Can US Attorney nominations be vetoed by home state senators via blue slips?
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  Can US Attorney nominations be vetoed by home state senators via blue slips?
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Author Topic: Can US Attorney nominations be vetoed by home state senators via blue slips?  (Read 1166 times)
David Hume
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« on: June 08, 2024, 09:12:43 PM »

In the Senate, a blue slip is a slip on which the senators from the state of residence of a federal judicial nominee give an opinion on the nominee.

The Long-standing tradition of the Senate is that district court judges can be vetoed. If home state senators did not returned blue slips, the nomination would not be further processed, and thus dead in committee.

US Attorneys are also reviewed by the judicial committee. Are they considered as judicial nominees subject to blue slips? If not, how much say does home state senator have? They are less partisan than district judges, so I guess home state senators would have heavier sways.
 
Could Coons veto David_C._Weiss's nomination in 2017 if he wanted?

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brucejoel99
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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2024, 09:40:22 PM »

Yes, the Senate's blue-slip process applies to U.S. Attorney nominees just as it continues to apply to district-court (& once applied to appellate) nominees, so that means that the home-state Senators must agree to consider a nominee to one of their local federal judgeship, U.S. Attorney or U.S. Marshal roles before the Senate Judiciary Committee can consider them.
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David Hume
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« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2024, 05:05:41 AM »

Yes, the Senate's blue-slip process applies to U.S. Attorney nominees just as it continues to apply to district-court (& once applied to appellate) nominees, so that means that the home-state Senators must agree to consider a nominee to one of their local federal judgeship, U.S. Attorney or U.S. Marshal roles before the Senate Judiciary Committee can consider them.

Do you know any source about this? I tried to search but all I found is about judges.
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brucejoel99
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« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2024, 09:09:57 AM »

Yes, the Senate's blue-slip process applies to U.S. Attorney nominees just as it continues to apply to district-court (& once applied to appellate) nominees, so that means that the home-state Senators must agree to consider a nominee to one of their local federal judgeship, U.S. Attorney or U.S. Marshal roles before the Senate Judiciary Committee can consider them.

Do you know any source about this? I tried to search but all I found is about judges.

Here's the CRS:

The blue-slip process for U.S. circuit and district court nominations refers to a practice by the Senate Judiciary Committee for use in the confirmation of federal judges and other positions. (These other positions are U.S. attorney and U.S. marshal positions, which are not addressed by this report.)
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