ALEA IACTA EST: A Roman Republic Game (Gameplay Thread)
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Lumine
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« on: December 11, 2017, 08:14:41 PM »

ALEA IACTA EST:
A Roman Republic Game:
By Lumine


Players:

In the city of Rome:

Gnaeus Pompey Magnus, Grain Commisioner and Proconsul (Dkrol)
Marcus Porcius Cato, Senator and head of the Optimate faction (Dereich)
Publius Clodius Pulcher, Senator and head of the Clodian faction (Kingpoleon)
Marcus Tullius Cicero, Senator (YPestis25)

Across the East:

Marcus Licinius Crassus, Roman Proconsul (LouisvilleThunder)
Orodes II, Shah of the Parthian Empire (leonardothered)
Ptolemy XII Auletes, King of Egypt (Garlan Gunter)

In Gaul:

Gaius Julius Caesar, Roman Proconsul (GoTfan)
Vercingetorix, Arverni Prince (Windjammer)
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Lumine
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2017, 08:18:41 PM »

The Families:


The Julii Caesares:

Head: Gaius Julius Caesar (100 BC) m. Calpurnia (75 BC)
Issue: None living
Important relatives:
1.   Julia the Elder (103 BC) and Julia the Younger (101 BC), sisters
2.   Octavia (69 BC) and Gaius Octavius (63 BC), grandnephew and grandniece
3.   Lucius Julius Caesar (105 BC), his cousin
4.   Lucius Julius Caesar (74 BC), son of Lucius
5.   Sextus Julius Caesar (71 BC), distant cousin

The Licinii Crassi:

Head: Marcus Licinius Crassus (115 BC) m. Tertulla (110 BC)
Issue:
1.   Marcus Licinius Crassus (85 BC) m. Caecilia Metella (80 BC), son Marcus (64 BC)
2.   Publius Licinius Crassus (82 BC) m. Cornelia Metella (73 BC), no issue

The Pompeii Magni:

Head: Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (106 BC), widowed
Issue:
1.   Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (71 BC)
2.   Pompeia Magna (69 BC) m. Faustus Cornelius Sulla (85 BC), no issue
3.   Sextus Pompeius Magnus (67 BC)

The Porcii Catones:

Head: Marcus Porcius Cato (95 BC), divorced
Issue:
1.   Marcius Porcius Cato (73 BC)
2.   Porcia (70 BC) m. Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus (102 BC), no issue
Important relatives:
1.   Porcia (98 BC), his sister, m. Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus (106 BC)
2.   Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus (72 BC), Porcia’s son
3.   Servilia Caepionis (104 BC), his widowed half sister
4.   Marcus Junius Brutus (85 BC), Servilia’s son
5.   Junia Prima, Junia Secunda, Junia Tertia and Marcus Junius Silanus, Servilia’s other daughters and son
6.   Servilia the Younger (95 BC), his other widowed half sister
7.   Lucius Licinius Lucullus the Younger (65 BC), Servilia the Younger’s son

The Clodii Pulcher:

Head: Publius Clodius Pulcher (93 BC) m. Fulvia (83 BC)
Issue:
1.   Publius Clodius Pulcher (60 BC)
2.   Claudia Pulchra (56 BC)
Important relatives:
1.   Appius Claudius Pulcher (97 BC), his widowed brother
2.   Claudia the Elder (72 BC) and the Younger (70 BC), Appius’s daughters
3.   Gaius Claudius Pulcher (95 BC), his brother
4.   Several sisters, including the widowed Clodia (94 BC)

The Tulii Cicerones:

Head: Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC) m. Terentia (98 BC)
Issue:
1.   Tullia (78 BC) m. Furius Crasipes (100 BC), no issue
2.   Marcus Tullius Cicero Minor (65 BC)
Important relatives:
1.   Quintus Tullius Cicero (102 BC), his brother, m. Pomponia (88 BC)
2.   Quintus Tullius Cicero Minor (64 BC)

The Arsacid Dynasty:

Head: Orodes II of Parthia (99 BC) m. Laodice of Commagene (84 BC)
Issue:
1.   Pacorus (63 BC)
2.   Phraates (60 BC)
3.   Near two dozen sons and daughters of concubines
Important relatives:
1.   Mithridates (64 BC), his nephew (in hiding)
2.   Antiochus Theos I of Commagene, his father-in-law

The Ptolemaic Dynasty:

Head: Ptolemy XII Auletes (117 BC), widowed
Issue:
1.   Cleopatra (69 BC)
2.   Arsinoe (66 BC)
3.   Ptolemy the Elder (62 BC)
4.   Ptolemy the Younger (59 BC)

The Arverni Clan:

Head: Gobanitio (111 BC), widowed
Issue:
1.   Vercassivellaunos (75 BC)
Important relatives:
1.   Vercingetorix (80 BC), his nephew
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Lumine
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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2017, 09:13:24 PM »
« Edited: December 12, 2017, 03:53:51 PM by Lumine »

53 BC, Military and Strategic Situation:


Gaius Julius Caesar:
-Army of Gaul: 9 Legions, 54,000 strong.
-Auxiliary Forces: 10,000 strong (4,000 cavalry).
(Cannot recruit more men without approval from the Senate.)

Marcus Licinius Crassus:
-Army of Syria: 7 Legions, 42,000 strong.
-Auxiliary Forces: 8,000 strong (4,000 cavalry).
(Cannot recruit more men without approval from the Senate.)

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus:
-Army of Lusitania: 2 Legions, 10,000 strong.
-Army of Hispania Ulterior: 2 Legions, 10,000 strong.
-Army of Hispania Citerior: 2 Legions, 10,000 strong.
(Cannot recruit more men without approval from the Senate.)

Orodes II of Parthia:
-Army of Parthia: 60,000 strong (35,000 infantry, 15,000 cavalry)
(Can recruit 10,000 men this year)

Ptolemy XII of Egypt:
-Army of Egypt: 17,000 strong (16,000 infantry, 1,000 cavalry)
-Gabiniani Legionaries: 3,000 strong
(Can recruit 5,000 men this year)

Vercingetorix:
-Personal Retinue: 1,000 strong
(Army recruitment depends on turn crises)
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Lumine
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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2017, 10:34:02 PM »

53 BC: Turn One:


General View:

Caesar has lost a legion against Ambiorix's revolt, but has pushed the rebels back into the lands of the Belgae. Crassus prepares for his eastern expedition in Syria as the eyes of the world as put on him. Rome faces untold violence at the hands of Clodius and Milo and there's fear of anarchy in the city. In Parthia, Orodes II prepares to fight back against the potential Roman invasion, and new developments may be taking place in Egypt and Gaul...

Player Crisis:

Gaius Julius Caesar:
-Senate Popularity: 5/10
-Public Popularity: 7/10
-Wealth: Medium (Several debts still to be paid)

Imperator,

-After saving Quintus Cicero's legion from a siege you have pushed Ambiorix and his Belgae rebels back into their own lands, but at the cost of losing an entire legion. At the east and close to the Rhine stands Ambiorix with his army of Eburones. At the North you have the forces of the rebel  Nervii and Menapii tribes. Beyond the Rhine, a few German tribes who aided Ambiorix on his revolt. Counting on the might of your combined forces and the allied Atrebate forces of Commius, how will you defeat the powerful Belgian tribes and put an end to this revolt?

-The loss of an entire legion is a tough blow for your forces in Gaul, often too small to hold such a vast territory. Your legates (particularly Antonius, Trebonius and Q. Cicero) strongly agree that new forces are needed, but your options are limited. One route is to seek the approval of the Senate to raise one or two more legions from Italy, which would likely be met by fierce resistance from Cato. Another would be to borrow one of Pompey's legions in Hispania, even though your ties have been severed after Julia's death. A third option is to raise some auxiliary forces in the Cisalpine and Narbonese Gaul, although this could give ammunition to your enemies.

-The situation in Rome continues to deteriorate as Clodius and Milo take their rivalry to the extreme, many fearing the city might fall apart on street fighting. While you remain at a large distance in Gaul you still have some significant influence to play. Will you seek to renew your bonds with Crassus and Pompey and continue the increasingly unstable Triumvirate? Perhaps, seek a different course despite the risks?

Marcus Licinius Crassus:
-Senate Popularity: 6/10
-Public Popularity: 3/10
-Wealth: Very High

Imperator,

-At your military council in Antioch your legates Octavius, Vargunteius and Censorinus, quaestor Cassius and your brilliant son Publius gather to discuss the situation: Parthia has just left a damaging civil war and stands weakened, although at the same time your army lacks experience and suffers from low morale after being "cursed" while leaving Rome. Cassius is of the opinion the army should spend the year on further training and a minor campaign before embarking on an invasion of Parthia, whereas Publius leads those who believe the moment is now or never. What will you do?

-A message has arrived along with an ambassador from King Artavasdes of Armenia, proposing an alliance in a war against Parthia. Promising an army of more than 40,000 to complement your forces, Artavasdes's proposal is nonetheless dependant on you taking the much longer route of invading through Armenia alongside the King, rather than a quick march across Mesopotamia. Cassius, while supportive of the idea, also reminds you that should Artavasdes's forces fight alongside you in the campaign he would be entitled to a large part of the treasury and rewards, perhaps an even larger share than yours as you must divide your gains with your army and the Roman treasury. What will you say?

-Concerning news from Rome as tensions flare up, and with your sons in the campaign or with Caesar you're left with your army of clients to support your position. Metellus Scipio, father in law of your son Publius is one of the chief candidates to become consul, and while a staunch friend and supporter of Cato he has expressed his interest in having your support given your family ties. Alas, as an enemy to Caesar said support would diminish your standing among the popular forces, while boosting your support inside the nobility and the conservatives. Will you take sides on this election?

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus:
-Senate Popularity: 3/10
-Public Popularity: 8/10
-Wealth: High

Imperator,

-For the past few years Titus Annius Milo has been a useful weapon against Clodius thanks to his gangs. Alas, due to his rising popularity and support Milo is now a serious candidate for consul, even though he is running against your ally Publius Plautius Hypaseus, and against Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, with whom you have some friendly ties despite his marriage to your ex-wife Mucia. Has the time to come to sever ties with Milo and seek to block his rise, or redouble the friendship with a rising star on Roman politics?

-The death of your beloved wife Julia has left you devastated, but you have slowly tried to recover from the blow. There are those among your friends who believe you should marry to bolster your damaged standing before the aristocracy and the Senate (or find a wife for your eldest son Gnaeus), although the odd voice here and there believes that the Senate may not accept you regardless of what you do. Will you try to remarry?

-Two of your clients, the tribunes M. Coelius and C. Lucilius have taken you and the Senate by surprise by introducing a motion to make you dictator to restore order in Rome (more on this on the Senate Thread), a proposal strongly resisted by the optimates but actually popular among many citizens inside the city who see you as a hero. What will you do about this motion?

Marcus Tullius Cicero:
-Senate Popularity: 7/10
-Public Popularity: 5/10
-Wealth: Very Low

Cicero,

-You've managed to evade exile and political oblivion despite the sheer hostility of Clodius, but as he prepares to run for praetor you run the risk once again of being put on trial for what your enemies describe as the unlawful execution of Catiline's supporters a decade ago. Clearly you'll need strong friends or a strong political position to remain relevant and politically alive, but how can you secure a comeback?

-Always a helpful friend to keep you safe from Clodius, Titus Milo is now a candidate for the consulship and a favorite to win. Despite your close links, you also possess a friendship with Pompeius that goes all the way to your service together as military cadets, a matter increasingly complicated as Pompeius and Milo seem to drift apart for the moment. Can you keep a balance of support? Will you take an active role in ensuring Milo is elected?

-The biggest problem in your family at this moment is that of money, as even though you possess a certain number of villas you do not have significant funds or major sources of income, leaving you unable to spend extra resources to relaunch your career or build a stronger net of supporters and clients. Can you find a way to get out of your terrible financial situation?

Marcus Porcius Cato:
-Senate Popularity: 8/10
-Public Popularity: 3/10
-Wealth: Very Low

Cato,

-The last few years have seen a tough struggle against the Triumvirs, one which nonetheless your small Optimate faction has waged well enough to survive and recover influence as Crassus, Pompeius and Caesar drift apart from each other. Still, fighting the Triumvirs on one side and Clodius on the other is no easy matter. Can you keep the influence of your enemies contained despite the odds, and see your friend Metellus Scipio elected consul?

-You see the rise of Caesar with more and more disdain as time goes by, even more as there is talk of him wanted to expand his armies. For years you've lobbied for him to lose his command, but as his popularity in the city grows because of his exploits, can you find a way to finally best Caesar and at least deny him those reinforcements for his wars in Gaul?

-Next year (52 BC), you will have reached the legal requirements to run for consul in 51 BC, which could prove a decisive victory for the Optimates. On the other hand, your famous refusal to ever use bribes or campaign in an orthodox manner might make things complicated. Will you start laying an early groundwork for that future campaign? If so, how?
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Lumine
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« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2017, 10:56:41 PM »

Publius Clodius Pulcher:
-Senate Popularity: 2/10
-Public Popularity: 8/10
-Wealth: Low

Clodius,

-Forced to drop your candidacy for 53 BC due to the street fights, you have finally been able to stand for election to praetor, another decisive step in your rise to the top. Yet winning may not be easy with all the enemies you have, even with the goodwill of many of the dispossesed, and particularly not with Milo's gangs on the way. Can you find the path to electoral victory, and to stop Milo from being elected consul?

-As the political situation shifts, so do allegiances. For the time being you've supported Ceasar in exchange for ocassional help from him, but as the Triumvirate appears to be drifting appart new opportunities could arise. Will you seek to change your political relationship with Caesar? Perhaps approach new allies inside the city?

-One thing people can be sure of is that those who are your mortal enemies pay the price, as the deceased King of Cyprus can attest to. Yet Cicero stands still alive, still relevant despite your best efforts to knock him down. Clearly his influence can be danger to your career and your standing, even more so as Cicero is close to your rival Milo. Will you seek to put an end to Cicero's career once and for all?

Orodes II:
-Popularity: 6/10
-Wealth: Very High

Great Shah,

-You finally stand as the near undisputed ruler of the Parthian Empire after the defeat and demise of your brother Mithridates, yet not all is well. Parthia has suffered significant losses in the civil war and requires time to heal, not to mention Mithridates's young son of the same time has been taken away by some diehard supporters to hide far away from the capital. Can you restore control over the empire?

-A vast Roman army stands on the sands of Syria led by the famous Marcus Crassus, posing a very real threat to Parthia despite you holding brilliant generals like Surena. On one side, his armies are vast and can match you in numbers due to losses from the civil war, and on the other, it can be argued the Parthian forces (particularly the cavalry) are well trained enough to prove more effective than expected. Can you put a stop to Crassus's ambition?

-Key for the war effort could be the support of the client kingdoms of Parthia in the west, particularly the virtually independent Palmyra and Osroene. Can you keep them on side and supportive of your position against the Roman threat?

Ptolemy XII Auletes:
-Popularity: 3/10
-Wealth: Medium

Great King,

-You've recovered your throne after punishing and executing your rebel daughters, but your reign may not last for very long. Your health is poor, and the prospect of succession is hardly encouraging as Cleopatra, your brilliant daughter and co-regent, has made too many enemies, and young prince Ptolemy is not exactly the definition of a competent successor even accounting for his youth. How will you navigate the complicated politics of dynastic succession?

-The presence of Crassus and his vast armies in Syria continue to concern you deeply. Crassus was one of your biggest enemies in Rome, and you have reasons to fear the idea of him becoming the conqueror of Parthia. On the other side of the issue, as Chief Eunuch Pothinus points out, aiding Crassus on his plans might actually earn his goodwill. How will you handle the issue of this ambitious Roman general?

-Angry missives arrive from Rome as the friends of famed financer Rabirius (who lent Egypt money and came to reform the finances before you expelled him, Great King) angrily ask for the sums he invested to be returned, a claim which has been argued against by your ambassadors in Rome as Rabirius is seen in Egypt as guilty of extorsion. How shall this complex matter be handled?


Vercingetorix:
-Popularity: 6/10
-Wealth: Low

Prince Vercingetorix,

-For years you've watched Caesar fight and conquer endless Gaulish tribes that have fought separatedly, seeing the whole region fall into the hands of the Romans as most tribes stand helpless and even refuse to support the Belgian revolt of Ambiorix. You dream of a Gaul strong enough and united enough to drive back the Romans, but can this be accomplished?

-Despite the popularity you have with the warriors and the poor people inside the lands of the Arverni, your uncle Gobanitio has made a point of barring you from entry to the capital in Gergovia, fearing the consecuences of your constant talk against the Romans. On the bright side, you can count on a strong retinue of noblemen and warriors, the support of your cousin Vercassivellaunos and should you wish it, thousands of Arverni who would rise against any enemy if you wanted to. Is there an opportunity to exploit?
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Lumine
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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2017, 11:09:36 PM »

Election Guide:


Overview: The campaign for the elections of this year is in full swing as we speak, in what promises to be an exciting competition to secure the magistratures for 52 BC. Let us take a look at the present situation: the current consuls are Cn. Domitius Calvinus and M. Valerius Messala, both close to the Triumvirs and particularly to Caesar. So let us take a look at the four candidates for consul this year:

Patrician Candidates (1 to be elected):

Q. Caecilius Metellus Scipio (Optimate)
M. Aemilius Scaurus (Pro-Triumvirs)

Plebebian Candidates (1 to be elected):

T. Annius Milo (Neutral, Anti-Clodius)
P. Plautius Hypaseus (Pro-Pompeius and Pro-Clodius)

Quite a competition as you can see, with the frontrunner as this point being Metellus Scipio and Annius Milo to become next years's consuls. Still, it is early in the campaign, so the outcome may be very differently depending on the endorsements and the intervention of the most prominent Senators in the electoral contest. As to the tribunes, it should be noted the ten tribunes of the plebs of this year are roughly considered to be divided as follows:

Tribunes of the Plebs:
Pro-Pompey: 3
Pro-Clodius: 2
Neutral: 2
Pro-Crassus: 1
Pro-Caesar: 1
Pro-Optimate: 1

For next year, the current prediction is that the pro-Clodius forces would make gains in the tribunes, possibly gaining one or two more. Another belief is that Milo will attempt to field supporters of his own as tribunes, and that he may very well succeed in electing at least a tribune to support him. The losses are widely expected to come from the Triumvirs at this point, particularly with Caesar and Crassus far away from Rome.

Finally, it should be noted Clodius himself is running for Praetor this time, currently seen to be contesting third or second place in votes and getting elected with ease.
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DKrol
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« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2017, 08:03:28 PM »


Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus
53 BC

A Speech to the People of Rome

I, G. Pompeius Magnus, declare my support for M. Aemilius Scaurus and T. Annius Milo for the consulships. I call on all my clients, friends, family, and supports to cast their votes for these candidates. M. Aemilius Scaurus and T. Annius Milo will serve Rome with honor and dignity. They are both men of strength and resolve who will restore law and order to our great city and the entire Republic. They will end the gang culture that has allowed fear to grip our city and disrupt our lives.

I also call upon the Senate to appoint me as dictator for the year. Our city is under attack from within. Italy is under attack from without. We need a strong man to step in and right the wrongs that ail us. We need a single individual with absolute command to step in and secure our city and our Republic, or our days will be limited. With my successes in military commands during Sulla's Civil War, in combat versus pirates, and with the Third Mithridatic War, my abilities are known and my prowess is not questioned. If appointed dictator, I promise to the people of Rome that the city will be safer when I leave office than when I assumed it.

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Lumine
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2017, 07:46:08 PM »

Pompeius Magnus marries Cornelia Postuma


After the devastating loss of his wife Julia - daughter of pontifex maximus Gaius Julius Caesar -, many wondered how would Pompeius recover from the blow, and whether he would marry again. Four time he had married, having divorced his first and third wives Antistia and Mucia and lost the first and the fourth Aemilia Scaura and Julia in childbirth. Alas, the fifth time was promptly set into motion as Pompeius stumbled into what appeared to be the perfect bride: Cornelia Postuma, the posthumous child of dictator Lucius Cornelius Sulla and his last wife Valeria. Postuma, having lived with the Valerii Messallae during her life, was still unwed at 26 due to finding past claimants "unsuitable".

Despite his advancing age Pompeius was seen as an appropriate suitor by Postuma, particularly due to his ties with her admired late father. In the end, Postuma readily accepted an offer by Pompeius, and the marriage was celebrated early in the year. The happy occasion not only strengthened Pompeius's ties with some of the more aristocratic (but not necessarily conservative) families in the Senate and some of Sulla's old supporters, more importantly, it managed to bring consul M. Valerius Messala Rufus (Postuma's uncle) on side as Messalla openly took Pompeius's side against the more pro-Crassus and pro-Caesar consul Domitius Calvinus.

The marriage celebration and feast was considered a happy affair, although darkened somewhat by the refusal of some prominent nobles to attend in protest for Pompeius's campaign to become dictator and some rather eloquent paintings in the street portraying Pompeius and his new bride on a rather unflattering light. For the time being, the marriage seems a solid match that should give the famous general extra influence at a time in which he needs it the most.
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Garlan Gunter
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« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2017, 06:13:08 AM »

EDICT OF PTOLEMY THE KING, ISSUED AT ALEXANDRIA

As a sworn ally of Rome with her best interests at heart, the Pharaoh and King announces that he looks with favour upon the proposed Dictatorship of Gn. Pompeius Magnus and urges all Roman friends to Egypt in the Senate to lend the motion their support. As a vouchsafe of his own kingdom’s current and future friendship, he further announces the betrothal of his younger daughter the princess Arsinoe to Gn. Pompeius the Younger.
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Lumine
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« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2017, 02:53:46 PM »

“Citizens! I speak to you today to speak out in favor of my own education. I pledge that, should I be elected, free grain for the poor will be guaranteed, and the amounts will be increased by 20%. Furthermore, I intend to have all freed-men, plebeians, and patricians be guaranteed the amount of eighty denarii for every son they have, for the first two sons, and sixty denarii for the third and fourth. This will be paid out at birth, and twice this amount will be given to the parents on the child’s twelfth birthday and on the child’s sixteenth birthday. On his sixteenth birthday, if the son joins the military, he will be guaranteed a fifty denarii grant for joining, and his parents will be guaranteed a ninety denarii grant. This only applies so long as the Republic needs his services as a soldier.

“I would also like to propose that we raise the pay of the legionaries to 225 denarii annually after five years, but with a starting salary of 125 denarii for the first year, 150 denarii the second, and so on. By thus increasing the amount, our legionaries will be better able to afford their expenses and food, and we will not need to make future payments of land or property if they are paid higher amounts.

“Finally, I intend to create a Roman library, where the knowledge of our times will be stored. The librarians will allow one denarii to read twenty pages, or to copy a page assigned by the librarian from our most important works for every twenty pages read. The donation of writings will be judged by the librarians, and the donor will be awarded anywhere from two pages to read for every page donated, or as much as twenty pages to read for every page donated.

“Fellow Romans! By raising public spending and by auditing the Roman treasury, I assure you that we will raise Rome to levels never before seen. The Roman people are quite probably the greatest people in all the world. We will raise the pay of our legionaries. We will feed our hungry. We will become a center of learning, besides being a center of culture and power. Right now, we are a dimly lit city. Vote for me, and I asssure you that we will be a shining city on a mountain apart from all others. Long live the Republic!”

Turn ended hours ago, this will not be taken into account.
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Kingpoleon
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2017, 04:43:43 PM »

“Citizens! I speak to you today to speak out in favor of my own education. I pledge that, should I be elected, free grain for the poor will be guaranteed, and the amounts will be increased by 20%. Furthermore, I intend to have all freed-men, plebeians, and patricians be guaranteed the amount of eighty denarii for every son they have, for the first two sons, and sixty denarii for the third and fourth. This will be paid out at birth, and twice this amount will be given to the parents on the child’s twelfth birthday and on the child’s sixteenth birthday. On his sixteenth birthday, if the son joins the military, he will be guaranteed a fifty denarii grant for joining, and his parents will be guaranteed a ninety denarii grant. This only applies so long as the Republic needs his services as a soldier.

“I would also like to propose that we raise the pay of the legionaries to 225 denarii annually after five years, but with a starting salary of 125 denarii for the first year, 150 denarii the second, and so on. By thus increasing the amount, our legionaries will be better able to afford their expenses and food, and we will not need to make future payments of land or property if they are paid higher amounts.

“Finally, I intend to create a Roman library, where the knowledge of our times will be stored. The librarians will allow one denarii to read twenty pages, or to copy a page assigned by the librarian from our most important works for every twenty pages read. The donation of writings will be judged by the librarians, and the donor will be awarded anywhere from two pages to read for every page donated, or as much as twenty pages to read for every page donated.

“Fellow Romans! By raising public spending and by auditing the Roman treasury, I assure you that we will raise Rome to levels never before seen. The Roman people are quite probably the greatest people in all the world. We will raise the pay of our legionaries. We will feed our hungry. We will become a center of learning, besides being a center of culture and power. Right now, we are a dimly lit city. Vote for me, and I asssure you that we will be a shining city on a mountain apart from all others. Long live the Republic!”

Turn ended hours ago, this will not be taken into account.

Deleted. My apologies - I thought I had deposited it earlier, then I pulled up the tab and realized I hadn’t.
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Huey Long is a Republican
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« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2017, 04:44:49 PM »

So, when is the next turn going to be posted?
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Dereich
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« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2017, 04:47:28 PM »


Be patient! Writing up the first turn's results and coming up with/writing stuff for the new turn is a lot of work!
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« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2017, 04:55:42 PM »


Be patient! Writing up the first turn's results and coming up with/writing stuff for the new turn is a lot of work!

I was just asking. Not being impatient. I apologize if it seems that way.
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Lumine
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« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2017, 07:53:06 PM »

53 BC:

The dictatorship of Pompeius


Sick and tired of the growing political violence of the past two years, many Romans were convinced the city needed firm, strong leadership to take on its many problems. To them, the proposal of the tribunes Coelius and Lucilius to appoint Pompeius dictator to end the chaos was music to their ears, an effect amplified by the decision of Pompeius to firmly support the proposal in public and seek the dictatorship himself. Even though the memories of Sulla were still alive and powerful due to the countless families (particularly knights) who had suffered from the proscriptions, Pompeius had an enormously high status as Rome’s leading general and military hero, and a career filled with special offices which nonetheless had the distinction of Pompeius never attempting to topple the state despite having had the power to do so in the past.

And even more, the proposal turned out to be one the Triumvirs would support. Buoyed by the countless pedarii clients of Crassus, the populist supporters of Caesar and the endless stream of moderates seduced by Cicero’s support, Pompeius formed a large-scale front in the Senate which appeared to be invincible. With Clodius leading efforts to oppose the motion that were considered to be half-hearted by many, it was left to Marcus Porcius Cato to lead the opposite charge. Citing precedent and downplaying the current gang wars across Rome he staunchly opposed the dictatorship of Pompeius, coming close to toppling the proposal after many senators reacted in outrage to the news that the younger Pompeius would be marrying the Egyptian Princess Arsinoe. Alas, even by bringing otherwise hostile senators to his side Cato was still unable to beat the massive political machine of the Triumvirate, which carried the day (narrowly) for Pompeius.

The new dictator got to work immediately with the staunch support of his old allies and of sitting consul Valerius Messalla (uncle to Pompeius’s new wife Cornelia Postuma), immediately raising three legions from his holdings in Umbria and Picenum and from Italian recruits. While a legion put itself in position to guard the border with Cisalpine Gaul and the younger Pompeius led another legion to smash a few groups of pirate raiders across southern Italy, the dictator Pompeius himself had the remaining legion march into Rome to “quell the anarchy”. Ably cooperating with the gangs of Milo the Pompeian troops openly confronted Clodius’s gangs over the course of several days, killing or imprisoning hundreds as the gangs proved no match against disciplined forces. Clodius himself was targeted for arrest (or assassination, depending on the version), leading to escape from Rome.

Pompeius had restored control over Rome as the street violence ended for some time, but the year wasn’t over yet.

Clodius forced to flee Rome, Prince Ptolemy wounded


Determined to see through his ambitious plans for Rome, Publius Clodius Pulcher got to work early to rebuild and reform his own political relationships, establishing key links to relevant senators and laying the groundwork for what seemed to be a rising faction for a few weeks. Bringing new members into his circle of friends like Marcus Antonius and his brothers and Prince Ptolemy the Elder, Clodius opposed Pompeius’s dictatorship and offered a defence of both Caesar and Ptolemy Auletes before the Senate, championing their cause. He also closed new family alliances through marriage, as the young and promising Marcus Antonius married Clodius’s own sister to become his newest brother-in-law.

This political rise began to change as Clodius was the victim of a sustained propaganda campaign from different sides, with some portraying his as excessively close to Crassus (who remained heavily unpopular with many poor citizens) and other leaking some of the more creative proposals of his to young aristocrats, many of whom angrily closed their links to Clodius. Even more controversial was his new friendship with Egypt, leading to the point in which the Gabiniani escort of Prince Ptolemy began to protect the young senator. The end result was that Clodius’s own faction was heavily weakened in support when Pompeius’s new legion stormed the streets of Rome, leading to his gangs being crushed and slaughtered in the brief struggle. Pompeius’s own legionaries came to arrest Clodius, a matter made worse when some of Milo’s gang members tried to assassinate as well. The Gabiniani, under orders to protect Clodius were forced to intervene to save him, leading to a controversial scuffle near Clodius’s house.

When the fight was over both the legionaries and the gang members had to withdraw, but almost a third of the Gabiniani escort was dead and Prince Ptolemy’s face was scarred after being stabbed on one cheek by an angry gang member. With the very real threat of Pomepius’s forces returning Clodius’s wife Fulvia (famous for her courage and temper) seized command of the situation and persuaded her husband to flee. Under the cover of that night, Clodius, Fulvia, their children and Prince Ptolemy and his escort abandoned Rome in a series of encounters with the dictator’s troops. The small group eventually reached Etruria (one of the few regions not occupied by troops), gathering with some of the few surviving friends of Clodius. The news led to the outrage of proconsuls Appius and Gaius Claudius, Clodius’s brothers and proconsuls of Asia and Cilicia, who demanded immediate answers.

Egyptian influence in Rome controversial, Cato the Younger rises


The remainder of Pompeius’s dictatorship proved controversial still not due to a particular legislative agenda of the dictator (who focused on restoring order in Rome itself), but because of Pompeius’s new links. Indeed, the city was privy to the sudden rise of Egyptian influence in the capital due to the efforts of King Ptolemy Auletes, who having sent Prince Ptolemy the Elder into the city with an escort and an embassy secured some highly important accomplishments such as securing the support of the esteemed Cicero, seeing Clodius introduce a motion to make Prince Ptolemy a Roman citizen and, most decisively, securing an alliance through marriage with Pompeius Magnus by the announcement of an unexpected marriage between the younger Pompeius and the Princess Arsinoe. Through skill and intelligence, the Egyptian King seemed to have gained a decisive political triumph.

Alas, the situation soon backfired for his Roman allies: the links gained by these senators with Egypt proved increasingly unpopular amongst the Roman citizens, who saw as nothing less than an outrage that a foreign Prince would be given the citizenship, and worse, that the mighty Pompeius would marry into a foreign royal house, an unthinkable idea to many. The outrage almost collapsed the motion to make Pompeius dictator, it decisively weakened Clodius’s influence and, when the time came for Pompeius to restore order in the city, it led to the unfortunate attack on Prince Ptolemy and the escape of the boy and the Gabiniani to Etruria. One man proved wise enough to use these events and the outrage to his clear advantage: Cato the Younger. Portraying the marriage idea as a sign that Pompeius was contemplating the idea of becoming King, Cato took to the streets.

Bravely campaigning for Scipio in the streets filled with soldiers Cato ensured the talk of Rome was the friendship between Pompeius and Auletes (cast into doubt nonetheless by the wounding of the
Egyptian prince), delivering a heavy blow to Pompeius’s prestige to the point in which half the city saw the dictator as their savior, and the other half as a dangerous tyrant. By the time the elections came Cato rode that wave of support to deliver strong victories for Metellus Scipio as consul (trouncing Pompeius’s candidate Scaurus) and his newest young protégé L. Caecilius Metellus as Aedile, while at the same time sinking the citizenship motion despite the support of the Triumvirs for it. While the election of Titus Annius Milo as consul showed Pompeius’s influence was still strong, the renowned general left his dictatorship as the most divisive man in Rome, and with Cato and his Optimate faction in the clear rise.
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« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2017, 07:53:49 PM »

Gaul in full-scale revolt: Ambiorix and Vercingetorix increase their power


Surprising his own legates, proconsul Gaius Julius Caesar made the fateful decision not to go into the offensive during the year to instead focus on securing his past conquests in Gaul, giving Ambiorix and the Belgian tribes an unexpected chance at rebuilding their defenses and enlarge their own armies after the latest (and still limited) defeat). Building a large main camp to have a centralized base of operations and sending Marcus Antonius to Rome to stand for Quaestor (office he won in a landslide), Caesar was nonetheless undercut by political maneuvering in Rome, as not only a motion of his to raise more forces was defeat and another to limit his spoils passed, Cato the Younger secured an utterly unexpected victory by having a motion to bring Caesar’s command to an end passed with the support of Pompeius, Crassus and Cicero.

With Caesar’s legates and allies utterly angered not only by what they perceived as a betrayal of the Triumvirs, but an inexplicable lack of resistance from Caesar to the end of his command, the proconsul had other issues in mind. Rather than focus on Ambiorix’s immediate threat, Caesar decided to respond with force at the threat of an uprising by the Arverni, sending auxiliary parties (aided by legionaries) to capture the rebel prince Vercingetorix. The move backfired badly as Vercingetorix and his cousin Vercassivellaunos narrowly escaped arrest, enraging the Arverni and other tribes in Gaul as the ultimate sign of Roman arrogance. Aided by thousands of soldiers and followers amongst the poor Vercingetorix saw Gergovia deposing Gobanitio and installing the Arverni prince as their ruler, with Vercingetorix immediately declaring war against Caesar.

As the term in office of the proconsul ended Gaul was split apart by this large scale revolt, as the Atrebates, Remi, Aedui and Bituriges took the Roman side and the mighty Parisii, Senones, Carnutes and the Sequani joined Vercingetorix’s coalition of Celtic tribes, leaving two large armies in command of Vercingetorix and Ambiorix up in arms just as Caesar is mandated to return to Rome by law. The situation in Gaul has turned dangerously critical for Rome, as Caesar’s conquests and accomplishments face a very real threat if the revolts can’t be put down before they expand even further.

Cleopatra tours the east, charms the Hellenistic and Eastern Courts


The efforts by King Ptolemy Auletes to expand the influence of Egypt were not limited in the slightest to the city of Rome itself. His own daughter and co-ruler Cleopatra was sent on an ambitious tour of the east alongside a guard of honor and the presence of the influential eunuch Pothinus as her advisor, travelling to different courts and cities in search for matrimonial alliances to Egypt, including the Princess, the King and other members of the family as potential suitors. The tour, which started in Judaea to a warm welcome for the charming Princess, led Cleopatra into Commagene, Cappadocia, Galatia, Armenia and finally the Bosphoran Kingdom, where Cleopatra finally turned to rapidly sail back into Alexandria.

As a diplomatic effort the tour was widely successful due to Cleopatra’s own charm on account of her beauty, wit and skill. Indeed, several of the eastern monarchs or members of their family were told to have either taken a liking to the young Princess or even an attraction to her, leading to no shortage of tales about supposed promiscuity from Cleopatra (although no affair can substantially be proven, it is said Cleopatra herself was rather friendly to Mitridates of Pergamon and young Prince Arsaces of the Bosphoran Kingdom). The only tragedy of the tour itself was the mysterious drowning of the eunuch Pothinus in a lake, deemed an accidental death by a visibly grieving Princess Cleopatra.

The Princess returned to the capitol to a relatively cold reception by the citizens of Alexandria (who strongly dislike the Princess), seeing firsthand the public outrage at the idea of a marriage between Arsinoe and the younger Pompeius, the crowds only appeased by Auletes handing over the property and gold once held by the supporters of the deceased Berenice. It was around that time that the poet Catullus landed in the city at the invitation of the King to serve a tutor to Prince Ptolemy the Younger, the poet being reported to have been fascinated by both Cleopatra and her sister Arsinoe.

“Oh Crassus, Oh Crassus”, Parthian anti-Crassus play proves popular


Among the moves taken by the Parthian Shah Orodes II to secure his rule against the threat of the Romans and the proconsul Crassus was a clever move to undermine the reputation of his rival, using the skill of the Parthian playwrights (with the help of players and comedians from abroad) to pen the scathing, irreverent and abusive “Oh Crassus, Oh Crassus”, a comedic play portraying the many shortcomings of the proconsul as to humiliate him before audiences. Backed as official propaganda by the court the play was presented across the largest cities and eventually the entire realm as well, drawing consistent laughter and amusement by Parthian crowds as the name of Crassus was turned into a laughingstock by many of them (including a mockery of Rome as well). Alas, the surprise was that “Oh Crassus, Oh Crassus” proved popular with audiences outside of Parthia as well. Arab and Jewish princes funded their own translated abridgements of the play (having an intense dislike of the proconsul) and having it debut under the noses of Roman rule. While its effect remains contained, the play has managed to undermine Crassus’s rule in Syria as well, with a memorable scene in which Crassus willingly cross-dresses to steal a bag of gold being the most requested to be repeated.
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« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2017, 01:10:58 AM »

Oh! Rome, Rome! I begged of you to demand that Pompeius pledges not to arrest any of us, and what has Pompeius done? He has spread the worst rumors about me, asserting me with money changers and foreigners. I stand apart from Egypt and Crassus, and are not the two most mortal enemies? The Pharaoh and the wealthy Romans are both rightly unpopular, as the one is a foreign King, though an ally of our Republic, and of the latter many have oppressed my friends, the freed-men and plebeians of Rome, as well as many patricians.

Furthermore, I wish all to know that the actions of consul Milo and the dictator Pompeius are most illegal. To the legionaries, I beg that none side against our great Republic. I will not call on you to turn against Pompey - that may come from an orator twice as good as me. That said, if my friends in Rome feel endangered, I urge them to flee to me. I urge the good Senators who remain to declare the attempt on my life illegal, as Roman law clearly dictates. To the former dictator Pompey and the former consul Milo, I say this: you have broken the laws of the Republic and the trust of the people. You have ordered the death of a Roman citizen without the consent of the Senate. I predicted you would try to arrest me, but not be so foolhardy as to try to execute me. Which of you is responsible? Or is it both?
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Lumine
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« Reply #17 on: December 23, 2017, 01:33:11 AM »

The Families:

The Sapaean Dynasty:

Head: Cotys I (79 BC), widowed
Issue:
1.   Rhescuporis (60 BC)
Important relatives:
1.   Rhoemetalces, his middle brother (64 BC)
2.     Rhescuporis, his youngest brother (62 BC)
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Lumine
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« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2017, 01:38:22 AM »

52 BC, Military and Strategic Situation:


Gaius Julius Caesar:
-Army of Gaul: 9 Legions, 54,000 strong.
-Auxiliary Forces: 10,000 strong (4,000 cavalry).
(Cannot recruit more men without approval from the Senate.)

Marcus Licinius Crassus:
-Army of Syria: 7 Legions, 42,000 strong.
-Auxiliary Forces: 8,000 strong (4,000 cavalry).
(Cannot recruit more men without approval from the Senate.)

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus:
-Armies in Italy: 3 Legions, 18,000 strong.
-Army of Lusitania: 3 Legions, 15,000 strong.
-Army of Hispania Ulterior: 3 Legions, 15,000 strong.
-Army of Hispania Citerior: 3 Legions, 15,000 strong.
(Cannot recruit more men without approval from the Senate.)

Orodes II of Parthia:
-Army of Surena: 23,000 strong (8,000 infantry, 15,000 cavalry)
-Army of Orodes: 27,000 srong (27,000 infantry)
(Can recruit 12,000 men this year)

Ptolemy XII of Egypt:
-Army of Egypt: 17,000 strong (16,000 infantry, 1,000 cavalry)
-Gabiniani Legionaries: 3,000 strong
(Can recruit 6,000 men this year)

Cotys I of Thrace:
-Army of Thrace: 12,000 strong (7,000 infantry, 5,000 cavalry)
(Can recruit 2,000 men this year)
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« Reply #19 on: December 23, 2017, 02:16:09 AM »

52 BC: Turn Two:


General View:

As the Clodian faction is almost exterminated on street fights, the separate rise of Pompey and Cato mirrors the complicated situation placed on Caesar and Clodius, both at a key disadvantage having lost their mandate (Caesar) or many of their supporters (Clodius). Tensions continue to rise in the East as Crassus's war against Parthia is delayed for a few months, and half of Gaul explodes in war as Celts, Aquitanians and Belgians rise in revolt against Rome. Rome is at the brink of a revolt...

Player Crisis:

Gaius Julius Caesar:
-Senate Popularity: 4/10
-Public Popularity: 6/10
-Wealth: Medium (and going down due to a lack of captured treasury)

Imperator,

-After the Senate managed to steamroll your supporters as little political resistance was offered your mandate as proconsul of Gaul has oficially expired, making you as of now a private citizen. Furthermore, your replacements as Governor Minucius Thermus (Thrace), Lepidus Paullus (Cisalpine Gaul) and C. Claudius Marcellus (Narbonese Gaul) have arrived in Narbo demanding the seven legions from your army that are legally theirs (3 for Marcellus, 2 for Paullus and 2 for Thermus). Legally barred from fighting the revolt of Ambiorix and Vercingetorix, will you obey the Senate and hand over your legions to the new governors?

-Due to the sudden end of your mandate you are required to present yourself in Rome to account for your term as Proconsul, and to demobilize your two remaining legions should you deliver the army to the Governors before crossing the Rubicon River. On the other hand, Rome remains heavily conflicted after the dictatorship of Pompeius, and both the destruction of the Clodians and the rise of Cato and the Optimates means your enemies could very well force you to stand trial unless the Triumvirs use their full influence in your favor. None of your offices speaks of it openly, but many are wondering what will become of them, and whether they'll be safe in Rome...

-Gaius Curio, the most prominent of the surviving Clodians left in Rome has written to you, asking for your support to save Clodius from the Senate. Floating the anger of the two Claudian governors in Asia and the remaining popularity of Clodius among many in the city Curio begs you to take Clodius and his family as refugees before they can be arrested or killed, although doing so would probably mean a permanent political break-up with Pompeius at a time in which you might need him the most. What will you do?

Marcus Licinius Crassus:
-Senate Popularity: 7/10
-Public Popularity: 3/10
-Wealth: Very High

Imperator,

-The past months of training have done wonders for your army's expertice and skill, although morale remains remarkably low due to the climate and the fear of invading a nation as inmense and dangerous as Parthia. On the other hand, as Cassius and Publius both point out, you only have three legal years left as proconsul of Syria, meaning time will soon start to run out to lead a successful war against the Parthian Empire. With Artavasdes's offer still standing (although he has upped the price of his collaboration), will you finally invade Parthia?

-As your representatives in the Senate note with urgency, Rome stands on the brink of civil war. While on a personal level you enjoy greater influence as your son's father-in-law Metellus Scipio is now consul (and friendly to you while remaining an Optimate), the escape of Clodius and the sudden end of Caesar's command open dangerous questions about the future of the Republic and whether someone will attempt to rise against the Senate for the first time since Catiline. Can you help restore the balance of power in Rome? Or will you take a different route?

-Your prestige in the East has been remarkably damaged by the "Oh Crassus" play, particularly in Judaea and Syria itself as the local population enjoys the clever jokes of the play at your expense. Will you attempt to counter this damage to your dignitas? If so, how?

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus:
-Senate Popularity: 2/10
-Public Popularity: 7/10
-Wealth: High

Imperator,

-Your dictatorship has left a divisive taste in Rome after the supression of many of your enemies, leading half the city to hail you as hero and the other half to consider you a dangerous tyrant. While no longer dictator, you nonetheless have the advantage of holding a close relationship to consul Milo, plus three legions that technically answer to you still in Italy. On the other hand, Cato's influence rises at the expense of yours, and the situation of Caesar and Clodius opens dangerous questions about the prospect of civil war.

-It seems your ties with Egypt have costed you a degree of popularity on account of your enemies's tactics, with the idea of a marriage between Gnaeus and Arsinoe being recieved very badly amongst the people and the Senate. Furthermore, due to the events that led Clodius to escape Prince Ptolemy was wounded and also forced to abandon the city, an insult the Egyptians might never forget (even if their King does). How will you handle your relationship to Egypt from now on?

-Consul Metellus Scipio has taken immediate advantage of the rise in support by the Optimates, arguing before the Senate (while stopping short of presenting a motion) that since you are no longer dictator, you are legally bound to hand over your three Italian legions to the consuls to remain within the bounds of the law. Furthermore, Metellus has dared you to cede the legions while arguing a failure to do so might be a confirmation of Cato's warnings against you desiring a crown. Will you cede the italian legions to the Senate?

Marcus Tullius Cicero:
-Senate Popularity: 7/10
-Public Popularity: 5/10
-Wealth: Very Low

Cicero,

-While you have struck many prospective links with prominent politicians, you still haven't recieved significant sources of income, and the work in your villas remains slow. Indeed, your administrator warns it could be years before they produce a decent source of income. Will you try to alleviate your financial problem once again?

-The escape of Clodius and the rise of Milo as consul aid your standing in a significant way, removing the most obvious threat of you being prosecuted. On the other hand, the situation inside Rome grows more and more tense as there is a serious risk of civil war breaking out, a war in which you would be bound to pick a side. How will you navigate these dangerous times?

-Rabirius, suspecting a change of heart in your position towards him, denounces angrily that you are among those excessively linked towards Egypt, and his banker friends are starting to take note. Will you attempt to mend bridges with Rabirius and by extension with the merchant class in Rome, or embrace a completely different new path?

Marcus Porcius Cato:
-Senate Popularity: 8/10
-Public Popularity: 4/10
-Wealth: Very Low

Cato,

-Congratulations, the Optimate faction has enjoyed from a significant resurgence thanks to your actions in the past few months, thus election your young protege Lucius Metellus as Aedile and your friend Metellus Scipio as consul, giving the factio a chance to expand its influence and relevance at a critical time. Yet the time has come for your own campaign as consul in what promises to be an extremely competitive race among five candidates. Can you obtain the ultimate victory and become consul?

-The end of Caesar's mandate in Gaul offers you a key opportunity to finally achieve his downfall from power as soon as he arrives in Rome, since as a private citizen he could finally be prosecuted. On the other hand, this very same threat causes immense tension between the Optimates and the supporters of Caesar and the popular cause, and might lead even to war should it spiral out of control. How do you plan to handle Caesar?

-On a smaller but not insignificant scale is the issue of Clodius, fled after his attempted arrest. Milo has proposed a motion to declare him a public enemy, but as he remains popular in Rome and in some places in Italy this could very well lead to a revolt, not to mention to potential problems with his brothers in Asia and Cilicia. How should the Optimates proceed regarding Clodius?
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« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2017, 02:37:52 AM »

Publius Clodius Pulcher:
-Senate Popularity: 1/10
-Public Popularity: 7/10
-Wealth: Very Low

Clodius,

-Fulvia, your children, some of your friends and Prince Ptolemy arrive in Etruria after narrowly avoiding arrest and perhaps dead. Etruria as a whole is one of the few regions in Italy which has a very favorable view of yourself and your cause, a potential zone of support in the complicated times to come. While Curio and your more moderate allies wonder if you should return to Rome and seek a negotiated solution, there is a real threat that the Senate declares you a public enemy. Will do you dare to take action against the Senate despite the inmense risk?

-In terms of allies, several options appear as pointed out by Fulvia. Caesar is bound to return to Italy after the end of his term, and his influence should not be underestimated. Your brothers rule Asia and Cilica, and while they are personally conservative they cannot sit idly by and watch you suffer the fate of Catiline or the Gracchi. And keeping Prince Ptolemy at your side means an interesting amount of leverage with Egypt, particularly after proudly declaring yourself a friend to the Kingdom. Which potential ally will you appeal to?

-While your gangs have been crushed, the animosity created through Pompeius's dictatorship offers a chance to exploit your support among the people to incite them to show their discontent towards the Senate. On the other hand, if not handled responsibly it could easily spiral into conflict within the city and significant loss of Roman life. Will you attempt to use your standing with the people to your advantage?

Orodes II:
-Popularity: 7/10
-Wealth: Very High

Great Shah,

-The propaganda efforts taken against Crassus have worked far better than expected, leading even people inside Roman rule to laugh at him and question his ability. This aids in the task of bringing the Parthian people together, although your rule could still be undone by military defeat against the very dangerous Roman army and due to civil strife due to the continued survival of the boy Mithridates. Can you continue to cement your rule despite the evident dangers?

-Envoys return from the East noting that there are marriage prospects to be found in Commagene, the Bosphoran Kingdom and Cappadocia, which significantly interests some in your family. On the other hand, your envoys have been very much undermined and humilliated by the effective diplomacy of Princess Cleopatra, to the effect in which these Kingdoms will actually place a marriage match with Egypt ahead of Parthia in terms of prorities. How will you respond to this?

-Messengers from the west bear interesting news, as it seems the Romans are facing further strife and division which might have an effect on Crassus and his army. While it would be unthinkable for a Roman senator to negotiate with Parthia unless an actual civil war was in place, there are those who believe Parthia could exploit Roman divisions to their advantage.

Ptolemy XII Auletes:
-Popularity: 2/10
-Wealth: Medium

Great King,

-Cleopatra returns from her Eastern tour in triumph, pointing out that Mithridates of Pergamon, the Bosphoran Kingdom, Commagene, Cappadocia and Armenia all offer marriage with the Ptolemaic Dynasty after being charmed by the Princess. On the downside, the mysterious death of Pothinus has increased the animosity of the people of Alexandria towards the Princess, and the tour may have given dangerous notions to Cleopatra about her own skill and importance. How will you handle your ambitious daughter?

-Tragedy strikes as Prince Ptolemy the Elder suffers an incredible humilliation in Rome, wounded and slightly deformed at the hands of an unknown Roman. The boy has been forced to flee into the Roman countryside behind Clodius and protected by Septimius and the surviving Gabiniani, in what is considered a huge blow for Egyptian prestige. Can you bring your son to safety? How should your relationship to Rome even be handled after such an event?

-While the delivery of gifts to the people in Alexandria appeased them for some time, the city stands on the bring of a revolt. The news of a marriage between the Royal House and the hated Romans was already a source of discord, made even worse by the attack on Prince Ptolemy and the death of Pothinus, which many blame on Princess Cleopatra. Crowds grow violent every day demanding you to take urgent action. But what will you do?

Cotys I:
-Popularity: 5/10
-Wealth: Low

King Cotys,

-You have managed to see your Kingdom survive thus far in your brief reign as Thrace faces a very dangerous strategic situation. To the north there's the growing might of the Dacian tribes and their Kingdom Burebista, who while busy conquering the Greek cities in the coastline is very much aware of Thrace as a potential target. To the south there is Rome, always a danger too on account of his military power and the risk of any ambitious governor following the example of Caesar and declaring war. Can you keep up this uneasy balance to the advantage of Thrace?

-For the past few years Thrace has been a client Kingdom of Rome, and one closely aligned to Pompeius through political ties. Many in the Kingdom certainly support staying close to a known military hero such as Pompeius to keep Thrace protected and safe, but there are those who wonder whether Thrace might not be better served by taking advantage of the current strife in Rome. Will you seek to change the terms of your relationship to Rome?
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« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2017, 02:52:20 AM »

Election Guide:


Overview: After Metellus Scipio and Titus Annius Milo ended up winning the consulship in a landslide, the elections for the magistratures in 51 BC are starting to heat up as the slate of candidates becomes clearer, with no less than five different candidates standing up for the consulship. So let us have a brief look at the candidates:

Patrician Candidates (1 to be elected):

S. Sulpicius Rufus (Moderate)
P. Servilius Vatia Isauricus (Pro-Caesar)

Plebebian Candidates (1 to be elected):

M. Claudius Marcellus (Pro-Pompeius / Optimate)
M. Porcius Cato the Younger (Optimate)
P. Vatinius (Pro-Caesar and Pro-Clodius)

As we can see, an exciting fight of several senatorial big beasts, which makes the road of Cato to the consulship more difficult than one might usually expect. In reaction to Pompeius's dictatorship and against the Optimates the team of Vatia Isauricus and Vatinus has risen to defend Caesar, Clodius and the Popular faction as a whole, having serious chances of victory in the polarized city. On the other side of the issue stand the more moderate Sulpicius Rufus and, of course, Marcellus and Cato, the last two seen as frontrunners for the plebeian consulship with Marcellus combining his conservatism with a pro-Pompeian streak as well. As to the tribunes, it should be noted the ten tribunes of the plebs of this year ended up as follows:

Tribunes of the Plebs:

Pro-Optimate: 3
Pro-Pompey: 2
Pro-Caesar: 2
Pro-Clodius: 1
Pro-Crassus: 1
Neutral: 1

As you can see, a much worse than expected performance by the pro-Pompeius forces, whereas the Optimates start to make noticeable inroads in the tribunes that will give them further legislative power in collaboration with consul Metellus Scipio. Milo was particularly hurt by this, as a deal with Pompeius prevented him from running his own slate of candidates and thus leaves him dependent on just two Pro-Pompeius tribunes. As to the next year and with Clodius's ambition to be Praetor likely ruined for years, it is nonetheless believed the pro-Caesar and pro-Clodius forces could make further gains should they run a concerted and competent campaign.
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DKrol
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« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2017, 04:21:31 PM »

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus
52 BC

A Speech to the People of Rome

I, G. Pompeius Magnus, have served my year as dictator of Rome. I declare to you that the city and the Republic are safer today than they were when I took office! Italy is safer, with our allies in the North sured up and our allies in the South secure from the scurge of piracy. Gang warfare no longer disrupts our lives and a man can walk across the city without fear of molestation. The mastermind behind those gangs - Clodius - has been forced to flee the city and our great Consul, Titus Annius Milo, has already taken steps to ensure that Clodius is held to account for his crimes against Rome.

I must admit to the people of Rome, in the most public and true manner possible, I have made a mistake. In an effort to secure a bride for my eldest son, I accepted an offer for marriage from the King of Egypt. I now know that that was a mistake and a misgiving to the people of Rome. It turns out that the Egyptian was using me and my son to build his own political network within Rome while he was, at the same time, making moves to align himself with Clodius! No father would desire for his eldest son married to a family who support the man responsible for so much pain and suffering in Rome? I have broken off the engagement between my son and the Egyptian and I truly ask the Roman people for forgiveness in that error.

I further hereby declare my support to P. Servilius Vatia Isauricus and M. Claudius Marcellus for the offices of Consul for the coming year. Both men have long histories of service to Rome and will continue the efforts I began as dictator, and which Titus Annius Milo has continued as Consul, to make our city safe once again. It is important that P. Servilius Vatia Isauricus, a Caesarian, and M. Claudius Marcellus, one of my own, stand together as Consuls, to reaffirm the support of the Republic for the relationship between Gaius Julius Caesar, Marcus Licinius Crassus, and myself. Without that relationship intact, I cannot assure to the Roman people the continued domestic peace and balance that we have strived to craft over the last several years.

Romans, the greatest days of Rome lie ahead!
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« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2018, 02:26:43 PM »

Marcus Tullius Cicero Addresses the Assembly

Romans, countrymen, gentlemen of the assembly, I rise today in support of Clodius Marcellus and his bid for the Consulship in the upcoming year. There is but one man who can unite the disparate and bickering factions which dominate Rome and save us from the increasingly bold and dangerous radicals, and that is Marcellus. Our Republic is at a crossroads. If we take the wrong path, we could very well see all of our prized Republican institutions collapse into anarchy and disarray. We must always safeguard vigilantly the Republic and its government which allowed us to become the dominant power in the world!
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Lumine
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« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2018, 06:23:34 PM »

Early 52 BC:

Utter chaos in Rome!

Aborted coup leaves Pompeius dead, Rome itself facing riots


The critical political situation in the aftermath of the past year had left many Romans concerned both with the potential for a civil war as well as the collapse in order in Italy and Rome. Pompeius's dictatorship had restored order at the cost of public resentment, and the decision of the Senate to follow Milo's wishes had seen Clodius declared a public enemy. In such a context and with fears of the situation exploding the situation appeared to cool down as Caesar travelled to Rome with a reasonable guard (and not an army), bolstering the belief that war could be avoided. Secretely arrangements had been made between Caesar and Clodius on one side, and Pompeius and Milo on the other, which would lead to Clodius's arranged arrest and a fair trial for him.

Alas, it was a ruse that would have a bloody end. Entering Caesar's residence to collect Clodius, Milo was ambushed and taken prisoner by Clodius's men, and threatened to sign a confession for conspiring to murder the popular tribune (with Milo proudly refused to sign). Disguising themselves as Milo's men and as the consul the conspirators pulled the same trap on Pompeius to arrest him as well, with the difference that Pompeius defended himself bravely and called on his guard. By the time both sides withdrew from the residence (set aflame by accident), Pompeius lay injured near a small bust of Caesar, and bled to death before a doctor could attend him. Clodius, in the meantime, was kidnapped along with his wife and family, leading his followers and his friends Antonius and Curio leaderless.

What was originally devised as the manifestation of Clodius's followers and former gangs to press the Senate into taking action against Pompeius and Milo evaporated with the disappearance of the tribune, the news of the death of Pompeius and the refusal of Milo to give in, and as the rumors grew larger the city exploded. The remaining gangs and pro-Clodius crowds rose and took the streets in a violent riot, all while the Senate collapsed in dissent due to loaded accussations from all sides. Caesar's men took their general out of Rome upon serious threats (many Senators denouncing Caesar as a would-be tyrant), and the former proconsul promptly boarded a ship to return to his army.

Ptolemy Auletes strikes!

Cyprus invaded, Clodius kidnapped, grain flow to Rome cut off


There were many who, in the aftermath of the disastrous events in Rome and the wounding of Prince Ptolemy expected Auletes to cave in to Rome, an act which could have easily led to a full-scale riot in Alexandria. They were wrong. Appeasing the crowds immediately by sending Cleopatra away and into Syria, Auletes bought enough time to take some unexpected and bold moves. Lucius Septimius and his surviving Gabiniani moved against Clodius in the middle of his political ploy, capturing the tribune, his wife Fulvia and several of his family members and friends (with the noteworthy exceptions of Antonius and Curio) and boarding a fast ship to Alexandria with the famous Roman in chains).

As these events took part in Rome Auletes had the goods and fortune of Roman traders in Egypt seized by the royal treasury (significantly expanding Auletes's wealth) while the key flow of grain was cut off, delivering a heavy blow to the Senate and the city. General Achillas invaded and conquered most of Cyprus, and Auletes was able to celebrate these moves as Septimus landed in Alexandria bringing the popular prince Ptolemy in triumph and a disgraced Clodius. Remembering well Clodius's role in overthrowing Auletes's brother in Cyprus and forcing him to suicide, the Alexandrian crowds cheered for their King and demanded the immediate torture and execution of the hated Roman.

A new Civil War

Caesar's troops revolt, Milo killed by gangs, Senate headless


Over the next few days to Pompeius's death, Caesar's escape and Clodius's kidnapping Rome lived days of fear and blood. The leaderless crowds and gangs dedicated themselves to sacking several parts of the city while fighting the urban cohorts in fierce street battles, several Senators being assassinated after daring to set out of their homes. Unable to gather in full to take action and forced to hide in many cases, the members of the Senate found it near impossible to restore control over the city, particularly once the consuls suffered misfortune themselves: Milo was tortured and executed by Clodius's angry followers, and the consul Metellus Scipio was wounded in a street fight. The Senate was for all purposes headless, many looking towards Cicero and Cato as the more important of the surviving senators.

The situation was to grow worse. Sent by the Senate to take command of the armies in Gaul and put down the enemy uprising, Pompeius the Younger suffered a mutiny in Narbo shortly after learning of his father's death. Caesar's legates and troops took their commander's side, and Pompeius was pushed back to Cisalpine Gaul with his smaller force and the loyalist units of Labienus. There he was joined by his brother Sextus and his pregnant stepmother Cornelia Postuma, at which point the countless clients of the late Pompeius in Picenum and Umbria swore loyalty to Pompeius the Younger, a move followed by the Pompeian Legates in Hispania and their large armies.

Caesar was in march to an army that was determined to defend him at all costs, Pompeius the Younger sat in Cisalpine Gaul as the uneasy heir to his father's legacy, the Senate was headless and threatened by riots, and Crassus, while embroiled in a war of his own, now had two new legions raised by the Senate in Brundisum, ready to play a role. A civil war had begun.
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