2004 Euro Elections maps (U.K)
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« on: September 02, 2006, 04:53:07 PM »

The Key (which shall be used on all the maps for all the parties)...



And the first actual map... UKIP (who finished third; ahead of the LibDems).



As a general guide to anti-E.U sentiment in the U.K, this map isn't a bad guide, although do be warned that an anti-E.U Indie polled well in Sunderland.
Also note the fact that UKIP served as something of a BNP-lite party for a lot of middle class voters in this election.
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Harry Hayfield
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2006, 05:17:26 PM »

I've got a map somewhere showing how each council area in England and Wales (trust those Scots to use constituencies) and there was one thing I noticed. The UKIP strongholds were Lincolnshire and Devon and Cornwall. Is there a reason why UKIP do so well in those areas?
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2006, 05:57:54 PM »

I've got a map somewhere showing how each council area in England and Wales (trust those Scots to use constituencies) and there was one thing I noticed. The UKIP strongholds were Lincolnshire and Devon and Cornwall. Is there a reason why UKIP do so well in those areas?
 

The West Country has been a hotbed of anti-E.U sentiment for a few decades now... interestingly enough, quite a lot of people who vote UKIP in Euro elections there, vote LibDem at Westminster level. In other words, it's also a hotbed of protest voting.
I seem to recall that Lincolnshire gave an unusually low (for England) "yes" vote in the early '70's (although I could be wrong). The high UKIP vote there could also be a reaction to the beginnings of Eastern European immigration (Holland (ie; Boston and South Holland districts) has seen one of the largest influxes in the country).
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2006, 06:54:29 PM »

The Greens now:



In general the pattern I'd been expecting (although Mole Valley was a suprise). In several rural districts they polled just under 10%, but these usually border districts where they topped 10% (example; South Shropshire and Malverns were both around about 8%, and both border Herefordshire).
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afleitch
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2006, 07:04:16 PM »

Their high support in Edinburgh, as a whole and Glasgow, close to the university hub in the west end looks promising for next year and is pretty much where I expected their support to be concentrated.

Wales looks rather barren for them. Any reason why?
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2006, 07:40:10 PM »

Their high support in Edinburgh, as a whole and Glasgow, close to the university hub in the west end looks promising for next year and is pretty much where I expected their support to be concentrated.

Agree; I think their best constituency in 2004 was actually North & Leith, rather than Central (which did suprise me a little).

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Wales as a whole is not very socially liberal and it's current economic setup (and economic history) are not things generally associated with large green votes... and in the one area where they could have done well (Ceredigion) they doomed themselves for all eternity by endorsing the Plaid candidate back in the 1992 General Election.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2006, 07:48:20 PM »

BNP now:



Nothing suprising here (although had they polled a few more votes in Blaby, there would have been) o/c. What's interesting, is the way that this map reflects current (in 2004) areas of BNP activity; since 2004 they've (on the whole) fallen back in the old textile areas (as memories of the riots of a few years earlier start to fade, basically), while boomed (and then some) in certain London suburbs.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2006, 07:59:48 PM »
« Edited: September 03, 2006, 06:46:04 AM by Al ydw i »

Respect:

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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2006, 06:47:21 AM »

SNP and Plaid Cymru now:



Plaid map is as expected, not so sure about the SNP map. Glasgow Govan is lower than I'd thought it'd be, ditto Ochil.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2006, 09:34:48 AM »

LibDems:



The overall pattern isn't at all suprising, although the results in a couple of areas are odd.
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afleitch
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« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2006, 09:45:24 AM »

It's interesting to see that one year after the Holyrood elections, the SNP still poll strongly in Cumbernauld and Kilsyth. Several years down the line, it would appear that the SNP are trying to push forward with their 'new town' strategy; trying to win in the 'new' towns such as Cumbernauld (Cumbernauld and Kilsyth), East Kilbride, Livingston and Glenrothes (Fife Central) The exception being Irvine (Cunninghame South) which is solidly Labour.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2006, 11:57:02 AM »

Tories now:

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Junior Chimp
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« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2006, 01:04:25 PM »

How many seats does each nation get in the Parliament?
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Јas
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« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2006, 02:23:28 PM »

How many seats does each nation get in the Parliament?

Germany 99   
France 78   
Italy 78   
United Kingdom 78   
Spain 54   
Poland 54   
Netherlands 27   
Belgium 24   
Czech Republic 24   
Greece 24   
Hungary 24   
Portugal 24   
Sweden 19   
Austria 18   
Denmark 14
Finland 14
Slovakia 14
Ireland 13
Lithuania 13
Latvia 9
Slovenia 7
Cyprus 6
Estonia 6
Luxembourg 6
Malta 5
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2006, 04:40:24 PM »

And the final map; Labour...



Generally the sort of pattern you'd expect for that year. That Powys has a lot of tactical voting going on during General Elections becomes very obvious from that map, btw.
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Harry Hayfield
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« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2006, 04:48:39 AM »

For the next elections in 2009, we have a slight complication. According to the Nice treaty (which allows for the accession of Bulgaria and Romania), the number of UK MEP's will fall from 78 to 72 (as in 2004 when the number of MEP's fell from 84 to 78).

If the trend for reductions are the same as in 2004, then the likely casulaties will be as follows:

Definite Losses
East Midlands: Lose one to five MEP's. Lib Dem lose 1
South West: Lose one to six MEP's. Con lose 1

Proable Losses:
North West: Lose one to nine MEP's. Lib Dem lose 1
South East: Lose one to nine MEP's. Lib Dem lose 1
London: Lose one to eight MEP's. Lab lose 1
Scotland: Lose one to six MEP's. Con lose 1

Effect of Changes on UK MEP's:
Con 25 (-2)
Lab 18 (-1)
LDm 9 (-3)
Others 20 (n/c) (made up of UKIP 12, SNP 2, Green 2, PC 1, NI 3)
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2006, 09:57:05 AM »

Another Greenie map, this time with more whatsit things...

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