Why did Hoover win Oklahoma so big in 1928?
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  Why did Hoover win Oklahoma so big in 1928?
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Author Topic: Why did Hoover win Oklahoma so big in 1928?  (Read 630 times)
Asenath Waite
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« on: January 12, 2022, 02:52:32 PM »

It doesn’t surprise me that he won it given his gains in other southern states and anti-Catholicism but the fact that he won by nearly 30 points is kind of hard to believe. I would think that in that era any Democrat would have a fairly high ceiling, even Smith.
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discovolante
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2022, 03:17:44 PM »

As far as I can tell, Oklahoma (long one of the most Evangelical-heavy states in the Union) just really was that anti-Catholic. The fact that it also swung quite a fair deal to the right from '56 to '60 would seem to corroborate this.
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mollybecky
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2022, 04:31:58 PM »

The evangelical support for Hoover in 1928 spilled into TX as well. 

Remarkable is the massive swing back to the Democrats in 1932--a 74 point swing in OK (+28R to +46D) and an 81 point swing in TX (+4R to +77D).
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TDAS04
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2022, 05:29:22 PM »

The Outer South was already more swingy than such Deep South states as South Carolina and Mississippi.  I'm guessing that while the Outer South was also mainly Democratic, fewer black people meant that there were fewer white "yellow dog" Democrats would would vote Democratic no matter what, to make a point about "white supremacy."

Also, Oklahoma could have been even more anti-Catholic than other states, considering how poorly JFK did there in 1960.
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Anthropogenic-Statism
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2022, 12:51:06 PM »

As much as I doubt this, it's worth throwing the theory that Charles Curtis had particular appeal to Native Americans into the discussion.
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Asenath Waite
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« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2022, 06:27:33 AM »

As much as I doubt this, it's worth throwing the theory that Charles Curtis had particular appeal to Native Americans into the discussion.

Wouldn’t surprise me if that had some small impact on the margin.
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TDAS04
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« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2022, 02:02:45 PM »

As much as I doubt this, it's worth throwing the theory that Charles Curtis had particular appeal to Native Americans into the discussion.

Maybe, but oddly enough, the big reservations in my state flipped for Smith, after having gone overwhelmingly for Coolidge four years prior.
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Asenath Waite
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« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2022, 03:46:59 PM »

As much as I doubt this, it's worth throwing the theory that Charles Curtis had particular appeal to Native Americans into the discussion.

Maybe, but oddly enough, the big reservations in my state flipped for Smith, after having gone overwhelmingly for Coolidge four years prior.

Was it a different tribe? I can imagine different tribes might have differing political leanings at times.
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TDAS04
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2022, 03:50:50 PM »

As much as I doubt this, it's worth throwing the theory that Charles Curtis had particular appeal to Native Americans into the discussion.

Maybe, but oddly enough, the big reservations in my state flipped for Smith, after having gone overwhelmingly for Coolidge four years prior.

Was it a different tribe? I can imagine different tribes might have differing political leanings at times.

Yes, I didn't mean to imply a connection to Oklahoma, just found it interesting.
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Asenath Waite
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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2022, 03:53:56 PM »

As much as I doubt this, it's worth throwing the theory that Charles Curtis had particular appeal to Native Americans into the discussion.

Maybe, but oddly enough, the big reservations in my state flipped for Smith, after having gone overwhelmingly for Coolidge four years prior.

Was it a different tribe? I can imagine different tribes might have differing political leanings at times.

Yes, I didn't mean to imply a connection to Oklahoma, just found it interesting.

I do as well, would be interesting to look at the possible political divides, like maybe the Kansas tribes were more hostile to prohibition.
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