Communists, two distinct camps taking sides either for or against your rule. And although the anti-KMT rebels may be divided in northern and southern blocs due to the strategic situation, they have experienced some success in the field and have thus far resisted the bulk of your offensives. How will you conduct operations against the coalitions this year? And furthermore, will you be attempting to draw the Ma and Yunnan Cliques into the war on your side? Or should it be considered too risky to do so?

Despite the failure of amphibious operations against Hu Hanmin, the successful naval blockade of Guangzhou has brought alarming news after naval commanders discovered a steady stream of weapons being supplied to the rebels. As the weapons bear Soviet iconography, the more militant anti-Soviet officers are convinced that Stalin – his lack of action in Xinjiang aside – is trying to undermine your rule though covert rather than direct means. Many within your government are protesting this act of intervention on behalf of your enemies, demanding swift action. What will you do regarding the Soviets?

Although he has been loyal thus far – at least due to his support for the Sino-Japanese Treaty – Wang Jingwei has started to return to his old ways to become a thorn on your side. For one, he opposes growing French influence in China, believing that depending in any western power will only prolong China’s forced subservience to the west. For another, he is most critical about the lack of domestic action, as well as with the growth of the pro-fascist Blue Shirts Society, to the point in which the sight of Wang criticizing its leaders or members and they insulting him back has become a common sight in Nanjing. What should be done about Wang?

Czechoslovak Republic


Mr. President,

Over the past year the frontline moved little, with commanders puzzled regarding Prague’s lack of initiative. As a result, Hungary has survived, but many believe it will not hold out much longer. Decisions, however, must be made. The economy is increasingly crippled from war expenditures, civil war has broken out within Yugoslavia and, due to Czechoslovakia’s geographical position, your ally in Romania has become the main supply and economic lifeline of the nation following the American embargo and hostility from other neighbors. And, of course, commanders will expect input on how operations are to be conducted this year. What are your orders?

With the parliamentary term having come to an end after six years, parliamentary elections are scheduled to be held on May of this year. This poses quite a dilemma due to the ongoing war, as many wonder if the elections should be held and whether parties would be willing to suspend them. If there are to go ahead, there are those who also worry about how ethnic Germans and Hungarians might vote, particularly since the electoral system is not geared to produce majorities but to secure proportionality. Finally, your advisors also wonder if you plan to break tradition and support a party, or whether due to your age – now 85 – it might be time to resign, decide on a successor and hold presidential elections alongside the parliamentary ones. What will you do?

Kingdom of Hungary


Regent,

The war continues, further ruining the Kingdom and killing thousands of its youngest and brightest. However, Hungary still stands against the odds, the Little Entente not having been able to end resistance despite now controlling over half the country. All things considered, Hungarian conscripts have fought well, but the lack of weapons and a lack of clear, direct instructions are, in the minds of the General Staff, two problems that must be addressed if the country is to stand a chance. And, despite Italian and American action doing much to economically harm the Entente, it is clear that the survival of the nation depends on more – far more – foreign support. How will you conduct the war this year, and how will you try to ensure Hungary survives?

The constitutional dilemma, seemingly sidelined due to the outbreak of war, has emerged once again. From his exile in Switzerland, young Archduke Otto has sought permission to enlist in the Hungarian Royal Army and/or to be allowed to do anything he can to support Hungary – with the implication of a desire to see the monarchy restored -, creating a new dilemma. Having Otto back might certainly improve flagging morale and further enhance the unity of the nation, but it is not altogether clear how foreign nations – even those friendly to Hungary – would react to this. What will your response to the Archduke be?

Polish Republic


Minister,

Whilst you wait for your bold agenda to take effect and the outrage over devaluation to die down – though there are early signs of economic benefits – the time has come to hold parliamentary elections, the Sejm elected in 1930 being about to expire. Despite standing behind you thus far due to your ingenious power sharing scheme, it is clear many in Sanation would have you reform the constitution before the elections, as well as altering the electoral system to prevent the opposition from making advances this year. There is also the question of whether the current regime will continue using the “Nonpartisan Bloc for Cooperation with the Government” (BBWR) as its electoral vehicle, whether any Sanation or opposition candidates should be barred from standing, and how you’ll campaign. What will you do?

Thus far, a mixture of propaganda measures and a continuation of Pilsudski’s attitudes towards ethnic minorities in the Republic have blunted some of the usual appeal of the opposition, but it is clear that, in the end, the anti-Sanation opposition remains a sizable threat despite their internal divisions and separate political parties ranging from Socialism to right-wing nationalists. There isn’t a clear consensus on how to best combat them, but thus far, measures to restrict their ability to protest and treason trials for some high profile leaders have worked. Recently, an internment camp has been built at Bereza Kartuska, and its commander – as well as many Sanation officers – speaks glowingly of the camp as a model for repression, suggesting that several camps should be built to take opposition members into protective custody and demoralize those resisting the regime. What should be done about the Polish opposition?

Republic of Turkey


Mr. President,

After five years, it is time to hold elections once again. As with previous contests, your Republican People’s Party (CHP) remains the only legal party, with Turkey remaining a single-party state. Previously, it has proved difficult to allow even a symbolic organized opposition, as said parties – often created in the understanding they will support secularism – inevitably end up hijacked by religious conservatism, and end up banned. Thus, you must decide if it is worth to attempt a multi-party election, or whether the CHP must once again run unopposed for the legislature. Another salient issue relevant to the elections is that of female suffrage, which has recently gained prominence. Your government has expanded the rights of women, but they are yet to gain the right to vote. Will you expand their rights to allow them to vote, or is it better not to risk the potential religious backlash?

Turkey has been most active on the foreign stage, and it has not gone unnoticed. The Balkan Mutual Defense Treaty appears to be firm, and your proposed alliance with your new partners is ready to be unveiled whenever you choose. However, there are still a number of issues to be addressed. One of them is the current unrest in Syria, which may prove of interest given Turkish claims to Hatay Province. Another is the American embargo, which is hurting the Turkish economy badly. Yet another is the Third Balkan War, which seemingly looms closer and closer. And finally, the long desired revisions to Lausanne, which some diplomats believe might now be sought within the context of the League of Nations. How will you handle these challenges?

Kingdom of Romania


Your Majesty,

As far as European monarchs go, you face quite an interesting domestic situation, filled with danger and opportunity. Known as a playboy king, returned to power in 1930 despite having once renounced your succession rights, you and the royal camarilla have long dreamed of an eventual royal dictatorship, made difficult due to the resistance from many corners. In that task, you have done your best to play the major political forces against each other: the centrist National Liberals and National Peasant Party, and the fascist Iron Guard. The latter has been consistently the most fearsome foe, with its violent leader Codreanu having gone as far as having masterminded the assassination of a previous Prime Minister in 1933. Thus far, Prime Minister Tatarescu (of the National Liberals) is subservient to you and has a strong parliamentary majority, giving you some room to maneuver despite the government being technically democratic. How will you navigate these troubled political waters?

Amidst grave doubts, the Cabinet voted only by the narrowest margin to go to war with Hungary alongside the Little Entente back in 1933. Out of all three, Romania has achieved the most, overrunning most of eastern Hungary and, due to the Italian blockade and American embargo, being the lifeline from which most war supplies and funding from friendly sources can reach Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia. Still, the war has gone on for longer than expected, significantly hurting the economy. Not only that, Transylvania – home to a large ethnically Hungarian population – is a source of endless strife, riots and sabotage due to their opposition to the war. With Yugoslavia weakened after the Croat uprising, Romania could well in a position to seize informal leadership of the Entente if you play your cards right. How should the war be conducted this year?

Spanish Republic


Prime Minister,

Revolution has broken out, raising the prospect of civil war and even the breakup of the Spanish Republic itself. In Asturias, the miners and workers Soviet has defeated attempts by the Army to suppress them, expanding into the Basque Country. In Catalonia, Premier Companys leads a struggle for Catalan independence, and has marshalled a respectable amount of military resources. It is not clear whether further uprisings could succeed, or whether the Republican left will not rise against the government. It now falls on to you to handle this most delicate situation, as well as to decide on whether to listen to those advisors who’d seek the broadest possible international coalition and a long term approach to calm down the situation, and those – like General Franco, unofficial advisor to the Minister of War – who’d have you stop relying on working-class soldiers to call on the colonial army to immediately suppress the enemy, regardless of the cost. How should the situation be handled?

In spite of your charisma and political skill having enabled you to survive over a year in office despite not winning the 1933 elections, it must be said that your position – and that of your Radical Republican Party – is unenviable in many ways. Weakened by internal defections from left-leaning members, your government depends on legislative support from the Catholic right (CEDA), as well as other minor parties, with CEDA being unwilling to sign on to major reforms. President Alcalá-Zamora is rather outspoken in his distrust of you and unwillingness to cooperate, finding you to close to CEDA and the right. Clearly, it will take fortitude to keep the government going and to make it functional, even without the background of the Revolution. How will you attempt to achieve this?

Dominion of Canada


Prime Minister,

Against the odds, you have bested Mackenzie King for the second time and remained Prime Minister with a small but workable majority, the Newfoundland Referendum going a long way to secure your victory over the Liberals. You will now return to Parliament to promote your agenda, safe in the knowledge you have some time for measures to take effect. Perhaps the most pressing concern is that of Newfoundland’s integration, as you will have to consider how to best enact it, whether to hold immediate by-elections, and so forth. And, while domestically the measure is very popular with English Canadians, it has caused friction within Québec, which has outstanding claims on parts of Labrador. Indeed, most politicians in the province – which is set to hold provincial elections this year – demand the immediate transfer of claimed territories to Québec. How will you handle this issue?

Union of South Africa


Prime Minister,

Despite your best efforts, a motion at the League of Nations that would have solved the South West Africa matter in your favor has been voted down by Germany, closing down the easiest route to annexation. Whilst you decide on how to proceed, the domestic repercussions of this have been immediate, as the German veto has delivered a harsh blow to the opposition National Party, whose leading members – including leader and former PM J. B. M. Hertzog – are known to have pro-German views. In light of their weakening, some advisors wonder if it might be a good opportunity to force a proposed fusion of your South African Party with the Nationals on terms favorable to you. Others, more daring, suggest the prospect of an early election to bury the Nationals and expand your narrow majority in parliament, at the risk of a potentially unpredictable campaign. What should be done about the National Party? And will you seek another route to annex South West Africa?

Commonwealth of Australia


Prime Minister,

Your early efforts have certainly not lacked visibility, as despite Australia’s relatively junior role in the Commonwealth you have managed to become quite the noteworthy advocate for women’s suffrage in Europe and North America. And although the suspension of British debt payments has spark anger from the opposition and alarm in your remaining critics within Labor, the issue of the day is by far your proposed Commonwealth National Health Service. Having it passed it through the House amidst the cheers of the public – as the bill is thought to be highly popular – it has now stalled in the Senate amidst incessant opposition from the medical community, who refuse to even allow the Western Australia pilot under fears of “the socialization of medicine”. Additionally, the High Court has pre-emptively warned the government does not have the legal powers to fund healthcare services, threatening to kill the bill if passed. With the fate of the CHS at risk, what will you do?

Kingdom of Bulgaria


Your Majesty,

It has been a most turbulent year. Following a coup last May in which the civilian government was overthrown by the Zveno, a nationalist and republican group of military officers – whose agenda included corporatism and a vaguely pro-French foreign policy – you have just managed to turn the tables on them with the help of friendly officers, leaving Bulgaria at the crossroads. After years of mismanagement, Bulgarians cry for strong leadership, and the opportunity is there – should you wish it – to either install autocratic, personal rule, or return to constitutional government. Aside from this critical choice, decisions must be made on the dismal state of the economy, as well as how Bulgaria is to align given the current volatile situation of the Balkans. What are your orders?
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NewYorkExpress
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« Reply #114 on: August 03, 2022, 09:43:46 PM »

President Roosevelt submitted the treaty agreed to with Fillipino Leaders last autumn to the United States Senate.

President Roosevelt also, in response to the Minimum Wage legislation being struck down by the Supreme Court, asks Congress to pass legislation that would strip the Supreme Court of any jurisdiction to hear cases challenging any other New Deal legislation.
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KaiserDave
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« Reply #115 on: August 03, 2022, 10:11:48 PM »
« Edited: August 04, 2022, 11:49:57 AM by KaiserDave »

Statements from the Italian Foreign Office



We are issuing our full support for the legitimate Spanish Government of Señor Lerroux, who is waging a commendable crusade against the forces of anarchy, Bolshevism, and atheism. It is only with strong and honest men like the Spanish Prime Minister that the barbaric hordes of Bolshevists who threaten to destroy European civilization will be defeated. Signor Mussolini provides brotherly greetings and announces that the Kingdom of Italy will approve a military mission to Madrid led by General Italo Gariboldi to consult with the Spanish government on military matters and provide strategic advice.

The Kingdom of Italy officially recognizes the Republic of Croatia as a legitimate state and the only legitimate representation of the Croatian people. Italy plans to act accordingly. Italy is entering diplomatic talks on the subject of naval incidents in the region.

Duce Benito Mussolini
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NewYorkExpress
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« Reply #116 on: August 03, 2022, 10:37:53 PM »

President Roosevelt has proposed that the United States pick a city to bid for either the 1940 Summer/Winter Olympics (
host to be decided in 1936) or 1944 Summer/Winter Olympics (host to be decided in 1939).
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iBizzBee
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« Reply #117 on: August 04, 2022, 07:52:41 AM »



Lang Rails against the Senate, the 'Big Fella' Threatens to push for abolition if Health Care bill isn't passed

Perth, Western Australia, - After the passage of his bill to broad applause in the Australian House for the establishment of a Commonwealth Health Service (CHS) pilot program in Western Australia to explore the concept of creating a similar program nationwide in the future, Lang has railed against the 'do-nothing, feckless, corrupt' Senate in a massive Labor rally in the Western Australian Capital and Metropole of Perth, threatening to go so far as pushing for a referendum on Senate abolition if his Healthcare bill isn't passed.

"The Great Depression has left a great many thousands of our fellow countrymen, many who are citizens in otherwise good standing, destitute and unable to afford the services of a private doctor. This has left children sick with disease in our inner cities, it has led Australian men unable to attend work, Mothers unable to attend to their familial and civic duties, and so much further suffering among our people during already difficult times.

Your newly established Labor government, with a critical eye first and for most to the well-being of the great people of this Commonwealth, has put forth an ambitious proposal to both expand facilities for health and medical services in our communities and provide government funding for the most destitute among us to receive care at these facilities. We believe it's this type of bold leadership that is necessary during these tumultuous times.

However, beucratic and antiquated forces in our Senate are determined to hold back the peoples will, expressed in our newly established mandate, to take bold action to put an end to the suffering of our people during the present economic crisis.

To them I say: I do not think you will be able long to fool the Australian people as to your purposes. You will either bend to the will of the people or see yourselves on the opposite side of the wrath of the great Australian majority, the great laboring majority, and the Senate shall not like to see those consequences if they choose that path."


Lang has announced that ministers in his government intended to submit legislation again in the following month to establish a pilot program for the 'CHS' in Western Australia. While the government would whip its members to the furthest of its abilities, and was even making appeals to rural Senators in the National Party, Lang also personally met with multiple long-time Senators in his party and the opposition to threaten that he would lead a campaign for Senate abolition if his Healthcare bill was shot down.
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iBizzBee
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« Reply #118 on: August 04, 2022, 08:02:57 AM »



Australia prepares to welcome British, American delegations to Canberra

Canberra, ACT - Fresh off the heels of a victorious election campaign, the newly established Australian Labor government headed by Prime Minister Jack 'JT' Lang has announced that his government is making preparations for the arrival of both British & American delegations in Canberra within the coming months.

The British visit is expected to cover recent conversations regarding trade regulations, rumors being that the newly elected Lang government has been skeptical of free trade proposals suggested by British PM Ramsay and has pushed for further protections of Australian workers. Furthermore, with a recently announced 4 year suspension of debt repayments, Lang has laid out a tough line, insisting on the British 'responsibility' to its Daughter country to assist during difficult economic times. Negotiators believe a proposal regarding resource extraction and British investment could be possible in exchange for debt relief, but this remains to be seen.

Rumors surrounding the American visit, which is part of a multi-country tour by newly confirmed Treasurer Henry Wallace are more rare, but suggest that Lang shares many domestic and foreign similarities with Wallace and could push for increased ties between the Roosevelt administration and Canberra.
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GoTfan
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« Reply #119 on: August 04, 2022, 08:48:30 AM »

Following a productive meeting in Sevastopol, Comrade Stalin and Turkish President Kemal Ataturk have agreed to release the following Joint Statement on the Conflict in Eastern Europe:

Quote
The people and governments of the Soviet Union and Republic of Turkey stand in solidarity with the nations of the Balkans against the meddling of Italy, and unequivocally condemn the needless escalation that is the Italian naval blockade.

The nations of Czechoslovakia and Romania are undertaking pre-emptive operations to ensure their security against the expansionist Horthy, who would have undoubtedly attempted to invade both countries himself to restore the empire he rambles so nostalgically about.

The Soviet Union and Republic of Turkey will do what must be done to ensure the security of the Balkan states against external interference.

x Joseph Stalin, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
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DKrol
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« Reply #120 on: August 04, 2022, 07:06:00 PM »

The Prime Minister announces that by-elections will be held in Newfoundland and Labrador in April, for seven seats.

On the issue of the Quebec-Labrador border dispute, the Prime Minister contends that the 1927 Privy Council decision on the border is the controlling decision. The Prime Minister does not believe that he has the unilateral authority to override a multi-decade decision of the Privy Council. If a majority of the Parliament, including the newly elected Newfoundlander MPs, were to support a motion to adjust the border, then the Prime Minister would be obliged to see that decision through.
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RGM2609
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« Reply #121 on: August 04, 2022, 08:23:52 PM »

Special address by Chancellor Alfred Hugenberg

My fellow Germans,

During the past months, worrying reports of famine have reached the Western world, coming from the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. In light of this, Germany has considered that swift international action is necessary in order to prevent the Bolsheviks from covering a genocide. Far from being open to investigation, like any state which has done nothing wrong would be, Stalin's government has vehemently opposed any kind of oversight and got the French to block said motion. I trust this proves the folly of the Bolshevik system for all to see, they can not feed their own citizens but refuse international help out of the fear of tarnishing their image. This shall be a lesson for those who thought Germany would be better off under Stalin's puppets.

I wanted to believe, despite my prior reservations, that the League of Nations could be a force of good and help make the world a better place, which is why I submitted this motion. However, it has proven itself to be worthless, infiltrated by Bolsheviks and Socialists, unable to lift a finger in support of the suppressed Ukrainian people. My government will not allow Germany to legitimize this charade of an organisation any longer. This is why I am announcing the German withdrawal from the League of Nations, effective immediately. This decision does not mean that Germany is no longer open to international cooperation, on the contrary. It firmly believes in the necessity of an Europe united in goals, especially in face of the Soviet threat. We just refuse to work on the terms of the Bolsheviks and their Western enablers any longer. Soon, we will announce the formation of an anti-Comintern Pact, and invite nations from around the world to join it. This organisation will seek to serve as a vanguard against Communism, that my government has already tried to be.

To end tonight's address, I would like to extend my prayers to the people of Ukraine and urge you too to pray for them and for the Lord to make them surpass these dark times, and to also pray that this fate never engulfs Germany or the rest of Europe.

Thank you for your attention,
Alfred Hugenberg
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NewYorkExpress
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« Reply #122 on: August 04, 2022, 11:14:02 PM »

President Roosevelt has asked Secretary of the Navy Claude Swanson to provide naval advisers for a Japanese epic movie based on the battle of Tsushima.

The U.S Navy base at Pearl Harbor will be made available as a possible filming location along with all ships and crew, should the film's production crew request it.
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RGM2609
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« Reply #123 on: August 05, 2022, 12:18:13 AM »

The German Reich officially recognizes and establishes diplomatic relations with the Republic of Croatia.
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Senator Spiral
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« Reply #124 on: August 05, 2022, 01:42:52 AM »

Following a productive meeting in Sevastopol, Comrade Stalin and Turkish President Kemal Ataturk have agreed to release the following Joint Statement on the Conflict in Eastern Europe:

Quote
The people and governments of the Soviet Union and Republic of Turkey stand in solidarity with the nations of the Balkans against the meddling of Italy, and unequivocally condemn the needless escalation that is the Italian naval blockade.

The nations of Czechoslovakia and Romania are undertaking pre-emptive operations to ensure their security against the expansionist Horthy, who would have undoubtedly attempted to invade both countries himself to restore the empire he rambles so nostalgically about.

The Soviet Union and Republic of Turkey will do what must be done to ensure the security of the Balkan states against external interference.

x Joseph Stalin, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

X Mustafa Kemal, President of the Republic of Turkey
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