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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  Election What-ifs? (Moderators: Abandon hope all ye who register here, Apocrypha)
  Four More Years - a 2016 Election Timeline (search mode)
Pages: [1]
Poll
Question: Who should Obama choose as his Running Mate?
#1
Tim Kaine
#2
Julian Castro
#3
Tom Vilsack
#4
Amy Klobucher
#5
Kirsten Gillibrand
#6
Al Franken
#7
Jeff Merkley
#8
John Hickenlooper
#9
Martin Heinrich
#10
WHO SHOULD TRUMP CHOOSE?
#11
Newt Gingrich
#12
Ben Carson
#13
Chris Christie
#14
Mary Fallin
#15
Scott Brown
#16
Marsha Blackburn
#17
Mike Flynn
#18
Jeff Sessions
#19
Jim Webb
Show Pie Chart
Partisan results


Author Topic: Four More Years - a 2016 Election Timeline  (Read 41675 times)
Don Vito Corleone
bruhgmger2
Atlas Politician
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 1,986
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -5.91

« on: October 14, 2017, 05:31:11 am »

#Obama2016
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Don Vito Corleone
bruhgmger2
Atlas Politician
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 1,986
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -5.91

« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2017, 02:37:50 pm »

April 19th, 2016

Obama wins New York Primary; Sanders Campaign on the ropes



NEW YORK CITY - The Sanders campaign hoped for a different result here tonight, but it did not come to pass. President Barack Obama, carried by a strong popularity in the state and armed with the endorsements of its two Senators, its Governor and the mayor of its biggest City, won the state of New York by a solid margin, nearly in the double digits.

Indeed, the President's victory speech before a large crowd in his campaign's NYC headquarters almost sounded like a proclamation of victory in the primaries. He did not even mention Sanders' name, save for one time when he thanked him for "running a spirited campaign", and focused mainly on the Republicans. In one part of the speech, which went immediately viral, Obama jabbed Republican frontrunner Donald Trump, quirking that "Donald Trump thinks New Yorkers will support him because he was born here, but I'm gonna need to see a birth certificate to believe that". The birther movement that Trump lead, considered racist by many, is expected to be a main line of attack for the Obama campaign in the general election, assuming both frontrunners do win their party's nomination.

Though there was a frevour of rumours that Sanders would drop out of the race after New York was called for Obama a mere twenty minutes after poll closing time, he did not do it in the end. The Independent Senator spoke to a disappointed but still enthusiastic crowd of supporters, promising that "this is not the end" and that "we will continue fighting for a political revolution because the survival of the American working class depends on it". Nonetheless, the Sanders campaign is considered on the ropes- fundraising is growing alarmingly weaker, and according to inside sources, the northeastern primaries next week are considered make-or-break. If Sanders is unable to do well then, the sources claim, the Sanders campaign will transfer from a campaign intending to win into a protest candidacy, attempting to take as many delegates as possible in favourable states such as West Virginia or Kentucky.

As expected, the split between Obama and Sanders almost looked like a Democrat VS Republican map. Obama won big margins in the five boroughs of New York, save for Staten Island, which Sanders won, and in Long Island. Meanwhile, Sanders did very well in upstate, rural counties, winning most of them. Once again, minorities propelled the President to victory, as Sanders won 51-46 among whites and Obama won 90-9 and 61-36 among black and latino voters respectively. Once again, Sanders won narrowly among white voters while Obama took the rest. Sanders also swept independents 76-24, while Obama easily won registered Democrats 64-34. Let's look at the results:


Democratic New York Primary results, 100% counted:
Barack Obama- 52.0% (138 pledged delegates) ✓
Bernie Sanders- 41.5% (109 pledged delegates)
Hillary Clinton- 6.3% (0 pledged delegates)
Others- 0.2% (0 pledged delegates)
NY was a closed primary where only Registered Democrats were allowed to vote, so shouldn't Obama's margin among Registered Democrats be the exact same as his margin statewide?
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Don Vito Corleone
bruhgmger2
Atlas Politician
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 1,986
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -5.91

« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2017, 03:05:38 pm »
« Edited: October 20, 2017, 03:09:54 pm by bruhgmger2 »

April 19th, 2016

Obama wins New York Primary; Sanders Campaign on the ropes



NEW YORK CITY - The Sanders campaign hoped for a different result here tonight, but it did not come to pass. President Barack Obama, carried by a strong popularity in the state and armed with the endorsements of its two Senators, its Governor and the mayor of its biggest City, won the state of New York by a solid margin, nearly in the double digits.

Indeed, the President's victory speech before a large crowd in his campaign's NYC headquarters almost sounded like a proclamation of victory in the primaries. He did not even mention Sanders' name, save for one time when he thanked him for "running a spirited campaign", and focused mainly on the Republicans. In one part of the speech, which went immediately viral, Obama jabbed Republican frontrunner Donald Trump, quirking that "Donald Trump thinks New Yorkers will support him because he was born here, but I'm gonna need to see a birth certificate to believe that". The birther movement that Trump lead, considered racist by many, is expected to be a main line of attack for the Obama campaign in the general election, assuming both frontrunners do win their party's nomination.

Though there was a frevour of rumours that Sanders would drop out of the race after New York was called for Obama a mere twenty minutes after poll closing time, he did not do it in the end. The Independent Senator spoke to a disappointed but still enthusiastic crowd of supporters, promising that "this is not the end" and that "we will continue fighting for a political revolution because the survival of the American working class depends on it". Nonetheless, the Sanders campaign is considered on the ropes- fundraising is growing alarmingly weaker, and according to inside sources, the northeastern primaries next week are considered make-or-break. If Sanders is unable to do well then, the sources claim, the Sanders campaign will transfer from a campaign intending to win into a protest candidacy, attempting to take as many delegates as possible in favourable states such as West Virginia or Kentucky.

As expected, the split between Obama and Sanders almost looked like a Democrat VS Republican map. Obama won big margins in the five boroughs of New York, save for Staten Island, which Sanders won, and in Long Island. Meanwhile, Sanders did very well in upstate, rural counties, winning most of them. Once again, minorities propelled the President to victory, as Sanders won 51-46 among whites and Obama won 90-9 and 61-36 among black and latino voters respectively. Once again, Sanders won narrowly among white voters while Obama took the rest. Sanders also swept independents 76-24, while Obama easily won registered Democrats 64-34. Let's look at the results:


Democratic New York Primary results, 100% counted:
Barack Obama- 52.0% (138 pledged delegates) ✓
Bernie Sanders- 41.5% (109 pledged delegates)
Hillary Clinton- 6.3% (0 pledged delegates)
Others- 0.2% (0 pledged delegates)
NY was a closed primary where only Registered Democrats were allowed to vote, so shouldn't Obama's margin among Registered Democrats be the exact same as his margin statewide?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Democratic_primary,_2016
I was going by that article, where it said that Sanders won independents overwhelmingly, and that they were 14% of the electorate. Is it wrong?
That's referring to political ideology, not party registration. So, for example, Chris Wallace is a registered Democrat and could vote in the NY Democratic primary, even though he describes himself an an independent. Had he voted in the NY Democratic Primary, he would be listed as one of the 14% that are independents, even though he is a registered Democrat.
EDIT: Nevermind. You fixed it.
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