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  Talk Elections
  General Politics
  Political Geography & Demographics (Moderator: muon2)
  The only important one of these-Ohio/Region
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Author Topic: The only important one of these-Ohio/Region  (Read 2655 times)
Platypus
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« on: July 18, 2004, 12:10:38 am »

I'm tepted to go for 8; but I think it's 7. No republican has EVER won the presidency without winning Ohio.

There also seems to be three areas-northwestern Ohio, which is similar to the Northeast and Midatlantic area; the northwest which is similar to the midwest and rust belt area, and the south, which is similar to the 'new south' and bible-belt area. And then there is the state capital, which is a fusion of the three.

I beliee it is micromerica, so I'm going with 7. There ain't no Hawaii in Ohio.
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Lunar
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« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2004, 12:22:47 am »
« Edited: July 18, 2004, 12:23:11 am by Lunar »

Midwest, but Rustbelt works equally as well.

I googled Midwest for images and found about 50 different maps of the Midwest including and not including many different states, but they all included Ohio.

Sure, part of the state doesn't follow the traditional Midwest theme, but neither do parts of Michigan or Iowa.  Parts of New York don't follow the New England theme, but that doesn't stop New York from belonging there or deserving a "multi-society" status or whatever.
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KEmperor
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« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2004, 12:47:38 am »

Midwest, but Rustbelt works equally as well.

I googled Midwest for images and found about 50 different maps of the Midwest including and not including many different states, but they all included Ohio.

Sure, part of the state doesn't follow the traditional Midwest theme, but neither do parts of Michigan or Iowa.  Parts of New York don't follow the New England theme, but that doesn't stop New York from belonging there or deserving a "multi-society" status or whatever.

New York isn't part of New England....
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12th Doctor
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« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2004, 02:16:01 am »

It's three states in one, like PA.
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TeePee4Prez
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« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2004, 02:38:06 am »


I'm starting to think you want PA considered a Southern State.  Really the only part that comes close would be south of the PA Turnpike between the Chester Co. line and where I-70/76 break off.
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Lunar
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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2004, 02:43:59 am »

Midwest, but Rustbelt works equally as well.

I googled Midwest for images and found about 50 different maps of the Midwest including and not including many different states, but they all included Ohio.

Sure, part of the state doesn't follow the traditional Midwest theme, but neither do parts of Michigan or Iowa.  Parts of New York don't follow the New England theme, but that doesn't stop New York from belonging there or deserving a "multi-society" status or whatever.

New York isn't part of New England....

Yes, my mistake.  Just apply the same logic where ever you want though.
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12th Doctor
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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2004, 02:50:33 am »


I'm starting to think you want PA considered a Southern State.  Really the only part that comes close would be south of the PA Turnpike between the Chester Co. line and where I-70/76 break off.

Not so at all.  Pittsburgh isn't much different from Nashville or Charlotte, it really isn't.  The whole "T" is basically "Dixie North".  Northwest PA is very midwestern.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2004, 04:03:23 am »

North East: Rustbelt
Ohio Valley: Appalachia
Non NE Cities: Midwest
Rest: Cornbelt
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
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« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2004, 09:52:08 am »

It's a midwestern state with northeastern and southern (namely Appalachian) influences. The rustbelt isn't really a region.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2004, 09:57:01 am »

It's a midwestern state with northeastern and southern (namely Appalachian) influences. The rustbelt isn't really a region.

Yes and no... certainly it isn't a belt. Or maybe there are multiple rustbelts.
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acsenray
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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2004, 08:49:55 am »

Ohio has at least _four_ regions, not three.

1. There's the northeast, running from Youngstown to Toledo, which is a manufacturing and shipping belt that forms part of the continuum from Pittsburgh to Detroit. This area is part of the old labour movement.

2. There's the southwest, which is part of Appalachia. This is where all the coal came from to feed the mills of the northeast. The principal cities are Chillicothe, Portsmouth, and Athens (a college town).

3. There's central and west-central Ohio, which is a diverse combination of manufacturing, agriculture, high technology, some finance, the arms industry,  entrepreneurship, and inventing. This area's principle cities are Columbus and Dayton. You could call this area the "midwestern" part of Ohio, but it's much more diverse than places like Iowa and Nebraska.

4. Cincinnati. This city and its nether regions are separate from the "midwestern" part of Ohio. It's much, much more conservative than the rest of the state. Furthermore, it was once a center of the meat-packing industry, which was not really such a big influence in the rest of the state.
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muon2
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« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2004, 11:38:28 am »

It's a midwestern state with northeastern and southern (namely Appalachian) influences. The rustbelt isn't really a region.

Yes and no... certainly it isn't a belt. Or maybe there are multiple rustbelts.
I agree with using the "Rust Belt" as a region. It works much better than the Midwest as a description. The Midwest can span from the Great Lakes to the Great  Plains and doesn't capture the social and life style differences as one goes from Columbus, OH to Lincoln, NE and Lansing, MI to Topeka, KS.

As a native of the Midwest, and past resident of many of its states, I like Garreau's separation into two regions. The "Foundry" captures the sense of the Rust Belt from Chicago to Pittsburgh. The "Breadbasket" takes in the Plains from west of Chicago to the Front Range of the Rockies.

The question is OH, which I think is in the Rust Belt region, but is split into three states culturally. The Lake Erie shore is akin to Detroit. The eastern part with Akron and Youngstown is akin to western PA. They are both classic Rust Belt areas. The southern part from Columbus to Dayton and Cincinnati is a border state. The  area is best descibed as a conservative version of the Rust Belt and much like central IN including Indianapolis.
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