The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)
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  The Gathering Storm, Redux - Gameplay Thread (WW2 - Early 1940)
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Lumine
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« Reply #375 on: October 26, 2022, 03:22:51 AM »

Sino-Japanese War
Bloody siege at Shanghai ends with Japanese victory,
Zhang surprises with Manchurian offensive, counterattack blunted,
Signs of internal disruption within the ROC, naval blockade established

Following the conclusion of the first few battles of the newly reignited Sino-Japanese conflict – this time featuring the Chiang-Zhang duo jointly resisting Tokyo -, both sides geared up for what promised to be a major, long-term conflict. Partly due to high civilian and international casualties, most of the eyes of the world were forced on the city of Shanghai, in which the sizable Japanese garrison remained hard-pressed facing a siege from much larger NRA forces. The siege or battle for Shanghai was to last for several months and up to the end of the year, with staggering casualties on both sides. The initiative remained with the Chinese for the first few weeks, launching mass assault after mass assault and slowly gaining ground – fighting over every single house and street – in the process. Indeed, it took far longer than expected for the defenders to solidify their frontlines, with high Chinese morale overcoming severe attrition from battlefield casualties. Whilst the battle for Shanghai raged, other units of the IJN proceeded to establish a full military blockade of Chinese ports, virtually cutting off the flow of weapons and supplies to the Chinese Nationalists.

The Imperial Japanese Navy, meant to have played a larger role in the initial stages of the battle at Shanghai, was kept out of the fighting whilst the Chinese air force – bolstered by recent French training – kept up fierce resistance. It took the intervention of the much feared Japanese aircraft carriers – one of which, Akagi, was heavily damaged by a lucky hit – and their highly trained crews for aerial supremacy to be finally established, after which naval gunfire only amplified enemy casualties. Near the end of the year, and with thousands – or dozens of thousands – dead across the battered streets of the metropolis, Japanese forces executed a complex yet highly successful series of landings, threatening to outflank the Chinese positions and forcing their withdrawal. Although Japan has paid a dear price for the city, the Chinese forces retreat in far worse shape, conceding a key logistics hub for future operations and leaving the capital of Nanjing vulnerable to attack. Simultaneously, the IJN struck across the Chinese coastline, resulting in several fierce battles for control over the remaining seaports as Japanese troops prepared to land.

Despite a heavily publicized blunder at Qingdao and Fuzhou, the sole remaining ports – other than Guangzhou, under warlord control - to remain open after costly landings failed, all other Japanese attempts managed to overcome local resistance, enabling Tokyo to establish multiple bridgeheads. Surprised by a further lack of resistance, the Imperial Japanese Army was able to expand all bridgeheads over the next two weeks, only to discover that retreating enemy forces had done their best to plunder and burn abandoned ground. Although the route for further expansion thus remains open, Japanese forces will undoubtedly face a logistical hurdle to secure more ground. As these battles continue within the Chinese mainland proper, morale at the ROC has been significantly hit by battlefield setbacks, controversy over the suspension of land reform in certain zones – with unrest being fueled by mysterious propaganda – and an unexpected underperformance by Chinese currency, as counterfeit bills appear to be flooding into major cities. On the other hand, observers report that anti-Japanese sentiment remains at an all-time high, particularly as – in spite of public efforts by Tokyo to pursue restraint – tales of savagery in the field by the IJA have not subsided.

Ultimately, the most dramatic events of the first year of the war were to take place in Manchuria. Recognizing the apparent futility of their southern push following grievous losses and glaring material inadequacies, ROC and Northern Coalition commanders jointly suspended the advance, resorting instead to defensive warfare as large lines of trenches and fortifications have emerged across the new border. Over the coming weeks, both the Chinese and Japanese forces have done their best to bait each other into assaulting defensive positions, all while trying to cut their respective supply lines through the use of the Japanese air force or Chinese guerrilla units. Thus, only limited amounts of ground have been traded, most assaults – usually the result of local officers taking the initiative – ending in costly, failed ventures. Up north, the Young Marshal himself took the initiative, gathering his best units to lead an offensive into Jehol Province and Inner Manchuria itself. Despite the seemingly unsurmountable logistical challenge, Zhang showed proof of ingenuity by using a large labor corps of carriers, with thousands of civilians – and animals – keeping a manual supply line open to keep the Northern Coalition armies moving.

This offensive seemingly coincided with Tokyo’s strategic interpretation of the war, for the IJN repeatedly ceded ground to Zhang and enabled the Young Marshal – who led his own forces in the field – to overrun Jehol and come dangerously close to breaking out into Manchuria proper. This, in turn, was to be followed by a carefully prepared Japanese counteroffensive, with the planned objective of isolating and encircling its seemingly overextended enemy. This proved to be challenging from the start. Although a planned pro-Zhang uprising to paralyze Manchukuo failed – with heavy casualties for the militiamen -, militia units were able to execute a raid against Japanese commander Hideki Tojo, heavily injuring the General and disrupting the enemy command structure. The Japanese air force, so successful in Shanghai proper, found it difficult to hit Zhang’s supply lines due to their autonomy from mechanization, forcing pilots to overexert themselves trying to identify supply columns as Zhang’s own airmen – lacking suitable planes but not skilled pilots after an influx of foreign volunteers – made their own aerial kills.

By the time the Japanese counteroffensive started, initial battlefield success was clear as Japanese tanks – many of them German-made – proved efficient at overcoming Chinese firepower, bringing Zhang’s advance to a halt. Unfortunately, the same terrain that enabled the Chinese to fight unconventionally made the use of tanks a logistical nightmare, with vehicles breaking down over the sand and rugged terrain. Oddly enough, it was Japanese ingenuity – matching that of Zhang – that turned the counteroffensive’s failure into a mere stall, with bicycle infantry overcoming the limitations of mechanized units. In the end, the onset of winter forced a temporal lull in fighting. The IJN had kept Zhang out of the larger cities in Manchuria, but Inner Mongolia had been lost and the Young Marshal’s forces, at least for now, were nowhere near encircled.

As Prague recovers, Bucharest plunges
Unprecedented international action salvages Czech economy,
Despite averting continental disaster, Romanian economy crashes next,
Resulting fallout leads to government defeat at polls, King Carol loses influence

Whilst the Prague Stock Exchange plunged further into disaster and the Czech society, paralyzed by government gridlock, into further despair, many economists feared the crisis could well spiral into a repeat of 1930, a blow whose consequences – particularly as many nations are yet to fully recover – were terrifying to consider. Their fears were largely answered through unlikely diplomatic cooperation, with the failure of recent efforts – particularly in terms of influencing US economic policy towards Europe – being suddenly reversed following the so-called Krakow Conference. In an unprecedented effort – which, insiders claim, almost led to President Koc toppling Daladier for the Nobel Peace Prize -, four of Europe’s main powers were to join forces to establish the so-called “European Monetary Fund”, an organization that would provide the necessary loans to salvage Czechoslovakia and, arguably, most of Central Europe in the process.

Although an attempt to recruit a high-profile economist to lead the EMF was to fail and the exclusion of Germany caused controversy, the organization had sufficient clout through the variety of its backers – Daladier, Chamberlain, Mussolini and Koc – to overcome the sheer novelty of its mission and goals. Despite local controversy – squaring off those relieved by international action to those decrying the EMF as a “humiliation” -, the minority Petka government was able to push an economic recovery plan relying on the EMF through parliament with the unexpected support of the local Fascist deputies, enabling the rescue loan – governed by a series of limitations and regulations – to go through. In spite of a general belief that a general election is inevitable, the Prague Stock Exchanged slowly recovered some of its lost ground, and the Czech economy, while still crippled, has successfully avoided a US-style collapse.

The foundation and first mission of the EMF has undoubtedly raised the international clout of all four of its founding members, though at the cost of not-insignificant domestic blowback over spending being routed to Prague. Whether the organization has a future beyond its Czech operation is likely to be tested in the near future, as the same scenes of drama that took place in Prague have now gone over to Bucharest. Already heavily damaged by the Depression, the Romanian economy was further hurt by the Third Balkan War, the US embargo and an apparent lack of a clear economic direction, a problem that only grew larger and larger until it burst. The cause, in this case, was the prospect of war between Romania and Britain as a result of the Middle East oil crisis, a prospect that, through eventually eased through the Treaty of Istanbul, sparked sufficient fears to provoke a panicked reaction at the Bucharest Stock Exchange.

The resulting fall in stocks immediately spiraled into a full-blown crash all too reminiscent of Prague, an economic crisis that soon engulfed the country and drove already high unemployment into socially explosive levels. This, unfortunately for the incumbent government, was to coincide with the General Election, right at a time in which the ruling PNL had not yet decided on a firm economic policy or taken sides on the debate over autarky. The PNL subsequently crashed at the polls, delivering a large and previously unexpected victory to former PM Iuliu Maniu and his - also relatively centrist – PNT. Not coincidentally, the crash has also greatly empowered local far-right leader Codreanu, whose Iron Guard almost outpolled the PNL. In the aftermath of the election, and as local politicians debate on whether to impose austerity, and whether to seek a bailout either from Ankara or the EMF, likely PM Maniu seems set for a conflict with King Carol, whose authority has been greatly weakened by recent events.

1937 Romanian General Election:

Party   Votes (%)   Seats
National Peasants Party34% (+22)143 (+116)
National Liberal Party29% (-26)116 (-184)
Iron Guard21% (NEW)75
Magyar Party5%15 (+7)
National Christian Party4% (NEW)8
Others10%30
Total387 MPs

Incoming Prime Minister:
TBD (NAP)

Incoming Government:
TBD

The Protectionist Revolt
Rise of free trade diplomacy sparks backlash in Europe,
Agrarian parties on the rise as rural areas turn towards protectionism,
Trade unions and workers incensed, strikes and protests in urban areas,
France at the center-stage, Central Europe also faces blowback


As recently as 1933, attempts in Western Europe to liberalize trade and overturn the wave of protectionism that had emerged – with substantial popular support – after the Depression, were met with significant backlash both in France and the UK, even causing friction within the Commonwealth. As nations – most of them – have continued to recover at least to some degree, this push for free trade and less restrictions have only deepened as 1937 moved on, resulting in an odd combination of crowning trade achievements coupled with political consequences particularly felt in France and across Central Europe. The Polish Republic proved to be the lesser affected country, having both contained some of its multiple trade deals to industrial goods and having enacted – just in time – a highly ambitious agricultural plan which, while enormously expensive – and only partially implemented -, contained resentment in the agricultural sector over a loosening of restrictions. On the other hand, similar measures were not as successful for the industrial sector, coinciding with an unexpected revival in activity – for unknown reasons – in the Polish opposition. As a result, though President Koc remains popular, a combination of industrial strikes and opposition marches offers a first sign of dissent.

Matters escalated further in Germany, Bulgaria and Turkey, all of which subscribed separate agreements that sparked protests in major industrial and urban centers, protesting what many workers or trade unions have dubbed an “unfair” economic strategy. Hungary would have likely seen such protests, were it not for the distraction offered by the crowning of the new Hapsburg King and, perhaps more crucially, the economic despair and hope for a German lifeline outweighing long term concerns. Ultimately, it was in France that the political storm erupted to its harshest level. What was to be a crowning, historical achievement by President Daladier in the signing of the Franco-Belgian-Luxembourg Customs and Currency Union, a near unprecedented – only matched by the defunct Latin Monetary Union – effort that would link all three economies in drastic ways. The news, strongly championed by Daladier’s Radicals and by pro-business leaders, met with outright disdain from French farmers – none too keen to see trade barriers gone – and even from French workers, a movement that had proved previously crucial for the government.

The National Assembly, already heated due to debates on police crackdowns, the far-right, and other highly controversial issues, became a space almost devoid of calm, with previously supportive independents and even several SFIO – and/or leftist – deputies turning against Daladier. The same protests and strikes seen in Eastern and Central Europe were matched across Paris, Lyon and other such cities, with the added complexity of rural mobilization and intense pressure being exerted on government and opposition deputies, scenes which were also seen in Brussels as well. And although the separate oppositions to incumbent governments have done their best to side with either workers or farmers, or champion economic protectionism – those not previously bound to side with free trade -, public frustration has been enough to warrant the formation or growth of so-called “Agrarian” parties, as well as far-right or far-left organizations.

With the Hungarian and Romanian elections having already featured electoral growth of such groups, and with the so-called “Protectionist Revolt” – thus dubbed by Hearst Media correspondents -, many wonder just how much it will grow, and whether incumbent governments will double down or back down on the free trade approach.

Borah’s First Year
FDR trial in progress, Washington DC on edge,
President charts moderate course, New Deal down but not out,
Concerns over long-term agenda, questions arise over Borah’s vision

Although not as joyful and crowd-packed as FDR’s inauguration back in 1933, William Borah and Theodore Roosevelt Jr. could be well said to have had a respectable opening to their Administration, a surprisingly civic act between Borah and outgoing President Garner in light of the contentious election and impeachment trials. Crucially, President Garner’s postponement of a decision on whether to pardon Roosevelt – in effect outsourcing the responsibility to the incoming administration – led to Borah’s firm decision not to pardon the controversial former President, resulting in a bribery trial starting in the middle of the year and attracting heavy involvement from the media. While in the short term, the refusal to pardon FDR has been bitterly criticized by moderates in both parties – citing a desire to spare the country from a painful trial -, anecdotal evidence suggests the decision may not have been badly received by the electorate, a large part of which appears to remain resentful over FDR’s perceived “betrayal” of the public trust.

For the most part, newspapers have proved willing to portray the President as someone keen to restore such trust, but there has been no shortage of accusations that a pardon was only denied to further embarrass the beleaguered Democratic Party with the trial. Recognizing the difficulty posed by being on the legislative minority, Borah has surprised observers by refusing to take on Congress head on, proving instead to be a reasonably effective negotiator while portraying his Administration as keeping Congress in check. This lack of controversy and major political fights, in turn, has helped the Borah Administration avoid major missteps thus far, while raising future issues of its own. Thus far, Borah has seemed content to let the Supreme Court take the lead in moderating – some would say emasculating – the still popular New Deal, focusing on addressing inefficient programs rather than, as many conservative Republicans – chief among them former President Hoover – attempting to destroy the program as a whole.

Despite a popular – if risky – refusal to partake in attempts to bail out European economies, foreign policy has proved a source of headaches, with refusals to restrict the power of the arms industry and opposition to constitutional amendments further empowering Congress disappointing isolationist groups, many of which expect Borah to be more strident in the cause of taking America away from “foreign adventures and war profiteering”. Perhaps more importantly, a relatively calm first year in office is yet to reveal a clear motivation – for the public, that is – and vision that sustains the Borah administration, the more evident downside of the President’s extremely measured approach. With 1938 approaching, and it with, the midterm elections, Borah will face a difficult decision on whether to maintain the moderate approach or undertake a more ideological agenda, with the Republican Party not yet convinced on which course of action might prevent the usual losses experienced by every President.
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« Reply #376 on: March 05, 2023, 05:59:43 PM »
« Edited: March 16, 2023, 09:31:33 PM by Lumine »

Turn VI: 1938


The Cast:

German Reich: Chancellor Alfred Hugenberg (RGM2609)
United States of America: President William Borah (S019)
British Empire: Prime Minister Edward Wood, Viscount Halifax (Dereich)
Soviet Union: Chairman Mikhail Tukhachevsky (Lakigigar)
Empire of Japan: Emperor Hirohito (Devout Centrist)
Republic of France: Prime Minister Edouard Daladier (YPestis25)
Kingdom of Italy: Duce Benito Mussolini (KaiserDave)
Republic of China: Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek (Kuumo)
Republic of Turkey: President Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (Spiral)
Union of South Africa: Prime Minister Jan Smuts (Ishan)
Kingdom of Hungary: King Otto II Hapsburg (AverageFoodEnthusiast)
Polish Republic: President Adam Koc (Windjammer)
Kingdom of Romania: King Carol II Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (Muaddib)
Kingdom of Bulgaria: Tsar Boris III Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (OBD)
Abyssinian Empire: Emperor Haile Selassie (New York Express)
Commonwealth of Australia: Prime Minister Billy Hughes (GoTfan)
Dominion of Canada: Prime Minister R. B. Bennett (DKrol)

Economic Performance:
Polish Republic: High
British Empire: Moderate
Empire of Japan: Moderate
Kingdom of Italy: Moderate
Union of South Africa: Moderate
Republic of France: Moderate
German Reich: Moderate
United States of America: Moderate
Dominion of Canada: Moderate

Soviet Union: Weak
Republic of Turkey: Weak
Kingdom of Bulgaria: Weak
Commonwealth of Australia: Weak
Republic of China: Weak
Abyssinian Empire: Weak

Kingdom of Romania: Very Weak
Kingdom of Hungary: Very Weak

Popularity:
President Kemal: Very High
Chancellor Hugenberg: Very High

Tsar Boris III: High
Duce Mussolini: High
King Otto II: High
Generalissimo Chiang: High
Emperor Hirohito: High
Prime Minister Smuts: High
President Koc: High
Prime Minister Bennett: High

President Borah: Moderate
Prime Minister Daladier: Moderate
Prime Minister Lang: Moderate
King Carol II: Moderate
Emperor Halie Selassie: Moderate

Chairman Tukhachevsky: Low
Prime Minister Halifax: Low

Mobilization Level:
Total Mobilization: None
War Mobilization: Republic of China, Empire of Japan
Partial Mobilization: None
Conscription: Republic of France, Soviet Union, Spanish Republic, Polish Republic, Kingdom of Bulgaria, German Reich, Republic of Turkey, Kingdom of Italy, Kingdom of Hungary, Kingdom of Romania
Volunteer Army: United States of America, British Empire, Union of South Africa, Commonwealth of Australia, Abyssinian Empire, Dominion of Canada
Demilitarized: None

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« Reply #377 on: March 05, 2023, 06:02:40 PM »
« Edited: March 06, 2023, 09:12:39 PM by Lumine »

German Reich:


Chancellor,

It has been a year of unexpected triumphs for the Reich, ranging from the successful Berlin Olympics – despite the onerous cost of rebuilding the capital – to, most notably, the long-desired Anschluss between Austria and the Reich. Having started in a shaky position, it could be said that your domestic standing has never been stronger after the new National Day celebration, but with times changing so fast it is no time to rest on one’s laurels. The Saar remains occupied, with acts of defiance by local inhabitants growing more violent each day. The conservative old guard takes on an increasingly expansionist tone on its speeches at the Diet, demanding the return of Germany’s old colonies. And others still suggest it is time Germany rebuilds its own alliance bloc, finding new and solid partners for the future. What will you do?

Despite this domestic rise in popularity, isolated pockets of defiance have reared their head during the first weeks of the year. On one side, the purge of the local Churches has sparked far more resistance than originally thought possible, with several Catholic and Protestant bishops speaking out against the government from the pulpit and causing strain with the Vatican, and in the Imperial Diet with the former Zentrum and BVP members. On the other, the signing of free trade arrangements has sparked a reaction from workers and the remnants of the trade unions. Just this week, an illegal gathering saw hundreds of workers marching on the streets of Dresden with your former ally Gregor Strasser at their head, demanding a protectionist policy and better working conditions in the factories. How should they be dealt with?

The absorption of the Austrian economy and its assets has done a great deal in alleviating pressure on the German economy and avert what may have become a crisis, but the Reich is still far away from meaningful prosperity. Unemployment may be reasonably low, but inflation is rising and the stock market is still terrified over the Romanian crash and the possibility the Czech economy may yet go under. Germany has also acquired new responsibilities in supplying new allies and, in particular, in assisting with the reconstruction of Hungary, a difficult balancing act that the Reichsbank increasingly struggles to fulfill. How will you handle these economic difficulties?

British Empire:


Prime Minister,

Welcome into office. As the first peer to become PM in forty years, you face a difficult yet not insurmountable task, and one that demands rapid decision-making. Although the Conservative Party commands a firm majority in the House of Commons and Parliament can last until 1941, the government has taken a major popularity hit, forcing you to make a series of important domestic decisions. One is how to handle the fact that, as Lord, you cannot enter the House of Commons nor – unless the law is changed – renounce your peerage to do so. Another is whether Churchill, Duff Cooper and the other “hawks” ought to be persuaded to return to Cabinet, having resigned in protest over Istanbul. And finally, whether anything can be done about Sir Oswald Mosley, whose rising popularity – and recent judicial martyrdom by Chamberlain - is threatening the Conservative Party to some degree.

Undoubtedly the biggest challenge ahead is Britain’s dwindling position in the Middle East – and even Asia itself – after the Treaty of Istanbul and the oil crisis. Protests grow in the Dominion of India as they demand the promised elections to be scheduled as soon as possible. The Mandate of Palestine is in flames as Jewish colonists battle Arab militias. Atatürk has forced Britain’s hand into a Treaty that Parliament refuses to ratify, all while Egypt is on the verge of entering the Eurasian Alliance and Saudi Arabia stands alone as a British partner. And, as if to make matters more complex, the combination of saving the Czech economy, ramping rearmament and funding more social programs all conspire to put a strain on finances. Difficult choices lay ahead, but it could be said some underestimate the resilience of Britain. What will you do?

Perhaps one of the biggest winners of Chamberlain’s forced resignation was His Majesty himself, Edward VIII. In unprecedented scenes of constitutional breakdown, something of a briefing war emerged between 10 Downing Street and Buckingham Palace, and though the King has been wounded by supposed pro-German views and middle-class backlash, he remains overwhelmingly popular across the nation. More to the point, he shows no signs of backing down on his intent to marry Ms. Wallis Warfield – formerly Simpson – or silencing his expression of views, having grown emboldened after two years holding the Crown. This, in turn, is as bitterly resisted as ever by the same establishment that has propelled you into office. What should be done?

Republic of France:


Prime Minister,

It is perhaps one of the great ironies of life that your biggest personal achievement, the Nobel Peace Prize, comes right at what many observers are calling the most difficult year of the government, one you’ve miraculously managed to keep together for six years. The most urgent domestic challenge is posed by the so-called “Protectionist Revolt”, leading to mass strikes by workers in Lyon, Paris and Marseille, and protests by farmers across most provincial capitals. Rallying against the Customs and Currency Union and the EMF bailout of Czechoslovakia, tentative demands include turning away from free trade, ending EMF participation, and other measures bitterly resisted by your party. To make matters more complicated, the SFIO has been rocked by worker upheaval, adding enormous pressure on Blum to abandon the government, and the independents on whom the parliamentary majority rest are slowly forced to side with the farmers. How should this crisis be handled?

Against all expectations, the much dreaded Austro-German union has taken place, substantially empowering the Reich while, at least nominally, worsening the French strategic situation. On the bright side, Italo-German relations might be gone forever, and the lack of war has seemingly brought a sigh of open relief for many rather than the nationalistic fervor some feared. It is in this context that the issue of the Saar becomes ever more pressing, with locals increasingly resorting to violent and disruptive methods against the occupying French corps. This, in turn, has caused intense debates on how to solve the issue for good, ranging from those willing to accept the high costs of permanent occupation, to those desiring a diplomatic exit, to those advocating outright annexation despite the risk of breaching the Treaty of Versailles. How should Germany and the Saar be dealt with?

The success of the Viénot Accords – despite their denunciation by the right – has secured the peaceful transfer of power in Syria, preserving some French influence for a few more years. Recent colonial measures have also found success in West Africa. However, it appears that French Indochina – increasingly vital to the economy due to its resources and growing infrastructure – is the next colonial headache to take form. Although the colonial administration of the protectorates is solidly French, with a pliable puppet Emperor causing no issues, the local Communist parties have violently proliferated under a nationalist banner, causing almost daily upheaval in Saigon and Hanoi alongside the local trade unions after, reportedly, sensing a weakness in French colonial rule. How will you deal with Indochina?

United States of America


Mr. President,

After a moderately successful – if relatively uneventful – first year in office, Washington D.C. is starting to gear up for Midterm Elections in November, an uphill climb for a Republican Party which entered office already on the minority in both the House and the Senate. On the bright side of the matter, the Democratic Party is still hopelessly divided between progressives and conservatives, the latter of which have proved willing to compromise with the administration. On the darker side, isolationists are disappointed by your refusal to go as far as they wish in fighting what they consider to be “war profiteering”, and the press is increasingly critical of what they see as a “lack of vision” coming from the White House. As November fast approaches, what will be the rallying cry of the Republican Party and the Borah Administration?

Contrasting with FDR not being able to appoint any Justices to the Supreme Court, developments over the past twelve months have led to three vacancies: Justices Sutherland and Van Devanter (Conservatives), who have chosen to retire, and Justice Cardozo (Liberal), who has passed away. Strictly speaking, this offers you the unique opportunity of reshaping the Supreme Court at a time in which it is emasculating the remnants of the New Deal, provided you can find a way through the Democrat-controlled Senate. Will you be seeking to appoint moderate justices, to preserve balance and ease confirmations? Conservative justices, to appeal to Southern Democrats and wield a sledgehammer against the New Deal? Or liberal justices, taking the Republican Party into an firmly progressive footing?

Trouble is brewing south of the border, and the Administration is likely to be faced with its first real foreign crisis. Over the past few years, the Petroleum Workers Union of Mexico has been locked in a vicious fight with the foreign oil companies – most of them American and/or British – that control oil production in Mexico over working conditions. President Cárdenas, a known left-wing nationalist thought to be inspired by recent events in Iran and Iraq, is now raising the specter of nationalization of the Mexican oil industry, an act that would significantly undermine and damage Standard Oil and Jersey Standards. Will you be taking action to prevent nationalization? What should US policy towards Mexico be?

Soviet Union


Comrade Chairman,

Following a successful coup d’etat – the second in two years – you sit on the Kremlin as Chairman of the State Defence Committee (GKO), the de-facto government of the Soviet state after the downfall of Stalin and Kirov. With the bulk of the Red Army and the NKVD behind you thanks to an awkward alliance with NKVD Chief Yagoda, you must make the difficult decision of how to govern and how to reorganize the state. Will you be repeat Stalin’s example and seek total control? Will you seek to follow Napoleon’s example and use personal rule to take the Revolution elsewhere? Or should you seek to be a primus-inter-pares, and thus avoid the fate of Kirov and Stalin? Equally important will be the decision on what the status of the Red Army will be, with the local garrisons having temporarily replaced the local parties in local governance.

During one of your first Kremlin meetings, Yagoda offers a briefing on the surviving factions and individuals within the Soviet Union, all of them factors to be considered. Kirov, Zhdanov, Beria and Kaganovich are all confirmed dead, with only Stalin reported but not confirmed as killed. The surviving Stalinists (Molotov, Kalinin and Khrushchev) urge you to crush the Left and Right opposition and restore the state of affairs previous to Stalin’s downfall, under new management. The Left (Kamenev and Zinoviev) and Right opposition (Kirov and Bukharin) would have you democratize the party and lead a new “Revolution” (a development Trotsky is looking with interest from his exile). The other Soviet marshals (led by Voroshilov) appear to have misgivings over your personal views. Yagoda would have you purge at least one or two factions to stabilize the USSR, but more enthusiastic officers are already talking of a wide purge. What ought to be done?

Party matters aside, the lack of a stable government over the past two years has severely disrupted the centrally planned economy, resulting in decreased economic output and declining finances. Worse still, open signs of defiance are starting to show. Locally, there are already isolated reports of Red Army units being fired upon by small bands of insurgents in Chechnya, the Ukraine and Eastern Siberia. Abroad, the USSR’s largest satellite nation is showing concerning signs of autonomy, as Mongolian premier Genden has taken the unprecedented step of denouncing the instability in Moscow and Stalin’s previous tendencies. Losing Ulaanbaatar would undoubtedly weaken the Soviet position in the Far East and possibly empower the Japanese, but there’s a question of whether the USSR can afford an expedition to put Genden in his place. What will you do?

Kingdom of Italy


Duce,

The mood at the most recent Cabinet in the Palazzo Venezia is of a decidedly mixed nature. On one side of the table, Marshal Balbo laments the Vienna debacle, and makes the case for Herr Hugenberg to be turned into an international pariah whilst an Austrian government in exile is formed. On another, Count Ciano believes the recent Balkan triumphs outweigh the Anschluss, as Italy, for all purposes, is the undisputed master of the Adriatic and remains at liberty to pursue other foreign adventures as the Anti-Bolshevik pact grows. The debate, ultimately, is by no means settled. Minister Jung, for his part, expresses serious concerns over the Romanian economic debacle, particularly given its key role as an oil exporter to the continent, and dares to advocate that Italy take the lead in salvaging Bucharest’s beleaguered economy. How should Italy pursue its foreign affairs in 1938?

Control of the Adriatic may be a firm reality, but recent developments in Croatia and Albania ensure that the Balkan question is not as settled as Rome might like. The removal of Macek and the installation of Ante Pavelic as supreme master in Croatia has sparked an uprising, with the HSS remnants fighting across the countryside as casualties continue to mount. And although King Zog might be sitting helplessly somewhere as even the League of Nations abandons him, some of his followers continue to resist in the mountains, inspired by a sparingly effective initial response to the Italian invasion. Therefore, the question arises on whether puppet regimes ought to handle the dirty work of dealing with insurgencies, or whether the Italian military should take direct control. Furthermore, the question of how Albania is to be governed also remains open.

Although a recent overture to Argentina has failed after the victory of the liberal-minded opposition, Italy has seemingly found a more receptive environment in Brazil. From Rio de Janeiro, the populist and nationalist President Getulio Vargas has just successfully launched a self-coup, announcing the start of a so-called “New State” (Estado Novo) and closing down Brazil’s democratic institutions. Even if Vargas himself rejects the label, many have noted the similarities of his program with Italian fascism and corporatism, and the President has reached out to Count Ciano for a potential partnership. However, this is complicated by the Brazilian Integralist Action, the local fascist party – that commands support from the Italo-Brazilian population -, whose leader, Plinio Salgado, denounces that Vargas has banned his party and cracked down on what Salgado calls “true Brazilian fascism”. How should the Brazilian overture be dealt with?
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« Reply #378 on: March 05, 2023, 06:10:23 PM »
« Edited: March 16, 2023, 09:41:28 PM by Lumine »

Empire of Japan


Your Majesty,

The Empire is at war. Despite significant attrition and casualties, the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy have largely prevailed during the first stage of the war, expelling the Chinese from Shanghai, opening up the route to Nanjing and Beijing, and occupying almost the entire enemy coastline, leaving only the blockaded Guangzhou, Fuzhou and Qingdao open for Chiang. On the other hand, Marshal Zhang’s ingenuity has achieved significant progress for the Northern Coalition, seizing Inner Mongolia and essentially threatening the core of Manchuria with invasion. There is no agreement to speak of between the IJA and IJN on how the war should be prosecuted, or even what the end goal truly is, and important decisions must be made on how the vast occupied territories will be administered. How should the war be fought in 1938, Your Majesty? And should the Empire take advantage of the Mongolian situation as well?

Perhaps due to the war, Prince Higashikuni has been able to enlarge his government into a national unity formation, though the question of whether the Minseito and Seiyukai ought to have more cabinet portfolios is one that is poisoning the environment somewhat. Even the Kokumin Domei has moderated its rhetoric against the government, directing it instead in support of the war effort in China and calling for harsh action to subjugate the Chinese people for good. The Shakai Taishuto has been the only party to offer some criticism, and even this has come at an internal cost. Oddly enough, it is education that has become an early issue for Higashikuni’s government, with the Seiyukai leading the charge to reform education policy to foment nationalism and racial superiority, while purging teaches who disagree with the war and with those policies. How should Higashikuni conduct domestic affairs this year?

Republic of China


Generalissimo,

China is now at war. Although some warlords are yet to fully support the war effort – including Yunnan and the Ma Clique -, effectively collaboration has been established with the Northern and Southern coalitions, doing much to bolster resistance efforts against the admittedly powerful Japanese military. Thus far, Marshal Zhang holds a knife at the throat of the Japanese in Manchuria and Shanghai has only been ceded to the enemy after prolonged resistance, but much of the coastline has been lost and the Japanese blockade is preventing the arrival of foreign weaponry and supplies. There are those, like Wang Jingwei, who urge a compromise to avoid bloodshed. Most are prepared to fight to the bitter end, but warn the struggle may yet turn grim. How will China conduct this struggle against Japan, and what will be Nanjing’s end goal?

Despite a newfound sense of national unity, there are many domestic issues demanding attention. Chief among them is the issue of the capital city of Nanjing, which is now left vulnerable after the fall of Shanghai. There is simply no consensus on whether the city should be abandoned for a safer, remote location, or whether the government should remain to avoid panic. There is also disagreement on how hard Nanjing should be defended, with the experience of Shanghai warning of the dangers of prolonged attrition. Some officers are also advocating suspending the planned local and municipal elections, judging them to be a distraction. And, as always, there is the issue of the National Revolutionary Army, which will have to be both funded and supplied instead of the blockade. Can you find a way to solve these conundrums and marshal China’s resources successfully?

Polish Republic


Mr. President,

Although for the most part averted from going out of control due to the timely arrival of the highly expensive agricultural plan, there are newfound signs of dissent for Sanation. The farmers may be placated for now – yet still upset about a steady embrace of free trade -, but industrial dissent and opposition to the Czech bailout remains high, resulting in a series of strikes across Warsaw and Krakow and some organized marches by opposition leaders that have sparked some concern within the government. As always, there is disagreement between those who would try to address the crisis through increased social spending, to those who favor repression and cite the need to use those resources elsewhere. More complicated still, events in Romania have led many to question whether Warsaw ought to step in and save the Romanian economy as well.

Ever since the annexation of the Vilnius region, the government of Lithuania has steadfastly refused to have normal diplomatic relations with Poland, clinging to the belief the territory remains to them. This posture has only solidified under the continued rule of President Antanas Smetona, whose stubbornness has increasingly infuriated the “hawks” within Sanation. Only a few days ago, an incident between Lithuanian and Polish border guards left one dead in each side, an act which Minister of State Rydz-Smigly was quick to denounce as an international Lithuanian provocation. As crowds begin to gather in Warsaw to protest against what they see as a hostile regime in Lithuania, demands within Sanation and the military – led by Rydz-Smigly – grow for action against Smetona, even in favor of a military response if needed. With the Soviets busy elsewhere and the eye of the world placed upon the Germans, should action be taken to respond to Lithuanian aggression?

Republic of Turkey


Mr. President,

Your remarkable popularity has hit heights never seen before, as crowds dance and sheer in Istanbul, Ankara and all the major cities following the announcement of the Treaty of Istanbul. Already there is talk on Mexico of mimicking the oil nationalization that the Eurasian Alliance has seemingly attained with very limited bloodshed. However, looks may yet be deceptive. The Saudis stubbornly cling to Britain. Faisal of Iraq is as opinionated as ever. Venizelos despairs in forced exile in Istanbul. And though young King Farouk is about to bring Egypt into the Eurasian umbrella, the arrival of a new “grey men” to 10 Downing Street could yet signal renewed resistance from the British Empire. How should diplomacy with the new Prime Minister be handled, and, will you manage to retain the gains that not long ago seemed so impossible?

Albeit masked by the oil crisis triumph and the marked increase in your personal standing, some recent decisions have sparked criticism against the government, even from newspapers and congressmen usually reliable. For one, the successful resettling of thousands of Bosnian refugees has been met with distrust at best, even after public campaigns to promote the scheme. Though integrating themselves reasonably well and looking at you as a savior, it is clear the move has not brought out a sense of kinship in the Turkish population. More worryingly, the entry into several free trade arrangements has angered the trade unions, farmers and other groups who embrace protectionism, resulting in thus far non-violent protests and demands for a return to earlier standards. There are those who advise turning back the clock could well avert needless controversy before elections are held in 1939, just as others warn the Turkish economy desperately needs more trade. What should be done?

Kingdom of Romania


Your Majesty,

These are grim times for Romania, and the situation in Bucharest is described by some as downright bleak. Panicking over the oil crisis, the Bucharest Stock Exchange crashed into a violent meltdown reminiscent of New York (1929) and Prague (1936), sinking the already weakened Romanian economy. The political effects notwithstanding, unemployment has climbed into disastrous levels as millions of restless citizens are left unemployed and in danger of becoming destitute. This, in turn, necessitates an urgent response, the nature of which your advisors cannot agree upon. There are those who favor austerity, bringing down spending as much as possible in order to balance the budget. Others favor mimicking Poland and the United States through deficit spending, pointing out to the oil industries as potential collateral for foreign loans. And others still would go to the EMF and beg the four powers for a Czech-style rescue, even at the risk of having policies imposed on Romania. What should be done?

Almost as pressing as the economic crisis is the political situation, the crash coinciding with a General Election that has left the monarchy greatly weakened. The PNL was violently hurled out of office, with your rivals Maniu (centrist, PNT) and Codrenau (far-right, Iron Guard) securing enough seats between themselves to ensure a hostile parliament. This, in turn, creates an interesting dilemma. Parliament is likely to insist on Maniu as premier, a move that would placate the traditional politicians while further weakening your powers and influence. Naturally, this is bitterly resisted by the collection of royal courtiers and friends that has bolstered you during the past decade, with some of them even encouraging you to take action to prevent a hostile government from taking over Romania and, so they claim, “sell it to the highest bidder”. What will you do?

Union of South Africa


Prime Minister,

Yet another attempt to get the LON to accept South African control of South West Africa has failed, but it has come to be expected by many. Having slowly built much political capital and eviscerated the opposition, you stand at a solid position, only undermined by the apparent lack of direction by the government. This is perhaps best represented by foreign policy, an area in which two souls appear to collide: one, close to the expansionist views of a greater South Africa you’ve held for years, advocating for South Africa to simply annex the mandate, encroach into the Portuguese colonial possessions, and/or even redouble the case to merge Southern Rhodesia with the Union. Another, hopeful about South Africa’s international role, calling for the Union to take the lead in strengthening the League of Nations, battle for a Jewish Homeland (a goal previously supported by you), and/or adopt other causes to earn prestige and respect for the nation. What will you do?

Commonwealth of Australia


Prime Minister,

Jack Lang, the “Big Fella”, has been vanquished at the polls by the United Australia Party after three controversial years in office, allowing you to make an unexpected return as PM with a majority dependent on a single independent MP. Known for your strong views and abrasive behavior, many wonder if you can square said views with such a narrow majority. Priorities will include deciding whether to scrap Lang’s controversial National Health Service pilot, whether to push your known support for rearmament despite its unpopularity, where to stand on King Edward VIII’s marriage plans and the Sino-Japanese war, and, perhaps more worryingly, on the ongoing secession movement in Western Australia, empowered after the anti-secession Labor experienced such erosion during Lang’s time in office. How will you conduct yourself in the first year of your return?

Kingdom of Hungary


It has been a long road, but at long last, you have recovered the Crown of St. Stephen. A Hapsburg sits on the throne of Hungary once again, and the indignity forced on your father – twice – has been somewhat mitigated. The other crowns of your family, however, appear to be far, far away, particularly after the Anschluss. For all purposes, the worst appears to have passed, with Budapest slowly being rebuilt, elections successfully held, and the German economic lifeline keeping the country running while its finances are slowly rebuilt. Thus, new decisions are to be made. One of them is whether to appoint former Regent Horthy as Prime Minister, and if not, who should have the post. Another is how to grow the Hungarian economy to recover from the war. And yet another, sparked by the economic meltdown of Romania and Czechoslovakia, as well as the end of Yugoslavia, is whether the border demilitarization forced by the Treaty of Paris should be respected. What will the King do in his first year in office?

Kingdom of Bulgaria


Your Majesty,

Against all expectations, the unlikely ceasefire between Sofia and Belgrade has held over a period of months, creating a tense sort of peace in the war-torn region whilst local inhabitants – and more importantly, Mihailov and the IMRO – wonder when hostilities will resume. Despite recent difficulties encountered as farmers and workers protest free trade agreements in the streets of Sofia, the military has been pressuring to resume hostilities before Greater Serbia – now triumphant against the Bosniaks – fully stabilizes and overwhelms Bulgarian defenses in Macedonia. Prime Minister Mushanov, on the other hand, would rather rely on international arbitration, suggesting Bulgaria may have earned foreign goodwill after assisting in the rescue of the Bosniak refugees. The decision, ultimately, lies with the Crown, and with it the potential fate of the nation. What will you do?

Abyssinian Empire


Your Majesty,

After seven years of reign as an absolute monarch, increased border tensions have led to a state of permanent uncertainty within Addis Ababa. Over the past two years there have been multiple border skirmishes between Italian and Abyssinian troops across the border with Italian Eritrea, resulting in several casualties and, most recently, what appears to be a troop build-up ordered by Rome. With a lack of reliable foreign partners, and with the nation’s defense undercut by a continued arms embargo – since 1906 – by Italy, France and the United Kingdom, many wonder whether the prospect of war with Rome is likely, and whether the Empire has the means to inflict another devastating defeat in the mold of the Battle of Adwa forty years ago. How will you handle this border conflict?


Dominion of Canada


Prime Minister,

A third electoral victory has restored the Conservative majority and greatly enhanced your status as a consecuential Premier, although it has also caused something of a paradox. One of the most effective criticisms by the Liberal Party on the campaign trail was the perception that the Conservatives would be more likely to involve Canada in a future struggle, which now appears more likely than ever as tensions in Europe boil and explode. Just as important, those same tensions and uncertainty have done much to undermine economic stability, preventing further gains and keeping the Canadian economy somewhat stagnated - if finally out of Depression -. On the other hand, Canada has made a point of closing ranks with the Commonwealth, and after seven years in office, your voice undoubtedly carries some weight on the world stage. How will you navigate these troublesome waters? (OOC: Consider it written for the status of January 1938).
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« Reply #379 on: March 07, 2023, 02:07:24 PM »

Quote
Statement from the Foreign Ministry

The signing of this treaty today is a momentous occasion of cooperation between the Japanese and Russian people. While our criticisms of international Bolshevism remain firm, we recognize that peace, rather than conflict, is the way forward between our two nations. The Empire of Japan affirms its commitment to respect existing international agreements and territorial sovereignty with respect to the Soviet Union. It is in that spirit that we have concluded this non-aggression pact today.

Quote
Soviet-Japanese Non-Aggression Pact

Comrade Chairman Mikhail Tukhachevsky of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, guided by a desire to strengthen peaceful and friendly relations between the two countries, have decided to conclude a pact on neutrality, for which purpose they have appointed as their Representatives:

ARTICLE 1: Both Contracting Parties undertake to maintain peaceful and friendly relations between them and mutually respect the territorial integrity and inviolability of the other Contracting Party.

ARTICLE 2: Should one of the Contracting Parties become the object of hostilities on the part of one or several third powers, the other Contracting Party will observe neutrality throughout the duration of the conflict.

ARTICLE 3: The present Pact comes into force from the day of its ratification by both Contracting Parties and remains valid for five years. In case neither of the Contracting Parties denounces the Pact one year before the expiration of the term, it will be considered automatically prolonged for the next five years.

ARTICLE 4: The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics shall recognize the State of Manchukuo as a legal and sovereign state under international law.

ARTICLE 5: The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the Empire of Japan affirm all existing territorial boundaries as they stand today. This article may be renegotiated with the mutual consent of both Contracting Parties.

ARTICLE 6: The present Pact is subject to ratification as soon as possible. The instruments of ratification shall be exchanged in Tokyo and Moscow, also as soon as possible.

In confirmation whereof the above-named Representatives have signed the present Pact in two copies, drawn up in the Russian and Japanese languages, and affixed thereto their seals.

X Shigenori Togo, Japanese Ambassador to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
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« Reply #380 on: March 07, 2023, 02:23:04 PM »
« Edited: March 07, 2023, 02:27:32 PM by Senator Laki »

Quote
Statement from the USSR

Fellow comrades,

The signing of this treaty today is an example of how anti-colonialist and anti-imperialist forces is what unites the Japanese and Russian people and to a larger extent all people over the world. Western and Central European powers have been disrespectful and decadent on us for so long, thinking they were the center of the world, while they were not. So many atrocities were committed in Africa, in Asia and in the New World. Nations and powers outside Europe were treated with disrespect. All people over the world have been treated in a atrocious way. Those times need to be over. We remain committed to bringing change over the world, we remain committed to ending colonialism, we remain committed to ending imperialism, we remain committed to ending capitalism, greed and oppression, we remain committed to liberate all people from these dangerous outside influences and unite them under one banner, that of cooperation, unity and amicability. This is one step to a new Eurasian partnership. Join us and be part of the revolution.

Quote
Soviet-Japanese Non-Aggression Pact

Comrade Chairman Mikhail Tukhachevsky of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, guided by a desire to strengthen peaceful and friendly relations between the two countries, have decided to conclude a pact on neutrality, for which purpose they have appointed as their Representatives:

ARTICLE 1: Both Contracting Parties undertake to maintain peaceful and friendly relations between them and mutually respect the territorial integrity and inviolability of the other Contracting Party.

ARTICLE 2: Should one of the Contracting Parties become the object of hostilities on the part of one or several third powers, the other Contracting Party will observe neutrality throughout the duration of the conflict.

ARTICLE 3: The present Pact comes into force from the day of its ratification by both Contracting Parties and remains valid for five years. In case neither of the Contracting Parties denounces the Pact one year before the expiration of the term, it will be considered automatically prolonged for the next five years.

ARTICLE 4: The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics shall recognize the State of Manchukuo as a legal and sovereign state under international law.

ARTICLE 5: The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the Empire of Japan affirm all existing territorial boundaries as they stand today. This article may be renegotiated with the mutual consent of both Contracting Parties.

ARTICLE 6: The present Pact is subject to ratification as soon as possible. The instruments of ratification shall be exchanged in Tokyo and Moscow, also as soon as possible.

In confirmation whereof the above-named Representatives have signed the present Pact in two copies, drawn up in the Russian and Japanese languages, and affixed thereto their seals.

X Mikhail Tukhachevsky, Chairman of the State Defence Committee to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
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« Reply #381 on: March 07, 2023, 02:50:08 PM »

Quote
GUARANTEE OF INDEPENDENCE AND PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

Between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and the Abyssinian Empire

Preamble:

The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of maintaining mutual respect, cooperation, and friendship between their nations. They further recognize the significance of promoting and safeguarding the principles of independence, sovereignty, territorial integrity, and non-interference in each other's internal affairs. With this understanding, they hereby agree as follows:

Article I: Sovereignty and Independence

1. The USSR recognizes the sovereignty and independence of the Abyssinian Empire as a fully autonomous state with the right to make its political, economic, social, and cultural decisions without any external interference.

2. The Abyssinian Empire recognizes the sovereignty and independence of the USSR as a socialist state with the right to make its political, economic, social, and cultural decisions without any external interference.

3. Both parties agree to refrain from any action that may infringe upon each other's sovereignty, territorial integrity, or political independence.

Article II: Economic Cooperation

1. Both parties agree to promote economic cooperation and trade between them for mutual benefit.

2. The USSR shall provide technical assistance, as well as machinery and equipment, to support the Abyssinian Empire's economic development.

3. The Abyssinian Empire shall ensure the protection of Soviet investments in its territory.

Article III: Military Cooperation

1. The USSR recognizes the right of the Abyssinian Empire to maintain a defensive military force for the protection of its territorial integrity.

2. The Abyssinian Empire recognizes the right of the USSR to maintain a defensive military force for the protection of its territorial integrity.

3. Both parties agree to cooperate in the exchange of military knowledge, training, and equipment for the purpose of ensuring their mutual defense.

Article IV: Cultural Cooperation

1. Both parties agree to promote cultural exchanges, scientific cooperation, and educational exchanges for mutual benefit.

2. The USSR shall provide assistance in the training of Abyssinian students and scholars in its universities, while the Abyssinian Empire shall offer opportunities for Soviet scholars and students to study and conduct research in its institutions.

3. Both parties shall encourage the development of people-to-people contacts and cultural exchanges to foster mutual understanding and friendship.

Article V: Settlement of Disputes

1. Any disputes or disagreements that may arise between the USSR and the Abyssinian Empire shall be resolved through peaceful means and consultations between the parties.

2. If consultations fail to resolve the dispute, the parties agree to submit the matter to arbitration by a neutral third party or an international organization.

3. Both parties agree to abide by the decision of the arbitrator or the international organization.

Article VI: Duration and Termination

1. This agreement shall enter into force upon signature by the parties and shall remain in force for a period of ten years.

2. If either party wishes to terminate this agreement, it shall provide written notice of its intention to do so six months prior to the expiration of the ten-year period.

3. If neither party provides such notice, this agreement shall be automatically renewed for successive ten-year periods unless terminated by either party.

Article VII: Mutual Defense

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize that their mutual security is inextricably linked.

2. In the event of an attack on the Abyssinian Empire by a foreign power or powers, the USSR shall provide military and logistical assistance to help defend the Abyssinian Empire.

3. The form and extent of the assistance provided by the USSR shall be determined through consultation between the parties.

4. This article shall not be construed as an obligation on the part of the USSR to provide military assistance if the attack on the Abyssinian Empire is a result of aggression or provocation on the part of the Abyssinian Empire.

Article VIII: Economic Development

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of promoting economic development for the benefit of their peoples.

2. The USSR shall provide technical assistance and investment to support the Abyssinian Empire's economic development plans.

3. The Abyssinian Empire shall provide favorable conditions for Soviet enterprises operating in its territory.

4. Both parties shall promote joint ventures and cooperation in the fields of agriculture, industry, transportation, and energy.

5. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire shall cooperate in the exploration and exploitation of their natural resources, including oil, gas, minerals, and timber.

6. The parties shall encourage the development of economic and trade relations between their regions and localities.

7. Both parties shall exchange information and experience in economic planning and management.

Article IX: Intelligence Cooperation

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of exchanging intelligence information in order to enhance their national security.

2. The intelligence services of the USSR and the Abyssinian Empire shall cooperate in the exchange of information and analysis related to matters of mutual interest, including terrorism, organized crime, and other threats to national security.

3. The exchange of intelligence information shall be conducted in accordance with the laws and regulations of each party.

4. The parties shall designate liaison officers to facilitate the exchange of intelligence information and to promote cooperation between their intelligence services.

5. The parties shall ensure the protection of classified information exchanged between them, and shall take appropriate measures to prevent its unauthorized disclosure or use.

6. The parties shall cooperate in the training and professional development of their intelligence personnel.

7. The parties shall share best practices and techniques related to intelligence gathering, analysis, and operations.

8. The parties shall regularly review the effectiveness of their intelligence cooperation and make adjustments as necessary.

Article X: Arms Trade

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of maintaining a strong defense capability to ensure their national security.

2. The parties agree to facilitate the trade of arms and military equipment between them, subject to the laws and regulations of each party.

3. The parties shall establish a joint commission to oversee the trade of arms and military equipment, and to ensure that such trade is consistent with their respective national security interests.

4. The parties shall ensure that the trade of arms and military equipment does not contribute to regional instability, and shall take appropriate measures to prevent their diversion to unauthorized users.

5. The parties shall provide each other with information on their respective defense requirements, and shall consider opportunities for joint production and development of defense equipment.

6. The parties shall cooperate in the training and professional development of their military personnel.

7. The parties shall regularly review the effectiveness of their arms trade cooperation and make adjustments as necessary.

In witness whereof, the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Guarantee of Independence and Partnership Agreement in duplicate in the Russian and Amharic languages, both texts being equally authentic.

X Mikhail Tukhachevsky, Chairman of the State Defence Committee to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
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« Reply #382 on: March 07, 2023, 02:52:58 PM »


Quote
GUARANTEE OF INDEPENDENCE AND PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

Between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and the Abyssinian Empire

Preamble:

The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of maintaining mutual respect, cooperation, and friendship between their nations. They further recognize the significance of promoting and safeguarding the principles of independence, sovereignty, territorial integrity, and non-interference in each other's internal affairs. With this understanding, they hereby agree as follows:

Article I: Sovereignty and Independence

1. The USSR recognizes the sovereignty and independence of the Abyssinian Empire as a fully autonomous state with the right to make its political, economic, social, and cultural decisions without any external interference.

2. The Abyssinian Empire recognizes the sovereignty and independence of the USSR as a socialist state with the right to make its political, economic, social, and cultural decisions without any external interference.

3. Both parties agree to refrain from any action that may infringe upon each other's sovereignty, territorial integrity, or political independence.

Article II: Economic Cooperation

1. Both parties agree to promote economic cooperation and trade between them for mutual benefit.

2. The USSR shall provide technical assistance, as well as machinery and equipment, to support the Abyssinian Empire's economic development.

3. The Abyssinian Empire shall ensure the protection of Soviet investments in its territory.

Article III: Military Cooperation

1. The USSR recognizes the right of the Abyssinian Empire to maintain a defensive military force for the protection of its territorial integrity.

2. The Abyssinian Empire recognizes the right of the USSR to maintain a defensive military force for the protection of its territorial integrity.

3. Both parties agree to cooperate in the exchange of military knowledge, training, and equipment for the purpose of ensuring their mutual defense.

Article IV: Cultural Cooperation

1. Both parties agree to promote cultural exchanges, scientific cooperation, and educational exchanges for mutual benefit.

2. The USSR shall provide assistance in the training of Abyssinian students and scholars in its universities, while the Abyssinian Empire shall offer opportunities for Soviet scholars and students to study and conduct research in its institutions.

3. Both parties shall encourage the development of people-to-people contacts and cultural exchanges to foster mutual understanding and friendship.

Article V: Settlement of Disputes

1. Any disputes or disagreements that may arise between the USSR and the Abyssinian Empire shall be resolved through peaceful means and consultations between the parties.

2. If consultations fail to resolve the dispute, the parties agree to submit the matter to arbitration by a neutral third party or an international organization.

3. Both parties agree to abide by the decision of the arbitrator or the international organization.

Article VI: Duration and Termination

1. This agreement shall enter into force upon signature by the parties and shall remain in force for a period of ten years.

2. If either party wishes to terminate this agreement, it shall provide written notice of its intention to do so six months prior to the expiration of the ten-year period.

3. If neither party provides such notice, this agreement shall be automatically renewed for successive ten-year periods unless terminated by either party.

Article VII: Mutual Defense

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize that their mutual security is inextricably linked.

2. In the event of an attack on the Abyssinian Empire by a foreign power or powers, the USSR shall provide military and logistical assistance to help defend the Abyssinian Empire.

3. The form and extent of the assistance provided by the USSR shall be determined through consultation between the parties.

4. This article shall not be construed as an obligation on the part of the USSR to provide military assistance if the attack on the Abyssinian Empire is a result of aggression or provocation on the part of the Abyssinian Empire.

Article VIII: Economic Development

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of promoting economic development for the benefit of their peoples.

2. The USSR shall provide technical assistance and investment to support the Abyssinian Empire's economic development plans.

3. The Abyssinian Empire shall provide favorable conditions for Soviet enterprises operating in its territory.

4. Both parties shall promote joint ventures and cooperation in the fields of agriculture, industry, transportation, and energy.

5. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire shall cooperate in the exploration and exploitation of their natural resources, including oil, gas, minerals, and timber.

6. The parties shall encourage the development of economic and trade relations between their regions and localities.

7. Both parties shall exchange information and experience in economic planning and management.

Article IX: Intelligence Cooperation

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of exchanging intelligence information in order to enhance their national security.

2. The intelligence services of the USSR and the Abyssinian Empire shall cooperate in the exchange of information and analysis related to matters of mutual interest, including terrorism, organized crime, and other threats to national security.

3. The exchange of intelligence information shall be conducted in accordance with the laws and regulations of each party.

4. The parties shall designate liaison officers to facilitate the exchange of intelligence information and to promote cooperation between their intelligence services.

5. The parties shall ensure the protection of classified information exchanged between them, and shall take appropriate measures to prevent its unauthorized disclosure or use.

6. The parties shall cooperate in the training and professional development of their intelligence personnel.

7. The parties shall share best practices and techniques related to intelligence gathering, analysis, and operations.

8. The parties shall regularly review the effectiveness of their intelligence cooperation and make adjustments as necessary.

Article X: Arms Trade

1. The USSR and the Abyssinian Empire recognize the importance of maintaining a strong defense capability to ensure their national security.

2. The parties agree to facilitate the trade of arms and military equipment between them, subject to the laws and regulations of each party.

3. The parties shall establish a joint commission to oversee the trade of arms and military equipment, and to ensure that such trade is consistent with their respective national security interests.

4. The parties shall ensure that the trade of arms and military equipment does not contribute to regional instability, and shall take appropriate measures to prevent their diversion to unauthorized users.

5. The parties shall provide each other with information on their respective defense requirements, and shall consider opportunities for joint production and development of defense equipment.

6. The parties shall cooperate in the training and professional development of their military personnel.

7. The parties shall regularly review the effectiveness of their arms trade cooperation and make adjustments as necessary.

In witness whereof, the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Guarantee of Independence and Partnership Agreement in duplicate in the Russian and Abyssinian languages, both texts being equally authentic.


X Halie Selassie I, Emperor of Abyssinia
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« Reply #383 on: March 07, 2023, 03:06:01 PM »

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The USSR welcomes Jewish Refugees

The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR, recognizing the plight of Jewish people around the world who are facing discrimination, persecution, and violence, declares that the USSR will be a welcome refuge for Jewish refugees.

The USSR has a long history of standing up against anti-Semitism and promoting the rights of minorities. We believe that every human being has the right to live free from fear and oppression, and that it is our responsibility to help those who are suffering.

We call on all nations to join us in this effort, to recognize the rights of Jewish people, and to provide them with a safe haven.

The USSR will open its borders to Jewish refugees, and we will provide them with assistance in resettlement, housing, and employment. We will work with international organizations to provide aid to those who need it, and we will ensure that Jewish refugees are treated with the dignity and respect they deserve.

We call on all nations to do their part in supporting Jewish refugees, to condemn anti-Semitism and all forms of discrimination, and to work towards a world where all people are treated equally and with respect.

We urge the international community to take action to protect the rights of Jewish people, and to work towards a future where they can live free from fear and persecution.

X Mikhail Tukhachevsky, Chairman of the State Defence Committee to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
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« Reply #384 on: March 07, 2023, 03:14:29 PM »


EVENT

Czech government collapses
Deadlock on presidential election brings a VONC,
Petka minority government brought down by combined opposition,
Czechoslovakia heads to the polls amidst fear, anger and uncertainty

FOR: EUROPEAN PLAYERS

Having miraculously lasted for over two years in spite of a hopelessly deadlocked parliament, the joint government of Acting President Jan Malpetyr, recently appointed Prime Minister Milan Hodza, and the moderate "Petka" parties has come into an end. Already crippled by the Prague Crash, the government made a narrow survival thanks to the last minute assistance of the founding members of the EMF, getting their rescue package through Parliament by the narrowest of margins thanks to unexpected support by National Fascist League. Buoyed by this success and early signs of the stabilization of the economy, Acting President Malpetyr tried to break the deadlock by having Parliament elect a successor to the deceased Tomas Masaryk. It was not to be. Vote after vote successive Petka candidates were vetoed by the ethnic parties, the Fascists and the Communists, and then further action was taken.

General Radola Gajda (National Fascist League) and Klement Gottwald (Communist Party) joined forces to force a Vote of No Confidence, which passed thanks to the vote of the ethnic parties. The collapse of the government and the lack of any viable alternative has left Malpetyr with no choice but to call a general election, one in which the five Petka parties are broadly expected to take on an even larger beating. In the meantime, the ethnic parties are in a state of high mobilization, with calls for domestic autonomy and even independence for Czech Germans, Hungarians, Ukrainians and the Slovaks having grown exponentially as a result of the war and the stock market crisis. In the meantime, Gottwald and Gajda are aggressive touring the nation and appealing to the vast masses of unemployed citizens, with both parties expected to have a growth similar to that of pre-Hugenberg Germany.

Following the General Election, the new parliament will have to elect a President by majority vote. The prospect of a Fascist or Communist government in Prague, in the meantime, has led to increasing alarm from the Czech establishment and parts of the military, with talk of a potential military coup ever more prominent in the newspapers. For all purposes, and until the election is held in a few more weeks, Czechoslovakia stands at the brink.
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Lumine
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« Reply #385 on: March 07, 2023, 03:50:15 PM »


CRISIS

Comintern marches on the Far-East!
Following historic signature of Russo-Japanese non-aggression pact,
Red Army invades Xinjiang region, Mongolia attacks Northern Coalition,
Chinese public outraged, demands grow on Chiang to declare war on Moscow

FOR: USSR, CHINA, JAPAN

It was back in 1933 that, desperate from support to resist a Kuomintang invasion, local Xinjiang warlord Sheng Shicai urged Moscow to intervene. Stalin, then busy with a series of domestic crises, chose not to, allowing young General Ma Zhongying - a rising KMT star - to seize the region, kill the warlord and replace him as a sort of unofficial viceroy for Chiang Kai-shek. Technically subservient to Nanjing, Ma had almost five years of unobstructed rule over Xinjiang, time spent in consolidating control, brutally suppressing a series of revolt, significantly expanding his local armies, and exploiting resources to combat the sheer lack of development on the region. Though concerned by the Japanese invasion, Ma had not yet taken active steps to mobilize troops to the east when frantic reports came from his border guards: the Red Army had crossed the frontier.

Having just signed an unexpected non-aggression pact with Japan, Chairman Tukhachevsky put an end to several years of Soviet timidity in foreign affairs, and ordered the immediate invasion and occupation of the vast desert region. 20,000 Red Army soldiers stormed the border positions and promptly defeated local garrisons and a few militia units, starting a rapid penetration towards the regional capital of Urumqi. Aided by superior weaponry and technology, the Soviets destroyed one of Ma's divisions at the battle of Kashgar, forcing the personal intervention of Ma Zhongying and the 36th Division, his cadre of elite troops. After abandoning most of western Xinjiang, Ma made a successful stand at the Battle of Aksu, containing the Soviet advance and preventing a rapid capture of Urumqi.

The Soviets then wasted no time in proclaiming the formation of Xinjiang People's Republic from Kashgar, and it is reported by foreign journalists that an intense pro-Communism propaganda operation is taking place across the region. The first headache for the Soviets, however, has taken place due to the formation of the government, with local Communist General Ishaq Beg Munonov proposing himself to lead it at the same time that a delegation from the remnants of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has petition the local Red Army commander to allow the CCP to establish itself in Xinjiang rather than having a regional government. Ma, for his part, has urgently requested reinforcements and supplies from Nanjing, a prospect that appears unlikely due to the Japanese naval blockade.

However, the more dramatic move was yet to happen. Following the visit of a Soviet delegation to Ulaanbaatar, recent disagreements between Prime Minister Genden and Moscow seemed to come to a swift end. Only days after the Soviet incursion into Xinjiang, 30,000 men from the Mongolian People's Army crossed the border into the areas controlled by the Northern Coalition of warlords, swarming Inner Mongolia and directly threatening Field Marshal Zhang's rear with the bulk of his forced locked deep into Manchuria. Unlike in Xinjiang, the Communist effort proved far less successful due to the dismal state of the Mongolian forces, with only the arrival of volunteers preventing an early defeat at the hands of Zhang's rearguard units. Still, the threat is serious enough to pose the difficult question of a withdrawal from Manchuria, at a time in which the Genden government appears to be pursuing bold Pan-Mongolism.

In Nanjing and other Chinese cities not under occupation, the news of the Soviet and Mongolian invasions has sparked fury, anger and talk of betrayal, a development that has also weakened remaining pro-Communist sympathies in KMT territory. Crowds have started to march demanding a declaration of war on Moscow, posing a major dilemma for Generalissimo Chiang.
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Dereich
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« Reply #386 on: March 07, 2023, 10:24:19 PM »

An Announcement from the Office of the Prime Minister

It is with deepest sorrow that I must reveal to Parliament and Nation the truth of what has taken place over the past several months. My predecessor, The Right Honourable Neville Chamberlain, is a man well-known by all who have met him to be zealous, dedicated, and industrious to a fault. Over the past year, out of pure devotion to his duties and the Empire, he was seen and observed working all hours of the night and every day of the week without a single word of complaint. Sadly, those of us closest to him failed to see that as he nobly worked himself to the bone, the stress and sheer weight of his duties had begun to cloud his judgment. Even as he continued to take on more responsibilities, conducting negotiations entirely alone, it is now clear that for the last several months Mr. Chamberlain was unfortunately not capable of exercising the sound judgment required for his high office. This government will endeavor to ensure all lapses in judgment made by the former prime minister are swiftly and decisively corrected. At this time I withdraw from Parliamentary consideration the so-called "Treaty of Istanbul" and apologize on behalf of His Majesty's Government for submitting to them such a document which was so clearly forced by duress on a deeply suffering man to begin with. Further negotiations to ensure the proper enforcement of British treaties and property rights will begin immediately.
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« Reply #387 on: March 07, 2023, 10:36:02 PM »

Excerpt of Foreign Secretary's Speech to Parliament on the Baltic Situation

...In the event of any action which clearly threatened Latvian independence, and which the Latvian Government accordingly considered it vital to resist with their national forces and expressed such to His Majesty’s Government, His Majesty's Government would feel themselves bound at once to lend the Latvian Government all support in their power. They have given the President of Latvia an assurance to this effect. I may add that the French Government have authorized me to make it plain that they stand in the same position in this matter as do His Majesty's Government.
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YPestis25
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« Reply #388 on: March 07, 2023, 10:36:41 PM »

Excerpt of Foreign Secretary's Speech to Parliament on the Baltic Situation

...In the event of any action which clearly threatened Latvian independence, and which the Latvian Government accordingly considered it vital to resist with their national forces and expressed such to His Majesty’s Government, His Majesty's Government would feel themselves bound at once to lend the Latvian Government all support in their power. They have given the President of Latvia an assurance to this effect. I may add that the French Government have authorized me to make it plain that they stand in the same position in this matter as do His Majesty's Government.

Édouard Daladier, Prime Minister
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GoTfan
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« Reply #389 on: March 07, 2023, 11:07:08 PM »

Billy Hughes on the recent statements by the UK

The Australian government stands steadfastly in support of the recent declaration made by the Foreign Secretary. Wanton aggression cannot be allowed to go throughout this world.
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« Reply #390 on: March 07, 2023, 11:20:01 PM »

Mikhail Tukhachevsky on the recent statements by the UK

Our intelligence services have been telling us that the Germans are planning to invade the Baltics. That's why the Sovjets have been holding preparations in order to assist the Baltic nations in case they would be attacked. Secondly, we've invited the heads of states to Moscow to start diplomatic talks and offer them protection, but our demands were met with resistance due to lack of mutual trust. Still, we urge Germany to not attack these nations and respect their territorial integrity. In times of hardship, we stand with our fellow Slavic people.
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windjammer
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« Reply #391 on: March 08, 2023, 01:55:13 AM »

President Koc is pleased to announce an agreement has been reached between Poland and the United States:

Agreements between the United States of America and the Republic of Poland

1) It shall be known that our greats nations are being led by two presidents sharing the same ideology that could be summed in three words: pacifism, capitalism and christianity.

2) For this reason, in order to promote peace and prosperity, the United States of America and the Polish Republic have come to the following decision:
- The United States of America will grant a loan to the Polish Republic so it can continue to  develop its country in a capitalist way.
- The Republic of Poland pledges to look primarily at the United States when they have to import various stuff regarding the defense industry. A delegation of polish industrials led by the current Polish Secretary of State  Walery Sławek shall visit the USA, so shall a decision of American industrials visit Poland.
-A joint institution shall be created to promote trade between Poland and the USA notably regarding the import of american goods for the polish defense industry.

3) the loan will be paid back within 15 years at the appropriate interest for this kind of things





x PRESIDENT KOC


We deeply thank the United States for their support. Nation that we consider as friend.

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S019
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« Reply #392 on: March 08, 2023, 01:56:01 AM »

President Koc is pleased to announce an agreement has been reached between Poland and the United States:

Agreements between the United States of America and the Republic of Poland

1) It shall be known that our greats nations are being led by two presidents sharing the same ideology that could be summed in three words: pacifism, capitalism and christianity.

2) For this reason, in order to promote peace and prosperity, the United States of America and the Polish Republic have come to the following decision:
- The United States of America will grant a loan to the Polish Republic so it can continue to  develop its country in a capitalist way.
- The Republic of Poland pledges to look primarily at the United States when they have to import various stuff regarding the defense industry. A delegation of polish industrials led by the current Polish Secretary of State  Walery Sławek shall visit the USA, so shall a decision of American industrials visit Poland.
-A joint institution shall be created to promote trade between Poland and the USA notably regarding the import of american goods for the polish defense industry.

3) the loan will be paid back within 15 years at the appropriate interest for this kind of things





x PRESIDENT KOC


We deeply thank the United States for their support. Nation that we consider as friend.



X President William Borah
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« Reply #393 on: March 08, 2023, 05:54:48 AM »

Alfred Hugenberg responds:

"We firmly deny the accusations, made by the dirt of the planet trying to cover up its own criminal intentions, related to a German intervention in the Baltics. There is only one threat to the sovereignty of the Baltic states, and that is the monster of the East, the Red Plague, the Bolshevik horde."
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« Reply #394 on: March 08, 2023, 12:52:54 PM »

Generalissimo Chiang Addresses the Nation (1938)

Yesterday, we received a message of an attack on our western border. The people of Xinjiang faced a deliberate and unprovoked assault by the Red Army. The Soviet government was on friendly terms with us mere days before this betrayal. Even today, they claim to be open to diplomacy. But it is clear that they have no interest in negotiation. They have lost all credibility with this breach of the peace. This day of treachery will live in infamy.

Thus, I am left with no choice but to declare war on the Soviet Union. We will strike back against the Bolshevist menace and protect our homeland from those who would destroy it. We will overcome the threat of our would-be conquerors. The men who died defending Kashgar will not have died in vain.

I call upon the other nations of the world to take a stand against the scourge of Bolshevism. These dangerous radicals seek to spread their fanatical ideology by any means necessary. The Soviets cannot be reasoned with or trusted at their word. Their subversives lurk in the shadows, scheming to spread their revolution to every corner of the globe. We must neutralize the Bolshevist threat once and for all. Do not legitimize the Soviet government through diplomacy or through trade. Make them feel the pressure of a united front against their evil ideology. The road ahead is hard, but we shall overcome if we stand together.
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Lumine
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« Reply #395 on: March 08, 2023, 01:35:14 PM »


CRISIS

Terror attack in Ukraine!
Insurgents stage surprising assault on Mezhyhirya Residence,
Largest act of defiance in living memory, Red Army mobilizes in Kiev,
Leading Bolsheviks Grigory Petrovsky and Stanislaw Kosior killed

FOR: USSR

Few parts of the Soviet Union had endured as much pain as the Ukrainian SSR, the largest victim of a mass famine during the early 1930s which had sparked unprecedented international criticism of the Soviet Union. And though the famine may have eventually been left behind - partly due to the actions of Stalin's protegé Nikita Khrushchev -, resentment may have not receded in the slightest on account of recent events. With the continued lack of leadership disrupting the government machinery, it was left to the surviving high ranking officers of the Communist Party of Ukraine to keep things running, a task not aided by increasing acts of defiance in large cities that were, at least domestically, portrayed as the work of a few malcontents.

Matters seem to have escalated to an extent no one thought possible, as reports began to arrive from Kiev of gunfire and a major explosion at the Mezhyhirya Residence, the summer residence of the Communist Party. Several Red Army companies were met by gunfire, resulting in a prolonged battle that produced over two dozen casualties before undetermined groups of assailants withdrew into the neighboring woods. It was quickly determined that a large terrorist group had attempted to storm the residence, blowing it up with explosives when resistance proved tougher than expected by the guards. Among the casualties there were several high ranking members of the party, including the two top officials in Ukraine: Grigory Petrovsky, Chairman of the Central Executive Committee; and Stanislav Kosior, First Secretary of the Ukrainian Communist Party.

Although further details appear to be limited, it is reported that the Red Army has mobilized across the city of Kiev in its hunt for the assailants, considered likely to be Ukrainian nationalists. This act of violence, the largest show of defiance to Moscow in living memory, is coupled with unconfirmed reports of military maneuvers in key Soviet cities and of the disappearance of a number of high ranking party and military officials.
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« Reply #396 on: March 08, 2023, 04:12:54 PM »
« Edited: March 08, 2023, 06:21:29 PM by Lumine »


CRISIS

Coup d'etat in Czechoslovakia!
Military, establishment joins forces to cancel election, citing dangers,
General Syrovy to lead government, crackdown against fascists and communists,
Street fighting in the cities, ethnic minorities revolt across the nation

FOR: EUROPEAN PLAYERS

By all accounts, the Czechoslovakian election campaign promised to be the most memorable in the young nation's history. The Communist and Fascist parties started a major push across the nation, showing remarkable and unexpected organization and availability of resources. So much so, that foreign correspondents noted with irony that the extremist parties appeared to be far better funded than their establishment foes in the Petka parties. A similar phenomenon was detected on the separate ethnic parties, all of which began to adopt an increasingly critical line against Prague whilst also mobilizing their voters in an unprecedented effort. Thus, it was broadly expected that there would be a hung parliament, with a lack of clarity on whether General Gadja, Gottwald or the Petka would emerge victorious. This was not to be. As the political environment grew more tense and newly created fascist and communist paramilitary groups started to brawl daily on the streets of Prague, a storm was brewing. Talk of a coup in the making proved not to be a rumor, but a full-fledged reality.

One week before Election Day, the Army suddenly mobilized from its barracks as LT-35 swarmed the streets of the country's major cities. A radio broadcast from the capital announced the formation of an emergency government, with Acting President Malpetyr suspending the elections and empowering General Jan Syrovy, the General Inspector to become Prime Minister. Syrovy, for his part, gave a lengthy speech warning of "grave danger to Czechoslovakia". Among other reasons for the coup, Syrovy cited foreign intervention with the upcoming elections, alleged plans for a German invasion in case of a communist victory, evidence of separate planned coups by both the fascist and communist forces, and the need to "preserve the unity of the nation". Over the next few hours, the Czechoslovak Army was able to seize control of all government buildings and the mass media, which for the most part cooperated willingly by broadcasting and printing stories supporting the emergency government. An initial "decapitation strike" was able to arrest both Gadja and Gottwald and disrupt the extremist paramilitary forces, which have been all but crushed within Prague itself.

This rapid success was for the most part matched across the bulk of Czechia and Czech-majority areas, as well as with a swift occupation of the Ukrainian-majority Subcarpathian Rus. However, the surviving units of the Communist and Fascist paramilitaries have now mobilized in other large cities, and remain locked in bitter fights with the Army as they hope for support before collapsing. General Syrovy has wasted little time in presented what is claimed to be evidence of vote-rigging plans in captured Communist and Fascist strongholds as further justification for this dramatic course of action. This, however, has harshly contrasted with the ethnic side of the affair. Against the expectations of Prague, which expected to find the biggest resistance amongst the extremist paramilitary, the coup has been resisted from the start by the German, Hungarian, Ukrainian and Slovak minorities, with their respective political leadership taking swift action to mobilize resistance. Across the Sudetenland, ethnic German units have either refused to comply with orders and/or began to desert, whilst German National Front leader Konrad Heinlein has call for resistance and urged Berlin to take action.

In Slovakia, the coup failed in Bratislava as the ethnically Slovak troops resisted their officers, embraced by a supportive population. Andrej Hlinka, the most prominent Slovak leader, has already called for a Slovak uprising. Across the Czechoslovak-Hungarian frontier, and looking towards their brethren on the demilitarized side of the border, a split has shown up within the Hungarian Czechs. Whereas the senior leader Janos Esterhazy has issued an appeal for pacific resistance, his deputy Andor Jaross has echoed the calls for revolt, and called for Budapest to intervene. In Zaolzie, the city of Bohumin is under firm military control, and a delegation of ethnic Poles has crossed the border to ask Warsaw to safeguard their interests. And, in the Subcarpathian Rus, military occupation has prevented a coordinated uprising, but there are reports of infighting as well.

With the coup's fate hanging on the balance and Czechoslovakia on the breaking point, no observer dares predict what will follow.
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Dereich
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« Reply #397 on: March 08, 2023, 04:33:34 PM »

His Majesty's Government congratulates Prime Minister Syrovy on his successful defense of Czechoslovakian sovereignty and calls for a peaceful restoration of proper parliamentary government once order has been restored.
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YPestis25
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« Reply #398 on: March 08, 2023, 04:38:15 PM »

Quai d’Orsay Recognizes Syrovy Government

The French Government recognizes the Syrovy government in Prague as the legitimate government of Czechoslovakia. The continued maintenance and territorial integrity of the Czechoslovak Republic is of paramount importance to the French Republic and her allies and Foreign Minister Joseph Paul-Bouncour urges Europe to follow suit.
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« Reply #399 on: March 08, 2023, 04:41:31 PM »

The German Reich fully and throughoutly refuses to recognise the usurper Jan Syrovy as the Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia, strongly condemns his illegal and dishonourable actions and demands his immediate resignation and incarceration.
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