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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  Colorado 2004-2008
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Author Topic: Colorado 2004-2008  (Read 947 times)
Arbitrage1980
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« on: September 15, 2016, 12:36:42 pm »

The movement was stunning.  CO was a rock solid GOP state; Bush won it by more than 4% in 2004 but Obama won it by nearly 9% in 2008.  Was there a huge latino and millennial surge in 2008?
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Buffalo Bill
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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2016, 01:13:37 pm »

The movement was stunning.  CO was a rock solid GOP state; Bush won it by more than 4% in 2004 but Obama won it by nearly 9% in 2008.  Was there a huge latino and millennial surge in 2008?

Never was CO a rock solid GOP state and neither was VA.  It's a far left conception construed into spinning their fairy tale that everything is sliding their way.  CO voted for Clinton in 1992 and slightly for Dole in 1996.  Other than 2000, it's been pretty competitive in the last several elections.  If you want to go back to the 80's that's fine.  The deep south was once solidly Democrat following the Civil War too.  CO has been purple for some time now.  VA has been sliding to the left each election since 1996.  Even from 1952-2004, VA wasn't too far center-right.
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‼realJohnEwards‼
MatteKudasai
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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2016, 01:26:02 pm »

The movement was stunning.  CO was a rock solid GOP state; Bush won it by more than 4% in 2004 but Obama won it by nearly 9% in 2008.  Was there a huge latino and millennial surge in 2008?

Never was CO a rock solid GOP state and neither was VA.  It's a far left conception construed into spinning their fairy tale that everything is sliding their way.  CO voted for Clinton in 1992 and slightly for Dole in 1996.  Other than 2000, it's been pretty competitive in the last several elections.  If you want to go back to the 80's that's fine.  The deep south was once solidly Democrat following the Civil War too.  CO has been purple for some time now.  VA has been sliding to the left each election since 1996.  Even from 1952-2004, VA wasn't too far center-right.
The thing is, VA has been trending left even as its western part has veered hard right. McCain hit 60 or 70 percent in much of the western half; meanwhile, Obama took Fairfax by 20 points, where Clinton lost it, albeit narrowly. As America grows more urban and rural areas bleed population, this bodes well for the Democrats.
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Buffalo Bill
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« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2016, 01:40:46 pm »

The movement was stunning.  CO was a rock solid GOP state; Bush won it by more than 4% in 2004 but Obama won it by nearly 9% in 2008.  Was there a huge latino and millennial surge in 2008?

Never was CO a rock solid GOP state and neither was VA.  It's a far left conception construed into spinning their fairy tale that everything is sliding their way.  CO voted for Clinton in 1992 and slightly for Dole in 1996.  Other than 2000, it's been pretty competitive in the last several elections.  If you want to go back to the 80's that's fine.  The deep south was once solidly Democrat following the Civil War too.  CO has been purple for some time now.  VA has been sliding to the left each election since 1996.  Even from 1952-2004, VA wasn't too far center-right.
The thing is, VA has been trending left even as its western part has veered hard right. McCain hit 60 or 70 percent in much of the western half; meanwhile, Obama took Fairfax by 20 points, where Clinton lost it, albeit narrowly. As America grows more urban and rural areas bleed population, this bodes well for the Democrats.

Democrats bleeding into northern VA from DC will do that.  By bleed I mean move.
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‼realJohnEwards‼
MatteKudasai
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« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2016, 03:02:58 pm »

The movement was stunning.  CO was a rock solid GOP state; Bush won it by more than 4% in 2004 but Obama won it by nearly 9% in 2008.  Was there a huge latino and millennial surge in 2008?

Never was CO a rock solid GOP state and neither was VA.  It's a far left conception construed into spinning their fairy tale that everything is sliding their way.  CO voted for Clinton in 1992 and slightly for Dole in 1996.  Other than 2000, it's been pretty competitive in the last several elections.  If you want to go back to the 80's that's fine.  The deep south was once solidly Democrat following the Civil War too.  CO has been purple for some time now.  VA has been sliding to the left each election since 1996.  Even from 1952-2004, VA wasn't too far center-right.
The thing is, VA has been trending left even as its western part has veered hard right. McCain hit 60 or 70 percent in much of the western half; meanwhile, Obama took Fairfax by 20 points, where Clinton lost it, albeit narrowly. As America grows more urban and rural areas bleed population, this bodes well for the Democrats.

Democrats bleeding into northern VA from DC will do that.  By bleed I mean move.
Yeah... exactly. Cities like DC, Raleigh and Atlanta are growing, and many of these new occupants are young and well-educated. Meanwhile, many rural counties are losing population, to emigration or to other causes.
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Buffalo Bill
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« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2016, 03:14:03 pm »

The movement was stunning.  CO was a rock solid GOP state; Bush won it by more than 4% in 2004 but Obama won it by nearly 9% in 2008.  Was there a huge latino and millennial surge in 2008?

Never was CO a rock solid GOP state and neither was VA.  It's a far left conception construed into spinning their fairy tale that everything is sliding their way.  CO voted for Clinton in 1992 and slightly for Dole in 1996.  Other than 2000, it's been pretty competitive in the last several elections.  If you want to go back to the 80's that's fine.  The deep south was once solidly Democrat following the Civil War too.  CO has been purple for some time now.  VA has been sliding to the left each election since 1996.  Even from 1952-2004, VA wasn't too far center-right.
The thing is, VA has been trending left even as its western part has veered hard right. McCain hit 60 or 70 percent in much of the western half; meanwhile, Obama took Fairfax by 20 points, where Clinton lost it, albeit narrowly. As America grows more urban and rural areas bleed population, this bodes well for the Democrats.

Democrats bleeding into northern VA from DC will do that.  By bleed I mean move.
Yeah... exactly. Cities like DC, Raleigh and Atlanta are growing, and many of these new occupants are young and well-educated. Meanwhile, many rural counties are losing population, to emigration or to other causes.

It's definitely evened things out in the eastern part of the south.  Hopefully we'll get someone in office who can speak to millennials and southern conservatives in addressing moderation. 
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Southern Delegate Spark
Spark498
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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2016, 07:47:13 pm »

I might add that Bill Clinton only won the state once in 1992. He lost it in 1996 to Dole. So CO is not in Hillary's column just yet.
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Make America Malarkey Free Again
xingkerui
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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2016, 09:53:55 pm »

Colorado wasn't a rock solid GOP state in the early 2000s; it was a Lean GOP state that Democrats had largely ignored at the Presidential level. The fact that it trended sharply Democratic in 2004 (Bush's margin shrunk by nearly 4%, despite his nearly 3% improvement nationwide), and the fact that Ken Salazar was elected that year shows that Colorado's Democratic trend is what caused Obama to target the state, not the other way around. What made Colorado trend especially sharply Democratic in 2008 was Obama's popularity there, his superior ground game, and his improvements among Latinos and young voters.
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