How did Native Americans vote?
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October 15, 2021, 11:57:25 PM

  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  2020 U.S. Presidential Election (Moderators: Likely Voter, TJ in Oregon, YE)
  How did Native Americans vote?
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Author Topic: How did Native Americans vote?  (Read 287 times)
GregTheGreat657
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« on: October 06, 2021, 04:09:10 PM »

I'd guess for Biden, but I don't know the margin, but I'd guess it was quite large given how mostly Native American counties voted, but I can't say anything for sure, because I haven't seen any exact figures
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CentristRepublican
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2021, 03:18:50 PM »

Very pro-Biden. See Native American counties in SD; Northeast AZ; Menominee, WI; and Northern NM for particulars. Oglala Lakota in SD, for instance, was one of Biden's strongest counties nationally and gave him nearly 90% of the vote. On the other hand, it's interesting that some Native American counties went heavily Republican, so it might depend on the region. For example, Eastern OK has dozens of plurality-Native American counties (no majority-Native American counties, interestingly) that supported Trump by landslide margins, and San Juan County in Southeast UT is also majority (56%) Native American but backed Trump by a decent enough 6 point margin.
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Roll Roons
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2021, 03:21:41 PM »

On the other hand, it's interesting that some Native American counties went heavily Republican, so it might depend on the region. For example, Eastern OK has dozens of plurality-Native American counties (no majority-Native American counties, interestingly) that supported Trump by landslide margins, and San Juan County in Southeast UT is also majority (56%) Native American but backed Trump by a decent enough 6 point margin.

The Lumbee in North Carolina, a traditionally Democratic constituency, also swung pretty hard towards Trump.
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Old School Democrat
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2021, 04:05:03 PM »

I think Native Americans are more likely to vote against their state government due to oppression and lack of recognition/racism. Southern/Western Natives are more likely to be Democratic while Midwestern/Northeastern are more likely to vote Republican for similar reasons, which can explain why the Natives of The Dakotas are powerfully Democratic, while the Native areas of Oklahoma are a lot closer than the white areas. NC is an interesting contradiction to my claims though, as Trump increased on this group without NC flipping, but he did federally recognize the Lumbee tribe (well Obama did but Trump took credit). That area of NC is also socially conservative (Robeson county is only 1 of 2 NC counties to allow corporal punishment to be used in school) so it's probably more complicated than a political party being in power.
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NOVA Green
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2021, 07:01:05 PM »

In addition to all of the comments upthread, it should also be noted that HRC performed extremely poorly in the 2016 GE among the Sovereign First Nations compared to historical performance for DEMs.

Much of that was driven by her perceived support for the Oil Pipeline projects.

This was manifested in significantly lower NA turnout, increased support for NAs for 3rd Party Candidates, etc...

In most of "Indian Country" there were significant DEM swings between '16 and '20, with a few notable exceptions posted by others.

One area where it can get murky when it comes to the Native American vote is the fact that indigenous native populations within the current territorial boundaries of the US have been systematically impacted by not only the original genocide, but later on by intermarriages with non-native populations, so identity becomes a lot more complex for example looking at the Cherokee Nation and overlaps with both African-American populations and Anglo-American populations.

There are also some similar patterns perhaps if we look at the Southwest, in particular the Pueblos of New Mexico, where there is a long an historical pattern of both Native and Spanish cultures blending.

One thing that gets tricky even if we were to just look at precinct results from Native American "Reservations", is that in many cases there are a significant % of non-native populations who live and own property on Native Land.

It gets even more complicated trying to look at Native Populations "Off Rez", since the population is so diluted that we don't really have anything, like might have been the case 50 years ago of precincts in Minneapolis, MN or places in South Dakota etc.... where we could try to assess partisan support on the basis of actual election data vs supposition.
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PSOL
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« Reply #5 on: Today at 09:15:23 PM »

An important factor here is that the Green Party vote, usually strong in native reservations, plummeted  in 2020.
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