Theists only: Do you ever fast/follow religious dietary restrictions?
       |           

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 21, 2021, 03:37:24 PM

  Talk Elections
  General Discussion
  Religion & Philosophy (Moderators: Gustaf, TJ in Oregon)
  Theists only: Do you ever fast/follow religious dietary restrictions?
« previous next »
Pages: [1]
Poll
Question: ...
#1
Yes
 
#2
No
 
#3
Not a theist
 
Show Pie Chart
Partisan results

Total Voters: 34

Author Topic: Theists only: Do you ever fast/follow religious dietary restrictions?  (Read 928 times)
Scott🦋
Scott
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 35,830
Norway


Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -7.48

P P P

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: March 30, 2018, 04:38:28 PM »

No.  Even though all my religious upbringing came from my Catholic mother, she's lapse and never followed any dietary traditions.
Logged
Lechasseur
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 9,035
France


Political Matrix
E: -0.52, S: 3.13

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2018, 05:11:07 PM »

No
Logged
Oldiesfreak1854
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 13,627
United States


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2018, 06:27:04 PM »

I try to follow the dietary laws that the SDA church requires, namely avoiding pork, shellfish, and any other non-kosher meats or seafood.  I don't follow kosher outside of that (I don't care about specific slaughtering methods, eating meat with dairy, etc.), and I don't follow the SDA recommendations of a vegetarian/vegan diet either, simply because that part is only encouraged and not required.  I've been looking into Seventh Day Baptists lately and I'm not sure I can call myself much of an Adventist anymore other than observing the Sabbath and following said dietary laws.  But even if I were to join the SDBs, I would probably continue to avoid pork for the most part, since pigs are kind of cool animals and hence I'm not too keen on eating them (not to mention that I was conditioned from the time I was little that pork is bad and shouldn't be eaten).  Just as eating cat, dog, or horse meat is a taboo in most Western cultures, so pork has become a personal taboo for me.
Logged
emotional hardcore
BRTD
Atlas Institution
*****
Posts: 94,246
Ukraine


Political Matrix
E: -6.50, S: -6.67

P P P

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2018, 09:52:44 PM »

nope
Logged
Cath
Cathcon
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 25,724
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2018, 09:55:57 PM »

Trying to.
Logged
TJ in Oregon
TJ in Cleve
Moderator
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 8,843
United States


Political Matrix
E: 0.13, S: 6.96

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2018, 05:22:41 PM »

Yes, I follow the rules to their letter. But the rule is a minimum and not a guideline, so I try to do a bit more to make sure I'm struggling enough. I think fasting is a good idea for Christians even if it's not a religious rule. I think it changes me.
Logged
America Needs Jesus Christ
ExtremeRepublican
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 9,130


Political Matrix
E: 7.35, S: 5.57

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2018, 08:22:46 PM »

No, my denomination has no dietary restrictions or fasts
Logged
The Puppeteer
Rookie
**
Posts: 41
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2021, 07:43:19 PM »

Fortunately I've never really had much difficulty in this regard.
Logged
America Needs Jesus Christ
ExtremeRepublican
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 9,130


Political Matrix
E: 7.35, S: 5.57

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2021, 11:11:51 PM »

No, my denomination has no dietary restrictions or fasts

Not sure I would still agree with this.  We certainly don't have any dietary restrictions, but I do fast occasionally when I am trying to pray and hear from God on a certain topic.  It's just not a scheduled/regular thing like it is in some religions.
Logged
Del Tachi
Republican95
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 10,383
United States


P P P

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2021, 10:53:27 AM »

I sometimes fast, but my denomination has not a doctrinal stance on the issue.
Logged
Associate Justice PiT
PiT (The Physicist)
Atlas Politician
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 29,379
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2021, 11:09:11 AM »

     I fast on Wednesdays and Fridays most weeks of the year, observe four major fasting seasons (Great Lent, Apostles Fast, Dormition Fast, and Nativity Fast), and also observe several additional fasting days (the Beheading of St. John the Baptist and the Exaltation of the Holy Cross come to mind as examples). Fasting consists in limiting intake of certain kinds of food. The most common form is no meat, eggs, dairy, or vertebrate fish, but there are also other forms.
Logged
1,066,892 Likud voters can't be wrong!
Nathan
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 28,011


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2021, 11:36:18 AM »

I follow the dietary restrictions for Lent, including one meal plus two snacks on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, but I'm uncomfortable going A and B the C of D like TJ does because I have issues with body image and disordered eating.
Logged
Хahar 🤔
Xahar
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 39,304
Bangladesh


Political Matrix
E: -6.77, S: 0.61

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2021, 02:44:33 PM »
« Edited: April 08, 2021, 03:47:23 PM by Хahar 🤔 »

Of course, which is relevant since Ramadan is coming up. Fasting was extremely difficult physically when I was in high school and it coincided with two-a-day football practice (9 AM to 12 PM and again 3 PM to 6 PM), but that was a long time ago now and it hasn't been difficult at all since then. On one level that doesn't make me feel great, because fasting is supposed to be difficult and if it's not it feels like I'm not getting anything out of it, but on the other hand it does make me focus on other aspects of Ramadan.

A common misconception is that the difficult thing is not being able to consume water during the day. This is in fact difficult if you're performing strenuous physical activity, but if you're sitting at a desk all day the only thing you'll feel is that you haven't eaten.
Logged
Scott🦋
Scott
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 35,830
Norway


Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -7.48

P P P

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2021, 03:22:49 PM »

     I fast on Wednesdays and Fridays most weeks of the year, observe four major fasting seasons (Great Lent, Apostles Fast, Dormition Fast, and Nativity Fast), and also observe several additional fasting days (the Beheading of St. John the Baptist and the Exaltation of the Holy Cross come to mind as examples). Fasting consists in limiting intake of certain kinds of food. The most common form is no meat, eggs, dairy, or vertebrate fish, but there are also other forms.

Are vegan versions of these food types allowed?
Logged
Associate Justice PiT
PiT (The Physicist)
Atlas Politician
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 29,379
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #14 on: April 09, 2021, 07:19:02 PM »

     I fast on Wednesdays and Fridays most weeks of the year, observe four major fasting seasons (Great Lent, Apostles Fast, Dormition Fast, and Nativity Fast), and also observe several additional fasting days (the Beheading of St. John the Baptist and the Exaltation of the Holy Cross come to mind as examples). Fasting consists in limiting intake of certain kinds of food. The most common form is no meat, eggs, dairy, or vertebrate fish, but there are also other forms.

Are vegan versions of these food types allowed?

     Yes, they are. The availability of vegan food alternatives in the Bay Area makes it much easier to observe the fast here than it would be in the South or the Midwest.
Logged
tack50
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 9,881
Spain


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2021, 07:33:04 PM »
« Edited: April 09, 2021, 07:36:24 PM by tack50 »

Not a Theist but this easter on Holy Friday I had a fun exchange with my dad.

Me: Why are you giving me a sausage for dinner?
Dad: Because that's the food we have
Me: Don't you know today is Holy Friday?
Dad: Since when are you a devout Catholic?
Me: lol

Now seriously my family actually used to follow the "no meat in Holy Friday" rule for quite a long time though it was quietly dropped without paying much attention to it some time in my teenage years iirc.

Other than that neither me nor any of my relatives have ever followed any dietary restrictions to my knowledge. Like I definitely haven't heard anyone, not even devoutly Catholic relatives of mine to do the full fasting on Holy Friday or Ash Wednesday; or the "no meat" rules on Lent Fridays (outside of Holy Friday itself).
Logged
🐒Gods of Prosperity🔱🐲💸
shua
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 23,299
Nepal


Political Matrix
E: 1.29, S: -0.70


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2021, 09:51:33 PM »

I don't usually think of my vegetarianism in religious terms ( I've gotten used to it, have multiple reasons for it, & do not keep to it as "religiously" as I once did. ) but thinking about this question reminds me that when I first decided on it in my junior year of high school, the religious aspect of it was an important part of how I thought about it.
Some of my friends and I were getting into charismatic spirituality at that time.  I remember thinking that if I was to be a vessel of God's healing in the world, I should not eat the violence of flesh; meat-eating itself being a result of the Fall, which Christ and the Holy Spirit are able to overcome. That, plus the fact that my sister and some of my other friends were vegetarian already, gave me the resolve to give up meat.

As for fasting, I have done it, for part of the day, a few times, years ago, while praying for someone. I've generally been hesitant at the idea of more formal fasting; it's enough work for me normally just figuring out what and when I can eat and feel relatively healthy.
Logged
Scott🦋
Scott
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 35,830
Norway


Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -7.48

P P P

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2021, 04:50:41 PM »

I don't usually think of my vegetarianism in religious terms ( I've gotten used to it, have multiple reasons for it, & do not keep to it as "religiously" as I once did. ) but thinking about this question reminds me that when I first decided on it in my junior year of high school, the religious aspect of it was an important part of how I thought about it.
Some of my friends and I were getting into charismatic spirituality at that time.  I remember thinking that if I was to be a vessel of God's healing in the world, I should not eat the violence of flesh; meat-eating itself being a result of the Fall, which Christ and the Holy Spirit are able to overcome. That, plus the fact that my sister and some of my other friends were vegetarian already, gave me the resolve to give up meat.

As for fasting, I have done it, for part of the day, a few times, years ago, while praying for someone. I've generally been hesitant at the idea of more formal fasting; it's enough work for me normally just figuring out what and when I can eat and feel relatively healthy.

Out of curiosity, does your vegetarianism extend to fish? As a carnivore, I never understood the vegetarian exemption for fish - which is clearly the meat of an animal no matter how you slice it. Many vegetarians are pescatarians, but that's almost always for health/dieting reasons and not moral ones.

Also, do you believe that no-slaughter factory farming (i.e. to produce milk and dairy) is morally right?
Logged
🐒Gods of Prosperity🔱🐲💸
shua
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 23,299
Nepal


Political Matrix
E: 1.29, S: -0.70


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2021, 08:46:19 PM »

I don't usually think of my vegetarianism in religious terms ( I've gotten used to it, have multiple reasons for it, & do not keep to it as "religiously" as I once did. ) but thinking about this question reminds me that when I first decided on it in my junior year of high school, the religious aspect of it was an important part of how I thought about it.
Some of my friends and I were getting into charismatic spirituality at that time.  I remember thinking that if I was to be a vessel of God's healing in the world, I should not eat the violence of flesh; meat-eating itself being a result of the Fall, which Christ and the Holy Spirit are able to overcome. That, plus the fact that my sister and some of my other friends were vegetarian already, gave me the resolve to give up meat.

As for fasting, I have done it, for part of the day, a few times, years ago, while praying for someone. I've generally been hesitant at the idea of more formal fasting; it's enough work for me normally just figuring out what and when I can eat and feel relatively healthy.

Out of curiosity, does your vegetarianism extend to fish? As a carnivore, I never understood the vegetarian exemption for fish - which is clearly the meat of an animal no matter how you slice it. Many vegetarians are pescatarians, but that's almost always for health/dieting reasons and not moral ones.

Also, do you believe that no-slaughter factory farming (i.e. to produce milk and dairy) is morally right?

I don't eat fish but the idea that someone would feel okay eating fish but not birds or especially mammals makes a lot of sense to me.  As you get closer on the Great Chain of Being to animals with resemblances or personal relationships to humans, it can feel different to think about eating them.  I've sometimes wondered if trying to eat fish on a regular basis would the best thing for my health, and if I determine it is I would do so, but I would not call myself a vegetarian at that point since it seems a bit of a misnomer.

As for dairy farming, at the level of production, condition of animals involved is probably a more significant moral question than just whether they are killed, even though that may not line up exactly with how comfortable I am in consuming free range meat vs factory farmed cheese.
Logged
Pages: [1]  
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

Page created in 0.053 seconds with 14 queries.