Best and worst arguments for the existence of God (user search)
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November 28, 2022, 09:04:45 AM
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  Best and worst arguments for the existence of God (search mode)
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Author Topic: Best and worst arguments for the existence of God  (Read 4404 times)
Alcibiades
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« on: July 16, 2022, 05:49:28 AM »

The strongest argument for a god is that the idea that the material universe would come into existence without an external cause violates every known law of said universe. The problem for most theists is that itís a long way from this argument to belief in a specific revealed creed.

Iíve never found this notably more convincing than any of the others. By the same logic, God ought to have had a creator, and his creator a creator, and that creator a creator, and so on and so on forever. If youíre going to refuse to accept this infinite regression, why can only God be the prime mover, and not, say, the Big Bang?
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Alcibiades
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Posts: 3,484
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2022, 10:56:26 AM »
« Edited: August 08, 2022, 11:01:18 AM by America Needs Dionysus »

Is there a name that people in the world of philosophy have for this argument? If there's any body of work on it I'm interested in reading more.

I'm not aware of it having a specific name, but I have no doubt that many have written on it in some form or other. Personally, I got to it through the problem of other minds (which I really think is one of the most important questions in philosophy). So you might call it "reductio ad solipsismum" if you're feeling fancy.

Eh, I’m not sure this is really true. Now it is certainly a foundational question, and has to be dealt with before you can really go on to investigate any other question in epistemology or metaphysics — hence why in many introductory philosophical texts, the problem of other minds and related questions over whether matter exists at all are contained in one of the very first chapters — but ultimately solipsism is a pretty fringe position among philosophers. The problem of other minds is not a very lively debate, because almost all philosophers believe that other minds and an external world do exist.
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