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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  North Dakota 1892
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Author Topic: North Dakota 1892  (Read 8685 times)
tweed
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« on: February 08, 2004, 11:01:02 am »

I don't understand what happened in North Dakota in 1892.  Itt says Weaver was the populist, Harris was the Republican, and Cleveland was on the 'fusion ticket.'  Weaver took 49% and won the state to Harris' 48.5%, yet Harris, Weaver, and Cleveland (who had no voted in ND) each got one EV.  What happened?
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Harry
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2004, 11:14:46 am »

I don't know for sure, but I guess the electors just voted that way.
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Gustaf
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2004, 12:54:52 pm »

I don't know for sure, but I guess the electors just voted that way.

That does seem likely... Wink
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tweed
Miamiu1027
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2004, 02:39:17 pm »

I know, but what is the 'Fusion' Party?
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Gustaf
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2004, 02:44:25 pm »

I know, but what is the 'Fusion' Party?

Isn't that what Kevin Lamoreau called the Superman party in the Superman v Lincoln what-if?
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tweed
Miamiu1027
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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2004, 02:53:37 pm »

Isn't that what Kevin Lamoreau called the Superman party in the Superman v Lincoln what-if?
I don't know.
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Gustaf
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2004, 02:54:58 pm »

Isn't that what Kevin Lamoreau called the Superman party in the Superman v Lincoln what-if?
I don't know.

Well, check it out, I'm fairly sure.
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tweed
Miamiu1027
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« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2004, 07:28:46 pm »

Isn't that what Kevin Lamoreau called the Superman party in the Superman v Lincoln what-if?
I don't know.

Well, check it out, I'm fairly sure.
Yeah, you're right, he did.
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Gustaf
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2004, 10:07:40 am »

Isn't that what Kevin Lamoreau called the Superman party in the Superman v Lincoln what-if?
I don't know.

Well, check it out, I'm fairly sure.
Yeah, you're right, he did.

That's kind of cool, huh?
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muon2
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« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2004, 03:51:47 pm »

Agrarian and farmer's parties were a powerful political force in the states of the upper midwest during the late 1800's. These populist parties often banded (fused) with one of the two national parties to get the majority in an election.

One fusion remnant still actively survives to the present. In Minnesota the Farmer-Labor Party merged with the Democrats. The party label there today still says DFL.
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tweed
Miamiu1027
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« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2004, 04:28:58 pm »

Agrarian and farmer's parties were a powerful political force in the states of the upper midwest during the late 1800's. These populist parties often banded (fused) with one of the two national parties to get the majority in an election.

One fusion remnant still actively survives to the present. In Minnesota the Farmer-Labor Party merged with the Democrats. The party label there today still says DFL.
thanks...but they would have won a majority even without Cleveleand.  Oh well.
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Nym90
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« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2004, 05:44:46 pm »

Well, from the North Dakota page itself...

"Two electors from the Democratic-Populist Fusion ticket won and one Republican Elector won. This created a split delegation of electors: one for Weaver, one for Harrison, and one for Cleveland."

In other words, North Dakota, as did many other states at that time, allowed voters to vote for each elector seperately. Voters could cast up to 3 votes for electors, and there were 6 choices on the ballot: 3 Democratic-Populist electors (either 2 Democrats and one Populist or 2 Populists and one Democrat) and 3 Republican electors. The 3 electors who got the most votes were the Electors who were chosen. The names of the electors were printed on the ballot as well as which candidate they supported. In this case, the 3 electors who won were one for each party.
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Gustaf
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« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2004, 06:20:27 pm »

Well, from the North Dakota page itself...

"Two electors from the Democratic-Populist Fusion ticket won and one Republican Elector won. This created a split delegation of electors: one for Weaver, one for Harrison, and one for Cleveland."

In other words, North Dakota, as did many other states at that time, allowed voters to vote for each elector seperately. Voters could cast up to 3 votes for electors, and there were 6 choices on the ballot: 3 Democratic-Populist electors (either 2 Democrats and one Populist or 2 Populists and one Democrat) and 3 Republican electors. The 3 electors who got the most votes were the Electors who were chosen. The names of the electors were printed on the ballot as well as which candidate they supported. In this case, the 3 electors who won were one for each party.

Well, that settles that I guess. Smiley Thanks Nym90! Smiley
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tweed
Miamiu1027
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« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2004, 07:24:06 pm »

Well, from the North Dakota page itself...

"Two electors from the Democratic-Populist Fusion ticket won and one Republican Elector won. This created a split delegation of electors: one for Weaver, one for Harrison, and one for Cleveland."

In other words, North Dakota, as did many other states at that time, allowed voters to vote for each elector seperately. Voters could cast up to 3 votes for electors, and there were 6 choices on the ballot: 3 Democratic-Populist electors (either 2 Democrats and one Populist or 2 Populists and one Democrat) and 3 Republican electors. The 3 electors who got the most votes were the Electors who were chosen. The names of the electors were printed on the ballot as well as which candidate they supported. In this case, the 3 electors who won were one for each party.
Okay, thanks, I think I understand it now.
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Kevinstat
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« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2004, 10:32:15 pm »

I guess my legacy lives on.  I haven't been nearly as active in posting lately (I'd like to say it was because I was too busy, but I really spend just as much time on the internet as I used to; I've just gotten lazy and don't make many posts).

In think it's nice that a small state like North Dakota has an interesting electoral fact like that to hold onto.  North Dakota was not the first state to give three Presidential candidates electoral votes (Maryland did in 1812, and other states may have as well), but it is the only state to split its electoral votes evenly among three candidates.

Sincerely,

Kevin Lamoreau
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Gustaf
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« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2004, 07:20:31 am »

I guess my legacy lives on.  I haven't been nearly as active in posting lately (I'd like to say it was because I was too busy, but I really spend just as much time on the internet as I used to; I've just gotten lazy and don't make many posts).

In think it's nice that a small state like North Dakota has an interesting electoral fact like that to hold onto.  North Dakota was not the first state to give three Presidential candidates electoral votes (Maryland did in 1812, and other states may have as well), but it is the only state to split its electoral votes evenly among three candidates.

Sincerely,

Kevin Lamoreau

Yes, it sure does! Smiley You should give attention to this forum, t's the best one around... Wink
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tweed
Miamiu1027
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« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2004, 09:15:50 am »

Even when Kevin was more active at the old forum, he ususally only posted at the history board.

Nice to see you back Kevin Smiley
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