War of the Grand Coalitions (CoE) 1756-?
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  War of the Grand Coalitions (CoE) 1756-?
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Spamage
spamage
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« on: August 08, 2017, 07:06:00 PM »
« edited: August 14, 2017, 11:12:38 PM by Spamage »

War of the Grand Coalitions


Context: 1756 saw a shift in the state of European diplomacy with the formation of two new alliance groups, the British allying the Prussians and the French allying the Austrians. The other powers were forced to join either bloc or remain neutral. After months of building tension, with open fighting already occuring in the New World, the British took the lead in declaring war against their longtime enemies the French, George II specifically citing the French harboring of the longtime Jacobite pretender Bonnie Prince Charlie. Now the world's first global war has begun with fighting expected on at least three seperate continents. Will it expand more? Only time will tell...

Belligerents:

Kingdom of France
Archduchy of Austria
Kingdom of Sweden
Royalist Poland (1756-1757)
Sejmist Poland (1757-)
Irish Rebels (1757-)
Duchy of Bavaria
Archbishop-Electorate of Mainz
Archbishop-Electorare of Wurzburg
Electorate of Saxony
Maratha Confederacy
Wabanaki Confederacy
Huron

vs.
Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Prussia
United Provinces of the Netherlands
Kingdom of Denmark-Norway
Ottoman Empire (1757-)
Kingdom of Portugal (1757-)
Sejmist Poland (1756-1757)
Royalist Poland (1757-)
Mughal Empire
Iroqouis Confederacy
Cherokee

General War Rules (sorry Lumine, your's were too perfect for me not to base mine off of them Smiley )

1.- Thread Use: This thread will be used for everything related to the war, largely updates on the battle results and map changes.

2.- Turns: Due to slower transportation times in this earlier period of warfare, I've decided one turn of war will equal one game turn. Orders should be sent via PM within the same timeframe as your other responses.

3.- Moves: Post your moves and I will calculate the result. I'll use a random number generator for the battles (from the point of view of the attacker and the defender), and results and offensives will be corrected for historical accuracy. Margins between the two numbers will determine the level of victory.


1-20 stalemate
21-40 Pyrrhic victory
41-60 slight victory
61-80 major victory
81-99 decisive victory
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Chancellor Tanterterg
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2017, 07:59:12 PM »

Shouldn't there be a way for any differences in army size to be accounted for?
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windjammer
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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2017, 08:07:48 PM »

Shouldn't there be a way for any differences in army size to be accounted for?
^^^^
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Spamage
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2017, 08:20:33 PM »
« Edited: August 08, 2017, 08:22:57 PM by Spamage »


Yeah, sorry I forgot to mention that. Thanks for saying something. Tongue

The side with the larger army receives a bonus to their number (number varies depending on the advantage in manpower size). There are also smaller bonuses for terrain, certain leaders, and quality of army.

Also want to note this system will be used for sea battles as well. Ships can be damaged, sunk, or captured over the course of fighting.

Casualties (which I intend to keep track of during the course of the war) will likewise be determined by the number generator, depending on the level of defeat/victory.
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Lumine
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« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2017, 08:40:37 PM »

So sorry to be intrusive, Spamage, but the reason why I abandoned the "random number system" after Balance of Power was because it was not really accurate at the hour of determining results, which meant minimizing the choices of the players.

I would strongly advise you to use the dice system instead (through a random dice generator), because that one allows you to better implement bonuses and penalties, and account for army size, commanders, terrains and so on. It also means the player's choices are more relevant, which I think is something we all want.

It would be easier for you as GM, and I think it would work better for us as players.
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windjammer
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« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2017, 08:43:43 PM »

Next balance of power game I really need to become Assistant game moderator lol.
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Chancellor Tanterterg
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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2017, 09:07:49 PM »

So sorry to be intrusive, Spamage, but the reason why I abandoned the "random number system" after Balance of Power was because it was not really accurate at the hour of determining results, which meant minimizing the choices of the players.

I would strongly advise you to use the dice system instead (through a random dice generator), because that one allows you to better implement bonuses and penalties, and account for army size, commanders, terrains and so on. It also means the player's choices are more relevant, which I think is something we all want.

It would be easier for you as GM, and I think it would work better for us as players.

Agree 110%
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Spamage
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2017, 09:14:37 PM »
« Edited: August 08, 2017, 09:16:27 PM by Spamage »

So sorry to be intrusive, Spamage, but the reason why I abandoned the "random number system" after Balance of Power was because it was not really accurate at the hour of determining results, which meant minimizing the choices of the players.

I would strongly advise you to use the dice system instead (through a random dice generator), because that one allows you to better implement bonuses and penalties, and account for army size, commanders, terrains and so on. It also means the player's choices are more relevant, which I think is something we all want.

It would be easier for you as GM, and I think it would work better for us as players.

I'm actually going to have to push back a little on this point, though no one here can challenge your experience at moderating Lumine. Smiley I was initially leaning towards dice, but considering all the factors made me second-guess a bit.

This system differs from the original BoP system in several ways. First of all, there's two number being generated instead of one. These are meant to simulate the overall performance of the troops on the day of battle, something which no commander is ever able to truly predict. Rather than being an arbitrary number based on one side in order to determine victory (as one random number generated was), both groups get their own performance numbers (two high numbers means high casualties, two low means low casualties) and the margin, rather than a sole number, is what determines the outcome (once predetermined bonuses are added of course). This allows for realistic outcomes, but does not exclude the crazy ones (of which there were plenty in OTL when people overcame large odds or disadvantages, look at Frederick the Great in the 7YW Wink )

I find dice a little to restrictive, tbh. There's alot of categories I'd like to include (morale, terrain, level of surprise) that I feel can't be truly done justice with the standard 6 sided die, even with multiple going. I'm personally treating the number generator as more of a 100-sided die, if that makes any sense.

If a majority of players want to switch though, I'd be more than willing. (Though that means my spreadsheets are ruined Cry Wink )
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Spamage
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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2017, 10:11:29 PM »
« Edited: August 09, 2017, 10:53:21 PM by Spamage »

Jul-Dec 1756

Summary:
The War got off to a bloody start with major battles in the Americas, India, and Europe. The Mughals were dealt a serious blow by the Marathas, France found itself pushed back at every turn, and the Prussians rolled over Saxony, only to hit a brick wall in Bohemia. To the north, the Swedes and Danes struggled over Norway as the Swedish fleet hid in port. Most shocking however, was the dragging in of Poland-Lithuania into the conflict as Prussia proclaimed the cause of the Sejm during their seizure of Polish land. The War continues to grow as early casualty numbers show thousands dead on both sides.

North American Theater:

Battle of the Ohio Valley: Slight British Victory

Seeking to recreate his success from the victory at Fort Duquesne, Loudon and his men quickly burned down the French fortifications and marched west, trying to chase their foes down the Ohio River Valley. The exhausted French forces seemed to be running out of options when the 10,000 men sent from France earlier in the year arrived to reinforce them. The now 18,000 man French army turned around, were joined by native allies, and prepared a defense. The British, confident in their abilities, lightly attacked and took down quite a bit of French and Indian soldiers. Many of the French soldiers, new to New World warfare, were uneasy, so their commander ordered a retreat, despite superior numbers, setting up a Fort on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. By the end of the day 143 British soldiers had fallen, with 360 French slain and 600 of their native allies killed over the following weeks. Though the British won control of the Ohio Valley, their army sits outnumbered, nearing winter, with native foes all around them.

Assault on Louisbourg: Major British Victory

A second British expedition was launched from the 13 Colonies, attempting to seize the vital Fort of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island. The 12,000 men caught the 1,000 man garrison of the Island off-guard, with the Fort lacking provisions necessary for a long seige. Despite this, those inside remained determined to hold out, forcing the much larger British forces to attempt to seize it. The Battle lasted for several days, with 720 British regulars either killed or injured. Yet they emerged victorious, capturing or killing the 1,000 men who had held the fort.

Indian Theater:

Battle of Indore: Major Maratha Victory

Neither European power chose to take an active role in the early months in India, the British and French eyeing each-other with mutual suspicion. Though the British navy did undertake bombards of the French ports, the local commanders never deemed it safe enough for an assault on Pondicherry. Instead, their local allies decided to fight each-other, with the French-backed Marathas attacking the British-backed Mughals. A sizeable Maratha force marched north towards Indore, calling the local Hindus to arms. They ended up facing a slightly larger Mughal force. In a decisive battle the Marathas swept all before them, forcing the Mughals into an embarrassing retreat. Indore was quickly captured with the Marathas looking north for further attacks. 240 Maratha soldiers were killed, compared to 1,800 Mughals.

European Theater:

Battle of Brussels: Slight Dutch/British/Danish Victory

Before the first major battle of the War fought in Europe, both sides were rushing headfirst into a fight. The Dutch and newly-landed British and (smaller) Danish forces were convinced they could win a quick victory in France, reportedly believing the bulk of the French forces were headed to Hanover. The French, on the other hand, emptied their garrisons, gathered their men, and launched a grand assault on the Netherlands, wanting to quickly knock the United Provinces out of the war. The 132,000 man French army encountered the 85,000 Dutch-Anglo-Danish force at Brussels, in the middle of the Austrian Netherlands. While the French had the clear advantage in numbers, the Dutch forces held the better ground, and were quickly backed by Flemish locals looking to shake off the Austrian yoke. The Battle of Brussels was fierce, as the French repeatedly assaulted the Dutch positions. By the end of the day, unable to take the field and demoralized by heavy casualties, the French were forced to retreat south and await further instructions. 13,585 Frenchmen died compared to 6,500 of the allied forces. (4,000 Dutch, 2,000 British, and 500 Danes). The Dutch gained control of the Northern Austrian Netherlands, but remain outnumbered by the French.

Invasion of Swedish Pommerania: Decisive Prussian Victory

As soon as Sweden entered the War, Frederick II ordered an 8,000 man force to quickly capture Swedish Pommerania. The small garrison, heavily outnumbered and blockaded by the Anglo-Danish Navy in the Baltic, was quickly forced into submission. 112 Prussians were killed, with 500 Swedes surrendering.

Battle of Gdansk: Decisive Prussian Victory

Without ever formally declaring war, Frederick the Great ordered the Prussian forces to intervene in Poland. Taking advantage of the Civil War, and immediately declaring for the Sejm, 30,000 Prussian troops moved from East Prussia and Pommerania to establish a corridor along the Baltic Sea controlled by Prussia. The local garrisons of Augustus III, completely caught off-guard, surrendered one after the other, including the proud city of Gdansk (Danzig). 1,000 Poles surrendered, with 900 Prussian soldiers either killed or wounded by angry locals.

Invasion of Saxony: Decisive Prussian Victory

In a similar vein as the assault on Poland, and simultaneously, Frederick II personally led a 65,000 man army in a surprise assault on Saxony. The roughly 30,000 man Saxon force was caught off-guard, and largely leaderless with Augustus III away fighting the Sejm rebels in Poland. After a quick battle at Torgau, which saw the Prussians humiliate the Saxons, Leipzig fell in surprise. With local resistance surprisingly fierce, it was two weeks later before Dresden was captured, much of the beautiful city damaged in the fighting. 2,100 Prussians were made casualties in the invasion of Saxony, compared to 4,000 Saxon soldiers. The remaining Saxon army surrendered, but refused Frederick's demands that they fight for Prussia.

Invasion of Bohemia: Major Austrian Victory

With the Prussians seeking to keep the ball rolling, Frederick ordered an assault on Bohemia within weeks of capturing Saxony. Unlike Saxony and Poland though, the Austrians were waiting for a Prussian attack. 62,900 Prussians faced a fresh 75,000 man Austrian army. Despite repeated attempts to break the Austrian lines, the Prussian forces were too tired and unable to push on further. Frederick was forced to order a retreat, his men marching back into Saxony as the Austrians celebrated their victory. 2,470 Prussians were lost compared to 1,000 Austrians.

Battle of Opole: Decisive Royalist/Austrian Victory

With the Father's War in full-swing in Poland, Augustus III enlisted the help of the Austrian forces to defeat the 12,000 man rebel army in the south of Poland. The 35,000 Austrians and a sizeable Royalist contingent easily crushed the field army of the Sejm nobles, taking many prominent rebel leaders hostage. Augustus III was present to celebrate the victory, though the aftermath would not be so happy. Rather than surrender, the Sejmist rebels began an intense, localized guerilla war. They cited Augustus' use of foreign soldiers as a grievance in order to rally more to their cause.

Battle of Lithuania: Decisive Royalist/Russian Victory

The Russians were enlisted to help win the Father's War for Augustus in the North, with a massive, 150,000 man combined Russian Royalist force hunting down the outnumbered rebels. After a quick field victory, similar to the south, all major Lithuanian towns were captured by Augustus III, but the locals in rural areas began an intense guerilla campaign specifically against the Russian supply trains, the rebels seeing how vulnerable such a large force was. Thus, while the Sejmist cause seems to have collapsed like a house of cards, they've instead resorted to rural, brutal warfare against royalists on a local level.

Assault of East Prussia: Major Russian Victory

Empress Elizabeth's army continued its march west after defeating the Polish rebels, launching an invasion of East Prussia, with the forces except for the garrisons away fighting the Poles and Saxons. The battle between the vastly outnumbered 2,000 Prussians and the 112,500 Russians was fierce but quick, with the local garrisons of East East Prussia surrendering. Now Konigsberg lays open for the Russian army, though intense local resistance and supply train issues  have cost the Russians 7,875 men.

Swedish Invasion of Norway: Slight Swedish Victory

A 20,000 man army under the command of Augustin Ehrensvärd agressively moved against the Danes in Norway, seeking to make up for little naval action during this period of the war. A quick battle was fought over Christiana which saw the local 15,000 man Danish forces pushed out of the city. The Danes moved north, relocating to Lillehammer, while the Swedes began an uneasy occupation of Christiana, with the local populace showing a clear preferance for Denmark over their historical Swedish rivals. 800 Swedes were either killed or wounded, compared to 900 Danes.




Casualties so far:
16,945 French
12,375 Russians

7,582 Prussians
5,090 Sejmists

4,200 Saxons
4,000 Dutch
3,563 British

3,500 Poles
1,800 Mughals
1,400 Danes

1,000 Austrians
800 Swedes
600 Huron
240 Marathans

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Spamage
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« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2017, 10:11:05 PM »

Jan-Jun 1757

Summary:
Fighting continues across the globe, with major victories scored for both coalitions. The Dutch, outnumbered and defeated in the Austrian Netherlands, have been forced north and their nation sits on the verge of collapse. The Prussians knocked the Bavarians out of the War, while the Ottomans and Russians maintain a close contest in a variety of areas. Meanwhile the first naval battles have occurred, with the dominance of the British on the sea seeming to have been reaffirmed. Undoubtedly, with such mixed signals fighting will continue to develop as more powers join and casualty lists continue to grow.

North American Theater:
Second Battle of the Ohio Valley: Stalemate

The French forces in Ohio sought to avenge the disappointing year of 1756, deciding to launch an attack on their outnumbered British opponents. Though they held the advantage of terrain and were assisted by local native allies, they discovered their enemy had constructed a series of forts to house their army in the winter. Fighting was joined, but with 700 French dead (compared to 1200 British), they were unable to take the field. French commanders decided to return west rather than besieging the outposts without supplies. No ground was gained for either faction.

Invasion of Quebec: Major French Victory

Seeking to follow up on their victory at Fort Louisbourg, the British army began to advance southwest towards Quebec City. It was not long before they encountered a French army, smaller than their own, but still formidable. With local forces helping the existing French garrison, the British were pushed out of the region and forced back east, taking numerous casualties in the process. Quebec seems secure for the French, at least for now.

Invasion of French Guiana: Decisive Portuguese Victory

The only French colony in South America proved easy pickings for the much larger Portuguese force sent from Brazil to acquire it. After a brief show of force and rapid movement, the entire territory was controlled by Portugal within the span of a month. Little resistance remains as the colonists have accepted Portuguese government.

Indian Theater:

French Invasion of Bengal: Slight French Victory

After seeing little action in 1756 from the European powers, the French army decided to assault the British holdings in Bengal, hoping to knock one of their five opponents (British, Mughal, Dutch, Portuguese, Mysoreian) on the subcontinent out of the war in the region. Though they gained ground, they failed to completely seize the British colony, though a lot of land was gained, leaving the region vulnerable to more fighting in the future.

Battle of the Narmada: Slight Mughal Victory

The Marathas, feeling confident after their victory in the Battle of Indore, sought to follow up with a full-on invasion of the north. They appear to have over-stretched themselves though, and the Mughals were able to launch a surprise attack on the smaller army. After a series of skirmishes, the Marathas have been forced back south, losing Indore in the process, now using the Narmada River as a barrier to put a check on further Mughal attempts to regain their territory.

European Theater:

Battle of Christiana:
Stalemate

King Frederick V was clearly determined to end the embarrassing situation in Norway, and thus decided to launch a 60,000 man expedition to retake the city. Upon landing his men, it was realized the town was lightly held, with the Swedes having raced north to besiege the smaller Danish garrison at Lillehammer. They were quickly alerted to the presence of the joint Danish-Prussian army and a battle was begun. After two days of fighting there was no clear victor and both sides withdrew. Though the Danes regained the important city of Christiana, this victory was canceled out by slight Swedish gains to its immediate north.

Battle of the Baltic Sea:
Slight British-Danish Victory

The Swedish were eager to retake naval supremacy in the Baltic, viewing it as vital for their operations in the region. With this in mind they attempted, in concert with the fleet of their Russian allies, to launch a surprise movement against Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. While they were able to launch a couple of rounds into the city, killing several hundred civilians, it was not long before the British-Danish force showed up on scene. After a day-long battle, with both the Swedes and Russians losing 8 ships compared to smaller losses for their opponents, their fleet was forced to withdraw, hiding in the nearest ports available. British and Danish naval control on the Baltic may have been cemented.

Battle of Cork: Slight British Victory

The Southern Army of Ireland sent by the British initially seemed to have some success. The men managed to disembark, capturing Cork with minimal resistance. Local skirmishes, provoked in opposition to the open massacring of Irish civilians, burning of churches, and even one case of a school being filled with children and set ablaze provoked strong local backlash, preventing the army from moving north. Though Cork is held, the surrounding regions are teeming with furious Irish who make up for their deficiency in arms with their outrage and fury.

Battle of Ulster: Decisive Irish Victory

The expeditionary force to the north had much less success in quelling the rebellion around Ulster. Immediately upon landing, it was clear the 10,000 man army was vastly outnumbered by the local rebels 2:1. They sought to march south and recapture land, but were surrounded by the rebels who knew the area far better than they ever could. After a particularly brutal battle, the British were forced to retreat to Belfast, where the Irish rebels have begun to besiege the city. With news of the defeat to the north, Dublin capitulated to the rebels and took up the cause of James III.

Assault on Toulon: Major British-Portuguese-Ottoman Victory

The Portuguese took the lead in an attack against the half of the French navy docked at Toulon. Gathering a large fleet, including numerous British and Ottoman vessels, they surprised the local French command. Though, by a happy coincidence, the fleet was out of harbor conducting drills, voiding plans to use fire-ships. It was a brutal engagement for the French regardless though, with more than 10 ships-of-the-line sunk along with 6 Frigates. No boats were captured. The Portuguese and Ottomans both also faced minor losses, though smaller than the French.

War on the Danube: Stalemate

A joint Russian-Austrian Army formed following the evacuation of the large Russian force from East Prussia. With the Ottomans taking a defensive position, hoping to tie down the Austrians, the Russians were determined to attack. The body crossed the Danube River, hoping to make rapid gains against the Turks. The fighting would largely prove indecisive though, despite the heavier casualties felt by the Russians and Austrians. Ultimately they gained a bit of territory at the cost of about 7,000 soldiers total.

Invasion of Crimea: Stalemate

The Russian efforts to similarly assault Crimea, an Ottoman protectorate, were frustrated by equal losses. A large, 80,000 man army marched against 50,000 Crimeans. While the Russians were better equiped, they lacked the discipline of the Crimeans soldiers. After a series of indecisive battle the Russians made modest territorial gains, though they took heavier losses than their opponents.

Second Battle of Brussels & Invasion of the Netherlands: Decisive French Victory

With the British forces withdrawn to deal with the Irish Rebellion, the small Dutch army of 36,000 found itself opposed to almost 100,000 Frenchmen. The number of their opponents only grew when Louis XV ordered a second army to the region and the Archbishops of Mainz and Trier sent their forces to assist. It could easily be predicted what followed. The Dutch were humiliated on the field in the Second Battle of Brussels and forced to flee north, hoping to turn around and defend their homeland. The morale loss was too great however, and the massive French force was able to slam even further north, ransacking much of the Netherlands and bringing the region to its knees. Marie Louise followed the example of William of Orange during the invasion of Louis XIV and ordered the Dikes be broken, flooding the regions and making transportation very difficult for the French. Despite this, much of the United Provinces has been seized and the war effort there seems on the verge of collapsing all-together.

Battle of Munich: Decisive Prussian Victory

With the Russians evacuating East Prussia for Austria, Frederick II seized the initiative and launched a surprise attack. While the Austrians waited for an attack in Bohemia, the Prussian King looped around the region entirely, invading their new ally Bavaria. The surprise of this move caught the Bavarians off-guard and their outnumbered forces were easily swept aside by the more disciplined and numerous Prussian soldiers. The Duke, despite his ties to Austria, recognized the situation and quickly surrendered as most of his territory was occupied by the Prussians. Frederick took him prisoner as he prepared for the second part of his plan.

Battle of Salzburg: Stalemate

The Prussian forces were then ordered to follow up on their victory in Bavaria by capturing Vienna, and hopefully Empress Maria Theresa. Panic ruled in Vienna, while the Empress maintained a calm demeanor, ordering the army in Bohemia to rush south and prevent the seizure of the Capital. A battle was begun between the two forces, each numbering more than one hundred thousand men. While 4,000 Prussians were lost compared to 1,200 Austrians, they invaders were able to maintain their position in Salzburg, with the fighting largely being a stalemate.
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Spamage
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« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2017, 10:12:18 PM »
« Edited: August 19, 2017, 01:54:16 AM by Spamage »



Casualties so far:
24,937 Russians
21,509 French

18,122 Prussians
13,000 Dutch
8,146 British

7,200 Bavarians
5,300 Ottomans
5,290 Austrians
5,120 Mughals
5,090 Sejmists
5,000 Crimeans
4,200 Saxons
4,101 Danes
3,502 Polish Royalists
3,028 Swedes
3,011 Irish
2,733 Marathans
600 Huron
350 Portuguese


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« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2017, 12:03:31 AM »
« Edited: August 21, 2017, 12:30:50 PM by Spamage »

Updated list, I need to keep track with the war expanding so much Smiley


Belligerents Jun. 1757:

Kingdom of France
Archduchy of Austria
Russian Empire
Kingdom of Sweden
Royalist Poland (1756-1757)
Irish Rebels (1757-)
Duchy of Bavaria (1757)
Archbishop-Electorate of Mainz
Archbishop-Electorare of Wurzburg
Sardinia-Piedmont (1757-)
Duchy of Tuscany (1757-)
Irish Jacobites (1757-)
Electorate of Saxony
Maratha Confederacy
Wabanaki Confederacy
Huron
76,010 killed

vs.
Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Prussia
United Provinces of the Netherlands
Kingdom of Denmark-Norway
Ottoman Empire (1757-)
Kingdom of Portugal (1757-)
Sejmist Poland (1756-1757)
Cossack Rebels (1757-)
Mecklenburg (1757-)
Oldenburg (1757-)
Mughal Empire
Mysore (1757-)
Iroqouis Confederacy
Cherokee
64,319 killed
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« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2017, 12:20:20 AM »

Jun-Dec 1757

Summary:
Decisive battles are finally won in several theaters, though stalemates continue to linger in others.

North American Theater:
War in the Ohio Valley: Major British Victory

After a year of setbacks and inconclusive fighting, both sides were determined to break the stalemate in North America, attacking almost simultaneously. The twi forces met in a series of engagements which ultimately saw the defeat of the French Army at the hands of the British on multiple occasions. Demoralized and confused, the French army, while still numerous, has fled south (to present day Arkansas). While the British seem to control the all-important Ohio Valley, it is still possible for a French counter-expedition to challenge them once more.

Assault on New Orleans: Decisive Portuguese Victory

With no other fighting in the New World by Brazil, the Portuguese government decided on a surprise expedition to invade the important port of New Orleans. The French populace and local government was caught entirely off-guard when more than 30 Portuguese vessels appeared, demanding the immeadiate surrender of the important city. After a brief scuffle, which saw several locals killed, the Portuguese took hold of the city and the surrounding countryside. It remains to be seen what the French army to the north, now cut off from supplies, will do.

Indian Theater:
War in Bengal: Stalemate

While the French had been making progress against the British in India, they were suprised by the arrival of reinforcements and thus were pushed from the offensive position into a defensive one. Despite this change, the British army was held off and neither power made any decisive gains in the region.

Invasion of Mauritius, the Seychelles, and Reunion: Decisive Portuguese Victory

Rather than assaulting the neutral Dutch colonies in Africa, the Portuguese decided to invade the vulnerable French territories in the Indian Ocean. The tiny settlements were caught off guard and quickly seized, with no locals willing to die in fighting. Portugal seems to have further solidified its dominance in the Indian Ocean.

Maratha-Mughal War: Major Marathan Victory

With the Europeans squabbling over their colonies, the two native realms in India continued to fight oneanother. The Mughals, overconfident following their previous victory, were determined to keep up the pressure. They were far too ambitious however, and were slaughtered in a Maratha ambush. Thus the Mughals have begun an ignominious flight north, being closely pursued by their rivals. There is even talk of them exiting the war.

European Theater:
War in Southern Ireland: Slight Irish Victory

While the British forces were much more merciful to the Irish populace in the south outside of Cork, they remained outnumbered and without widespread support. In a series of hit-and-run moves, the local rebels managed to harass the British Army, to the extent that a panicked commander in Cork saw no other choice than to withdraw his army from Ireland back to Wales. Although the British have lost their position in Cork, the Southern Irish Army is largely in tact, even if it is no longer in Ireland.

War in Ulster: Stalemate

Though the British Army was much more numerous in the northern half of the Kingdom, and was thus more sucessful in regaining territory, they faced a fiece Jacobite resistance. Bonnie Prince Charlie, smuggling himself into Ireland, personally led the rebels in their consistent and sucessful attempt to prevent any British movements south. Thus, with slight casualties on both sides, a stalemate has ensued.

Battle of Lillehammer: Stalemate

Despite clever tricks on the part of both sides (army concealments, looping around, and suprise attacks) the Swedes and the Danes found themselves yet again unable to strike a fatal blow against their enemy. After several days of skirmishing the Danish recovered more areas of Norway in the south, though the Swedes grabbed as much land as possible in the north (capturing a stunned Trondheim). With equal casualties, and roughly equal armies, it remains to be seen what will happen in this theater.

Second Battle of Salzburg and the Battle of Vienna: Decisive Prussian Victory

Determined to beat the Austrians before the French arrived, Frederick of Prussia unleashed one of his infamous schemes against his opponents. Despite being outnumbered by the Austrians, the King of Prussia undertook a variety of complex actions during the fighting that saw the Austrian army completely surrounded and stunned by the Prussians. The fighting was intense, with thousands of Austrians being killed compared to relatively few of their opponents. After suffering for so long, a desperate charge managed to break a hole in the Prussian forces and the shattered army began a desperate retreat south, fleeing towards the Adriatic.

This action left Vienna open for the Prussians. Frederick's agents attempted to infiltrate the capitol, but were given away by their distinct accents (their Prussian German was different than Austrian German). In the confusion an attempt was made to evacuate the royal family and to set up the city for a siege, when the Prussian forces appeared. After a brutal bombardment, the Vienna itself surrendered. Maria Theresa and her numerous children were captured by the Prussians on their flight out of the city in a dramatic scene (will be explained in the news update). The Austrian War effort seems to have been dealt a fatal blow.

Invasion of Bohemia: Decisive Prussian Victory

Taking advantage of the distracted state of the Austrians, with most of their men fighting the invasion of Salzburg, a second Prussian army crossed into Bohemia from Saxony under the leadership of Prince Henry. The Bohemians themselves were ambivalent about the invasion, though the local commanders were determined to fight to the last men. They holed up in Prague, but were faced with a far more numerous Prussian army and a reluctant populace. The siege of Prague was ended after little more than a week and vast tracts of Bohemian lands have been seized by the Prussians.

War on the Danube: Decisive Russo-Austrian Victory

Ottoman soldiers were to be a crucial piece of the Prussian plan, marching north following news of Frederick's victory at Salzburg. The local Russo-Austrian Army was determined to prevent their advance, however. Ottoman attempts to link up with the Prussians were halted in a series of humiliating defeats, that left more than 8000 Ottoman soldiers dead. With their victory, the Russian-Austrian Army was even able to grab a bit more of Ottoman territory, leaving the border to the south secure for the damaged Habsburg domains.

Battle of Graz: Decisive French Victory

The French Army, ordered to come to the aid of their Austrian allies, decided to cross via Italy rather than Germany. Even neutral Venice, despite not being a part of the war, allowed the massive force to march through their lands. Upon emerging from the Alps, they found their allies in a state of crisis. With the Prussians expanding their control over the region and the shattered Austrian army not in the area, it was decided an attack must be immeadiately undertaken against the Prussians. The two armies assembled and did battle at the city of Graz. The French, outnumbering the Prussians almost two-to-one, were able to inflict a series of grievous wounds on the Prussian army, with the first large defeat inflicted on the Prussians in the War thus far. Frederick and his soldiers fled north, being expelled from Austria by the larger French force. This did not stop the Prussian King from setting up a garrison in Vienna, complete with supplies, and forcing the French to besiege the Austrian capitol. The situation in Central Europe remains highly uncertain.

Crimean Offensive: Major Crimean Victory

With the Russian Army in Crimea forced to withdraw in order to go quell the Cossack Rebellion, the Khanate of Crimea went on an immeadiate offensive. The Crimeans quickly retook all the seized land before expanding outwards, into Russian territory. Parts of the Ukraine were captured, as was Russian access to the Sea of Azov, with the small garrison of Russians there being surrounded and besieged by a larger Crimean force.

Battle of Tsaritsyn
: Slight Cossack Victory

The Cossacks were able to gather thousands to their banners, despite late attempts by Empress Elizabeth to begin reform. Thus, the Russian Army was forced to withdraw from Crimea and face off against the rabble. Unfortunately for the Empress, the local rebels knew the terrain far better than her army. After a series of indecisive skirmishes, the Cossacks attacked the full Russian Army at Tsaritsyn, catching them off guard and unaware. More than 10,000 Russian soldiers were killed in the chaos, with the Army fleeing north. While the Cossacks were victorious though, their rebellion has not yet managed to spread into the heartlands of Russia.


Casualties So Far:
41,297 Russians
32,225 Prussians
27,289 Austrians
25,271 French

13,850 Ottomans
13,031 British

13,000 Dutch
10,863 Danes
10,788 Swedes
9,050 Crimeans
8,420 Mughals

7,200 Bavarians
6,400 Cossacks
6,048 Irish
5,090 Sejmists
4,200 Saxons
3,500 Polish Royalists
2,933 Maratha
600 Huron

550 Portuguese

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Spamage
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« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2017, 01:25:17 AM »
« Edited: September 07, 2017, 01:28:15 AM by Spamage »

Jan-Jun 1758

Summary:
The Anglo-Prussian Alliance was able to land a series of decisive blows against their enemies. Frederick II won a double victory in Bohemia, the Danes were able to expel the Swedes from Norway, and the Jacobite Rebellion seems to have lost the wind in its sails. That being said, their record abroad was far more muddled and their opponents still have men to throw at them. Perhaps the tide could turn yet again...

European Theater:
Invasion of Dublin: Major British Victory

Despite their humiliation at Cork, the British government was determined to crush the Irish rebels. The Army of Ireland South was reinforced and sent back to the island. This time they moved on Dublin, quickly capturing the city despite the brave resistance of a few souls. This was followed in quick succession by the defeat of a rebel force in the area, allowing for much of the surrounding region to be recaptured.

Battle of Cavan: Decisive British Victory

The large British Army of Ireland North was able to smash through the less numerous rebel force in Cavan, breaking the stalemate. Thousands of Jacobites were killed in the fighting, including "Bonnie Prince Charlie" himself, though his father remains safely in exile. Regardless, the oxygen has been taken out of the Jacobite rebellion for the time being, much of the Kingdom being recaptured. Still, there do remain pockets of Irish resistance in the south and west which clearly intend to carry on the fight.

War in Norway: Decisive Danish Victory

The concerns of the Prussian soldiers in Norway were assuaged by the arrival of thousands more soldiers, led personally by Prince Henry of Prussia. These men joined the existing Danish-Prussian Army in a series of Battles against the invading Swedes. Despite clever Swedish manuevering, and the rising of several Norwegian nobles in their favor, they were decisively defeated, taking large casualties in the process. Due to this all of their gains in Norway thus far have been lost, the borders in this region now the same as at the begining of the conflict.  

Ottoman-Crimean Invasion of Ukraine: Decisive Ottoman Victory

With Catherine's decision to withdraw all of her garrisoned soldiers to go fight the Cossacks, the path north was clear for the Ottomans and their Crimean vassals. They faced little resistance as Ukraine quickly was seized, thousands of square miles changing hands. Even Kiev, a city of great significance in Russian history, was captured by the Ottomans despite the zealous resistance of a few brave souls.

War on the Danube: Slight Ottoman Victory

The Ottomans were pleased by the sudden withdrawal of the massive Russian Army, with many hoping to finally campaign in Habsburg lands. The soldiers of Wallachia and Moldavia dutifully arrived in addition to some sent from the Capitol, though by the time the Ottoman force was prepared the full Austrian Army now guarded the Danube, comitted to defending the territory they still held. Regardless, battle was joined and despite slightly superior numbers, the Austrians were pushed out of Ottoman lands, losing their gains in this region. Even so, they managed to prevent Ottoman incursions into either Hungary or Croatia (which some Austrian commanders have claimed to be a moral victory).

Battle of Liberec: Major Prussian Victory

The French rushed north following the events of 1757, hoping to cut off the two Prussian armies should they attempt to combine. As they marched, they faced very little resistance. Prague was found to have been quietly prepared for a siege, with still no Prussian Army in sight. Over-confident French commanders asserted that they'd be liberating Dresden within the year when they finally caught up to the Prussians at the small town of Liberec. Frederick's two armies, in a defensive position, faced against the French in far north Bohemia. The resulting battle was a bloodbath on both sides.

The French attempted to use their numerical superiority to seize the field, but faltered throughout the day. This, coupled with the successful employment of cannister rounds in the cannons of the Prussians, had the effect of producing far more French dead than Prussians. Demoralized, far from home, and tired the French Army withdrew in haste, fleeing south back into Austria. Some praised this as Frederick's finest momement, though these words were quickly silenced when word arrived of the approaching Russian force.

Battle of Prague: Decisive Prussian Victory

The Russians were forced to face the Prussians alone due to the French hasty move north earlier on. As a result, they numbered slightly less than the Prussian soldiers, though the two forces were roughly equal. The Battle of Prague was a rout, thousands of Russians being killed or wounded. It was Prussian discipline and superior equipment that carried the day, though the win rang hollow for some. The Russians were able to score a last laugh when Frederick II was wounded in the leg by a stray bullet. Though the King showed every sign of recovering, he was be unable to lead his forces in person for the next 6 months as he recuperated.

Cossack Rebellion: Major Cossack Victory

Catherine called the garrisons of the Empire to join her forces already assembled against the Cossacks. This substantial army made a large mistake however, greatly underestimating the number of their foes, as well as the support they enjoyed among the locals. After a series of misleading directions from local guides and ambushes, the two forces faced off in a series of battles. The Russians were unable to halt the followers of Ivan VI however, taking heavy casualties in the process. As they fled, more land was gained by the rebels.

Sardinian-Tuscan Invasion of Bavaria: Decisive Bavarian-Hanoverian Victory

The King of Sardinia launched an ambitious plan in concert with Emperor Francis' Tuscan soldiers, an invasion of the recent turncoat Bavaria. Crossing the Alps, the conditions initially looked favorable for his soldiers, who faced little initial resistance (calling themselves defenders of the "True Religion" helped). They were unaware however, that Bavaria was also the staging ground for the assembling of the soldiers of the minor German and Hanoverian forces. Thus, despite being the attackers, the Sardinians found themselves outnumbered. Their forces were quickly defeated, fleeing back into Tyrol and friendly territory.

Indian Theater:
Battle of Bengal: Slight French Victory

Despite British superiority in numbers, the French were determined not to see their hard-fought gains in the region lost. After a series of engagements the French managed not only to rout the British, but gain some territory as well.


North American Theater:
Second Invasion of Quebec: Stalemate

The British forces yet again marched out of Louisbourg, looking to break the stalemate in the region after several months of inaction. While they enjoyed some initial successes, they were unable to reach their target and were forced back in a series of skirmishes with French settlers. More than a thousand British perished, compared to around 500 Frenchmen.

Iroqouis-Wabnaki War: Stalemate

Fighting heated up between allies of the British (Iroqouis, Cherokee) and those of the French (Wabnaki, Seminole) in several areas of the New World during this period. While the Iroqouis-Wabnaki campaign resulted in a stalemate, the Cherokee were able to inflict a strong blow on the Seminoles and force them to stop harassing the British settlers in Florida.

Battle of the Mississippi: Stalemate

Despite French attempts to retake the region from the British, and British attempts to soldify their hold on the area, both powers were thwarted in their ambitions by yet another stalemate. Unlike in Quebec, here the attacking French lost more men than their British foes.


Casualties so far:
50,623 Russians
45,880 Austrians

42,913 French
41,684 Prussians
26,762 Swedes
24,766 Ottomans
19,692 British
16,051 Danes

13,000 Dutch
12,419 Irish
11,489 Mughals
10,318 Cossacks
9,050 Crimeans

8,000 Bavarians
5,977 Maratha
5,090 Sejmists
4,200 Saxons
3,500 Polish Royalists
1,270 Wabnaki
980 Iroqouis
600 Huron
550 Portuguese

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Spamage
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« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2017, 10:16:11 PM »

Jul-Dec 1758

Summary: Despite orders on both sides to keep the fighting civil, the War in Germany quickly turned brutal. With both Prussia and Austrian allies ordered to attempt to stop their opponents from combining their forces, skirmishes broke out almost everywhere. Local rivalries fueled intense and horrible crimes, while the Venetian aid expedition found itself ill equipped to deal with the vast number of injured civilians.

Meanwhile, the alliance of Prussia, the Ottomans, and Denmark have broken a key pledge in their treaty, assaulting Russia through the employment of mercenaries. How will France respond now that its former enemies have been shown to deal in bad faith?

European Theater:
German Subtheater
Battle of Oldenburg: Decisive Imperial League Victory

Fighting in northwest Germany was inaugurated with the joint Ostfriesland-Anhalt-Zerbst attack on Oldenburg. Their forces were soon reinforced by the arrival of thousands of troops from the west, a region in solid Imperial control. Oldenburg's local resistance collapsed fairly quickly, with the Imperial Army taking the city. They followed up on their victory by then suprising Bremen, which was unprepared for a siege and likewise surrendered.

War in Hesse-Kassel: Slight Imperial League Victory

Both sides sent large armies to central German as well. The German League was especially active in trying to scatter local Imperial forces before they could collect in Hesse-Kassel. A large army from Munster, Hesse-Darmstadt, Paderborn, and Westfalen (as well as several other Western areas such as Liege) faced off against the combined area forces of Hesse-Kassel, Braunschwieg, Gotha, and several other powers. The fighting was brutal, both sides taking heavy losses, and resulted in slight gains for the Imperial League, though both remain strong in the region.

Battle of the Palatine (Pfalz): Stalemate

With the Imperial League largely surrounding Pfalz, it was hoped the region would be easy pickings. Despite that, unlike the Imperial soldiers, the Pfalzmen (?) were able to assemble much more rapidly. In a series of skirmishes, Imperial invasions by Trier, Nassau, and Zweibrucken were pushed back by the determined locals.

Battle of Ansbach: Decisive German League Victory

The several cities around Ansbach attempted to launch an invasion of that principality, but were forcefully rebuffed. In fact, following victory in the Battle of Ansbach, their soldiers stormed Nurnburg and Rothenburg, taking a bit of Bramberg's land as well. The remainder of the Imperial allies to the north of Bavaria sit dangerously vulnerable following these advances.

Invasion of Hohenzollern/Wurttemburg: Decisive Imperial League Victory

Baden displayed its treachery by quickly accepting an offer from Francis of Lorraince, agreeing to switch sides in return for the title of Grand Duke as well as one of the vacant Electorate titles. This left Wurtemburg and tiny Hohenzollern surrounded by hostile powers. Furtemsburg, Bresigau, Kempten and the numerous other small states swarmed the region. The timely arrival of the Sardinians further helped the situation. Within several weeks Stuttgart and the the Ducal Family of Wurttemburg were both captured, with the Duke himself fleeing to Prussia in disguise.

Second Battle of Graz/Liberation of Vienna: Decisive Austrian Victories

The Anglo-German Army stormed out of Bavaria, seeking to push into Tyrol and then south towards Croatia. There was a surprising absence however, with the King of Bavaria ordering his soldiers to stay in his realm. "We have lost enough men in this bloody war!" he was alleged to have exclaimed, though some were suspicious of other motives. As a consequence, the Hanoverian force was not as numerous as planned.

Nevertheless, they combined with the Royal Army of Prussia, led by Prince Henry, and faced off against the Austrian forces. Much to the surprise of the Prussians, Spanish soldiers were in the ranks of the Austrian Army, they having "volunteered" to help their fellow Catholics. While Prince Henry was a formidable leader, the Austrians held the advantage of terrain, experience, and local knowledge. The Prussians attempted to overcome this during the Second Battle of Graz, but the entire operation collapsed when Prince Henry was killed by a stray bullet in the midst of the fighting. Morale in the Prussian lines collapsed, the men fleeing north to Bohemia, leaving even Vienna largely undefended in the crisis. Thousands of men fell to vengeful Austrians in the chaotic retreat towards Prague.

While there was a scanty guard in Austria's capitol, the people of the city ensured it would amount to nothing. Within the span of several hours a mass uprising evicted the occupiers from the city, a Habsburg flag flying in Vienna once more. The Prussian Army remains nominally intact though, and in the area, so it is clear the war will likely continue.


Irish Subtheater
Battle of Limerick: Decisive British Victory

The remaining Jacobites in Ireland were tired, demoralized, and low in number as the British Army came in for the kill. While there was token resistance to their arms, occuring at Limerick, the remaining rebel forces were easily crushed by the British Army. The Jacobites have scattered to the wind, as Britain reassumes total control of Ireland for the first time since the uprisings of early 1757. There was widespread celebration in London upon hearing the news.

Russian Subtheater
Landings in Estonia: Major Polish Victory

The Prussian-Ottoman-Danish hired Swiss mercenaries, dubbed the "Russian Liberation Army" were hired by the allies and ordered to land in Estonia, which had been recently handed over to Polish control. When word reached the local commanders of the arrival of the Swiss, the local garrisons and men en route to Russia took action. The landing sites were stormed, thousands of Swiss being killed in the fighting along the shore. The remainder of the mercenaries either surrendered, or fled back out to the Baltic, landing in Pommerania.

Swedish Invasion of Riga: Major Swedish Victory

The city of Riga, unlike Estonia, was largely undefended (it having remained in Russian hands following the transfer of Estonia and Upper Lithuania). As a result, when a Swedish fleet (ostensibly Russian allies) showed up carrying a sizeable army, the people were unsure what to think. By the time it became clear they were actively seizing the territory, the city falling quickly, it was too late. While locals in some areas have resisted, others welcome a return to Swedish control of the Baltic, especially with the civil wars continuing to simmer across Russia.

Cossack Rebellion: Major Russian Victory

Recalling her men from Bohemia, and reorganizing the armies for good measure, Catherine was able to take the fight to her enemies. The first major battle occured in southern Russia, where the Cossacks were attempting to rapidly seize territories recently vacated by the Ottomans. In a show of brutal effectiveness, the forces of Ivan VI were crushed, the Russian firepower ripping through their lines and forcing a retreat. While the Cossacks entered the fight with morale and spirits high, the sheer size of the defeat has many questioning whether success can really be achieved with their first major push backwards.

Peter III's Rebellion: Decisive Petrine Victory

While the Cossacks were dealt a serious blow to the south, the Russian-Polish Army sent to fight Peter III faced isues from the outset. Thousands of peasants, workers, and middle-class Russians had joined his banners following his decrees, though he remained outnumbered by Catherine's men. Even so, perhaps drawing from the example of Frederick of Prussia (his idol), Peter III was able to lead his forces to victory. Catherine's men were pushed back and in the chaos, the old capitol of Moscow was captured by the rebels, where Peter was quickly coronated in St. Basil's Cathedral. His rebellion has strengthened, overshadowing that of the Cossacks, but he now has two enemy armies in the area, one fresh from a victory against the Cossacks.

Battle of Viborg: Decisive Swedish Victory

In a second surprise move, the Swedes undertook a direct assault on Russia via Finland. Their main army entered the Empire, moving straight for St. Petersburg as the locals attempted to gather a force to face them. The small Russian "army" was crushed by the Swedes, who advanced directly on the Capitol, starting up a siege. Catherine and Paul managed to escape before their arrival however, fleeing to safer territory elsewhere. While the city is holding out, aid will be needed if it is to be kept from falling.



Casualties so Far:
59,723 Russians
59,684 Prussians
49,080 Austrians
42,913 French

35,029 Swedes
26,410 German League Minors
25,266 Ottomans
24,909 British

19,088 Imperial League Minors
16,718 Cossacks
16,051 Danes
14,649 Irish
13,000 Dutch
11,489 Mughals
9,050 Crimeans
8,000 Bavarians
5,977 Maratha
5,180 Poles
5,080 Sejmists
4,200 Saxons
1270 Wabnaki
980 Iroqouis
600 Huron
550 Portuguese


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