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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  Best 20th century president
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Author Topic: Best 20th century president  (Read 9085 times)
Colin
ColinW
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« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2004, 07:03:02 pm »

I'm not going to list them since it would take too long. More time than I have. So I think at the top of my list would be Ronald Reagan and Teddy Rooseavelt.
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12th Doctor
supersoulty
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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2004, 09:15:48 pm »


1st   Ronald Reagan
2nd   Teddy Roosevelt
3rd   Harry Truman
4th   John F. Kennedy
5th   Richard Nixon
6th   William McKinley
7th   George H. W. Bush
8th   Ike Eisenhower
9th   FDR
10th   William Taft
11th   Gerald Ford
12th   Herbert Hoover
13th   Calvin Coolidge
14th   Bill Clinton
15th   Woodrow Wilson
16th   LBJ
17th   Warren Harding
18th   Jimmy Carter
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giving birth to thunder
BRTD
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« Reply #27 on: October 22, 2004, 01:43:00 am »

ing an intern sure hurt the country more than the Great Depression.
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green
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« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2004, 02:06:49 am »

The best president by far is interestingly the one that wins every election regardless of the era, government regulations or the media. it's 
---------------- NO ONE -------------------
A direct democracy would and has worked better than any representational system.   It's makes sense that more than half the population stays home on election day in "freest nation in the world".
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12th Doctor
supersoulty
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« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2004, 10:54:02 am »

ing an intern sure hurt the country more than the Great Depression.

Ignoring the terrorist threat certainly hurt the world more than a tariff, if you want to go that route.
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12th Doctor
supersoulty
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« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2004, 10:55:47 am »

The best president by far is interestingly the one that wins every election regardless of the era, government regulations or the media. it's 
---------------- NO ONE -------------------
A direct democracy would and has worked better than any representational system.   It's makes sense that more than half the population stays home on election day in "freest nation in the world".

It is better than the 15% turn out that you have in France.
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ThePrezMex
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« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2004, 12:28:58 pm »

my ranking:

1) T. Roosevelt
2) Harry Truman
3) Ronald Reagan
4) FDR
5) LBJ
6) Bill Clinton
7) Dwight Eisenhower
Cool Richard Nixon
9) JFK
10) Gerald Ford
11) Woodrow Wilson
12) G.H.W. Bush
13) Herbert Hoover
14) Calvin Coolidge
15) William Mckinley
16) James Carter
17) William Taft
18) Warren Harding
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2004, 10:54:53 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon
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StatesRights
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« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2004, 01:46:01 am »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2004, 07:46:25 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2004, 07:49:38 pm »

I probably should have put Nixon higher and Carter lower. One's just so mean and the other so nice. I forget it shouldn't be aesthetic.
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StatesRights
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« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2004, 07:57:44 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2004, 08:19:26 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.

In another thread you said:

" But we sacrificed our 'great experiment' when Lincoln was inaugurated. He set a terrible precedent for how to govern and is easily the worst president in American history. "

I can see we don't see eye to eye on what constitutes civil rights progress or what constitutes a truly bold and visionary leader.

I'll give you that the congressional Republicans were generally pretty good about civil rights and many congressional Democrats in the South were not. But nonetheless Johnson was President in 1964, signed the Civil Rights legislation, and should get the credit in a ranking of Presidents. By your logic, it's fair for me to say George Bush opposed a Dept of Homeland Security and only signed it because of pressure from Democrats. Is that a point you'll give me???
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #38 on: October 23, 2004, 08:57:59 pm »

CNN transcript, Jack Valenti, a Republican, on Johnson and Civil Rights:
"PHILLIPS: Now, Jack, when all this was going on, you were very involved in politics. You were an aide to Lyndon Johnson. Tell us about the mind set of Lyndon Johnson and why he wanted to make civil rights a priority. And what he said to you and how you advised him as his aide.

VALENTI: Well, first, it's a great honor to be on this show with one of America's greatest heroes, John Lewis.

LEWIS: Jack, you've been very kind, jack. It's good to be with you, my friend.

VALENTI: Well, you're a great hero, John, and we're in your debt.

On the very night of Johnson's first night of his accession to the presidency, I flew back with him from Dallas, having been in that motorcade when President Kennedy was murdered, and in that photograph.

As he lay in bed, with Bill Moyers, Cliff Carter (ph) and I surrounding him, sitting around that big bed, I guess it might have been midnight on November the 22nd, '63, he brought up fact that the civil rights bill was languishing in the Senate, wasn't going anywhere, and that by damn he was going to get it out of there and pass it. And he was going to make it on the moral issue, the moral imperative, and force everybody to come to that line and cross it.

It was an extraordinary experience that this man determined that the first priority on his agenda was human justice and civil rights, and he made it all come true.

PHILLIPS: Well, Jack, Roy Wilkins, who was the head of the NAACP at that time, he said some pretty powerful things to you with regard to how he felt about Lyndon Johnson and what Johnson was doing for the black community.

VALENTI: That's right. We were in a meeting in the Cabinet Room, with all the great black leaders, Dorothy Hite, whom I saw yesterday, Phil Randolph, Bayard Rustin, Whitney Young, Clarence Mitchell and Roy Wilkins, of course, were the largest among them all. As we left the meeting, he put his arm around me, and he said, Jack, don't you realize that God moves in strange and wondrous ways?"

And I said, What do you mean, Roy?

He said, don't you find it odd the greatest friend the Negro in America has ever had turns out to be a southern president?

And I must say, I kind of misted up a little bit on that.

PHILLIPS: Congressman Lewis, you were telling me how JFK was so inspirational to you. I asked you that question, why did you decide to get into politics? And did you ever think you'd be in the position to change policy that really fought against you for so long? And then Lyndon Johnson, so tight with JFK -- it's interesting how this all came about.

LEWIS: Well, I was deeply, deeply inspired by President Kennedy. I watched the campaign of 1960. I could not even register to vote in Alabama. My own mother and father could not register to vote for President Kennedy. But he was elected.

And years later, I met him, in May of 1963 or June of 1963. And we developed a friendship. And later, when President Johnson became president, he invited me to the White House when he signed the Voting Rights Act of '65. And I will never forget that.

So all of these men, Robert Kennedy, President Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., just coming there to testify before a committee, or meet with the others...

PHILLIPS: And all those white men. I mean this was pretty shocking. LEWIS: It was all white men. But when I met with them and talked with them, you saw them moving, you saw them changing and growing. And I became convinced that they were convinced that it was the right thing to do to get this legislation passed.

PHILLIPS: Let's talk about that legislation.

Jack, you remember that day. Let's just bring us back to it, 40 years ago.

VALENTI: Well, the day of course was the climax of ceaseless, relentless persuasion on the part of Lyndon Johnson and all the people around him. I know that in the days leading up to the vote on the Civil Rights Act of '64, as later we did on the Voting Rights Act of '65, he told me, he said, now, here's some congressmen and senators I want you to talk to. They're southern congressmen and senators, but you talk like they do, so by God, you go up to that Hill and you get their vote.

And I would go in there and say, senator or congressman, President Johnson wants you to know that if you vote with him, he'll never forget. But if you vote against him, he'll always remember. We played -- we played it tough.

But he was determined that he was going to pass that bill which was so locked up deep in the bowels of the Senate, that it looked like it could never get out. But he got it out.

One other anecdote: I remember in December '63, a conversation he had with Senator Russell, and he told him he was going to pass that bill.

And Senator Russell said, Well, Mr. President, if you do, you'll not only lose this election, but you'll lose the south forever. I remember Lyndon Johnson saying in words I have never forgotten, he said, well, Dick if that's the price I have to pay, I will gladly pay it. "

He won the election, basically lost the South for the Dems forever, but for the worthiest cause of all- equality under the law.
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StatesRights
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« Reply #39 on: October 23, 2004, 09:31:45 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.

In another thread you said:

" But we sacrificed our 'great experiment' when Lincoln was inaugurated. He set a terrible precedent for how to govern and is easily the worst president in American history. "

I can see we don't see eye to eye on what constitutes civil rights progress or what constitutes a truly bold and visionary leader.

I'll give you that the congressional Republicans were generally pretty good about civil rights and many congressional Democrats in the South were not. But nonetheless Johnson was President in 1964, signed the Civil Rights legislation, and should get the credit in a ranking of Presidents. By your logic, it's fair for me to say George Bush opposed a Dept of Homeland Security and only signed it because of pressure from Democrats. Is that a point you'll give me???

Lincoln waged war on southern civilians and violated the constitution in regards to policies towards the south. If that does not make a bad president I don't know what does.
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #40 on: October 23, 2004, 09:44:33 pm »
« Edited: October 23, 2004, 09:50:58 pm by TCash101 »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.

In another thread you said:

" But we sacrificed our 'great experiment' when Lincoln was inaugurated. He set a terrible precedent for how to govern and is easily the worst president in American history. "

I can see we don't see eye to eye on what constitutes civil rights progress or what constitutes a truly bold and visionary leader.

I'll give you that the congressional Republicans were generally pretty good about civil rights and many congressional Democrats in the South were not. But nonetheless Johnson was President in 1964, signed the Civil Rights legislation, and should get the credit in a ranking of Presidents. By your logic, it's fair for me to say George Bush opposed a Dept of Homeland Security and only signed it because of pressure from Democrats. Is that a point you'll give me???

Lincoln waged war on southern civilians and violated the constitution in regards to policies towards the south. If that does not make a bad president I don't know what does.

South Carolina violated the Constitution when it seceded from the Union. Where in the Constitution do they get that power? They don't. Elected officials in the emerging "Confederacy" essentially waged a military occupation of states that belonged to the Union.

The very type of action you are decrying now is the only justifiable argument your President has for invading Iraq. "Freeing the Iraqi people from a brutal dictator." Lincoln freed the American slaves from a brutal ecopnomic system and the governments that supported it.

"Freedom is on the march" is the only decent line Bush had in the three debates. Although I don't really buy it, it's the only vision that could save Bush from the trash heaps of history. It really could be a Lincolnesque vision for the world if he doesn't muck it up. Geez, you've got me defending Bush now. Yuck!
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StatesRights
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Posts: 31,153
Political Matrix
E: 7.61, S: 0.00

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« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2004, 09:54:53 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.

In another thread you said:

" But we sacrificed our 'great experiment' when Lincoln was inaugurated. He set a terrible precedent for how to govern and is easily the worst president in American history. "

I can see we don't see eye to eye on what constitutes civil rights progress or what constitutes a truly bold and visionary leader.

I'll give you that the congressional Republicans were generally pretty good about civil rights and many congressional Democrats in the South were not. But nonetheless Johnson was President in 1964, signed the Civil Rights legislation, and should get the credit in a ranking of Presidents. By your logic, it's fair for me to say George Bush opposed a Dept of Homeland Security and only signed it because of pressure from Democrats. Is that a point you'll give me???

Lincoln waged war on southern civilians and violated the constitution in regards to policies towards the south. If that does not make a bad president I don't know what does.

South Carolina violated the Constitution when it seceded from the Union. Where in the Constitution do they get that power? They don't. Elected officials in the emerging "Confederacy" essentially waged a military occupation of states that belonged to the Union.

The very type of action you are decrying now is the only justifiable argument your President has for invading Iraq. "Freeing the Iraqi people from a brutal dictator." Lincoln freed the American slaves from a brutal ecopnomic system and the governments that supported it.

"Freedom is on the march" is the only decent line Bush had in the three debates. Although I don't really buy it, it's the only vision that could save Bush from the trash heaps of history. It really could be a Lincolnesque vision for the world if he doesn't muck it up. Geez, you've got me defending Bush now. Yuck!

Secession is a constitutional right.
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #42 on: October 23, 2004, 09:59:29 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.

In another thread you said:

" But we sacrificed our 'great experiment' when Lincoln was inaugurated. He set a terrible precedent for how to govern and is easily the worst president in American history. "

I can see we don't see eye to eye on what constitutes civil rights progress or what constitutes a truly bold and visionary leader.

I'll give you that the congressional Republicans were generally pretty good about civil rights and many congressional Democrats in the South were not. But nonetheless Johnson was President in 1964, signed the Civil Rights legislation, and should get the credit in a ranking of Presidents. By your logic, it's fair for me to say George Bush opposed a Dept of Homeland Security and only signed it because of pressure from Democrats. Is that a point you'll give me???

Lincoln waged war on southern civilians and violated the constitution in regards to policies towards the south. If that does not make a bad president I don't know what does.

South Carolina violated the Constitution when it seceded from the Union. Where in the Constitution do they get that power? They don't. Elected officials in the emerging "Confederacy" essentially waged a military occupation of states that belonged to the Union.

The very type of action you are decrying now is the only justifiable argument your President has for invading Iraq. "Freeing the Iraqi people from a brutal dictator." Lincoln freed the American slaves from a brutal ecopnomic system and the governments that supported it.

"Freedom is on the march" is the only decent line Bush had in the three debates. Although I don't really buy it, it's the only vision that could save Bush from the trash heaps of history. It really could be a Lincolnesque vision for the world if he doesn't muck it up. Geez, you've got me defending Bush now. Yuck!

Secession is a constitutional right.

Article and section, please.
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StatesRights
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« Reply #43 on: October 23, 2004, 10:07:49 pm »

1st Theodore Roosevelt
2nd Lyndon B. Johnson
3rd Franklin D. Roosevelt
4th Harry S Truman
5th John F. Kennedy
6th Woodrow Wilson
7th Bill Clinton
8th Jimmy Carter
9th Dwight Eisenhower
10th Gerald Ford
11th George H. W. Bush
12th Ronald Reagan
13th Calvin Coolidge
14th Herbert Hoover
15th William McKinley
16th William Taft
17th Warren G. Harding
18th Richard Nixon


The man who got us deeply involved in Vietnam is #2?

The man who said (essentially) screw what the South thinks, black people have rights is #2!

The only reason LBJ even signed the Civil Rights act is because Republicans in congress passed it and it basically forced LBJ to sign in because of his re-election. I doubt an old time southern democrat racist like LBJ would have came up with such an idea on his own. Since Democrats have never tried to push for civil rights. Republicans did all the work for equality from 1867 - Present. Democrats are the ones that lie and make up bogus stories to pander to blacks. Like the newest ad that's being played on a local R&B station, "If George Bush is re-elected he will take away civil rights". Then at the end, "I'm John Kerry and I approve of this message." I hope one day the black community can wake up and realize that the Democrats are still the party of racial oppression but they've just changed their mode of operations.

In another thread you said:

" But we sacrificed our 'great experiment' when Lincoln was inaugurated. He set a terrible precedent for how to govern and is easily the worst president in American history. "

I can see we don't see eye to eye on what constitutes civil rights progress or what constitutes a truly bold and visionary leader.

I'll give you that the congressional Republicans were generally pretty good about civil rights and many congressional Democrats in the South were not. But nonetheless Johnson was President in 1964, signed the Civil Rights legislation, and should get the credit in a ranking of Presidents. By your logic, it's fair for me to say George Bush opposed a Dept of Homeland Security and only signed it because of pressure from Democrats. Is that a point you'll give me???

Lincoln waged war on southern civilians and violated the constitution in regards to policies towards the south. If that does not make a bad president I don't know what does.

South Carolina violated the Constitution when it seceded from the Union. Where in the Constitution do they get that power? They don't. Elected officials in the emerging "Confederacy" essentially waged a military occupation of states that belonged to the Union.

The very type of action you are decrying now is the only justifiable argument your President has for invading Iraq. "Freeing the Iraqi people from a brutal dictator." Lincoln freed the American slaves from a brutal ecopnomic system and the governments that supported it.

"Freedom is on the march" is the only decent line Bush had in the three debates. Although I don't really buy it, it's the only vision that could save Bush from the trash heaps of history. It really could be a Lincolnesque vision for the world if he doesn't muck it up. Geez, you've got me defending Bush now. Yuck!

Secession is a constitutional right.

Article and section, please.



Amendment 10.
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #44 on: October 23, 2004, 10:17:05 pm »

Article IV, section 2 "The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territories or other property belonging to the United States"
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TomC
TCash101
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« Reply #45 on: October 23, 2004, 10:25:49 pm »

Funny that "South Carolina Declaration of Causes of Secession" doesn't invoke the Tenth Amendment.

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Prospero
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« Reply #46 on: October 25, 2004, 02:14:57 pm »

My priorities are peace and prosperity.  No one keeps track of wars not fought.

1. Reagan
2. Coolidge
3. Eisenhower
4. Kennedy

Not sure beyond that.
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warady
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« Reply #47 on: November 03, 2004, 07:37:51 pm »

Reagan
Nixon
FDR
Truman
Bush I
Bush II
Ike

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Everett
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« Reply #48 on: November 03, 2004, 08:33:10 pm »

All of the presidents have had their annoying issues. I can't say I like any of them specifically, but if I had to choose one, it would probably be Theodore Roosevelt.
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erich
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« Reply #49 on: November 05, 2004, 01:11:15 am »

1. FDR
2. JFK
3. Harry Truman
4. Woodrow Wilson
5. Ike Eisenhower
6. Theodore Roosevelt
7. Bill Clinton
8. Gerald R. Ford
9. Lyndon Johnson
10. Jimmy Carter
11. Richard Nixon
12. Ronald Reagan
13. William Howard Taft
14. George H.W. Bush
15. Herbert Hoover
16. Calvin Cooligde
17. Warren G. Harding
18. George W. Bush
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