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  Talk Elections
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  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  Why do the Dakota State Capitals Vote Republican?
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Author Topic: Why do the Dakota State Capitals Vote Republican?  (Read 994 times)
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badger
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« on: August 07, 2016, 03:56:19 pm »

(Paging BRTD).

Generally, counties with state capitals in them tend to vote more Democratic than the state as a whole, in part due to government workers whom, even in conservative states, are more likely to either be unionized, or at very least fear cuts in government spending.

I've noticed the Dakota counties with their state capitals (Burleigh in ND, Hughes in SD) are heavily Republican even by those (Atlas) blue states' standards. Anyone know why?
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Bandit3 the Worker
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« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2016, 04:21:35 pm »

Another example is Missouri.
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cinyc
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2016, 05:00:30 pm »

Pierre isn't much of a city.  It's a small town.  Small towns tend to vote Republican.  Plus, the state political establishment in both Dakotas is largely Republican.  And Republicans tend to hire Republicans.
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TDAS04
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« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2016, 05:08:45 pm »
« Edited: August 07, 2016, 05:18:06 pm by TDAS04 »

For one thing, Pierre is tiny.  Also, Both Pierre and Bismarck are in remote areas west of the more populated (and liberal) farming, eastern edges of the Dakotas.  Bismarck is similar in size and politics to Rapid City, and both are pretty isolated.  Here in South Dakota, once you get west of the James River to the western two-thirds of the state, it becomes more wild, western, ranching country.

  
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giving birth to thunder
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2016, 10:32:34 pm »

For the record, there are relatively Democratic areas in Bismarck just south of the capitol where I'd imagine most of the state employees live. Obama won two precincts in Bismarck, one just south of the capitol grounds, the other south of that (which is the downtown area), McCain also didn't do that well in the surrounding areas, he got about 51% total in all those precincts, probably about 55% Romney victory. Still pretty strong, but not on the level of the county.

For Bismarck the name is actually a bit of a key. It's a heavily German as opposed to Scandinavian city, and was never an agricultural center, its economy aside from the state government has mostly been based around ranching, mineral extraction, oil refining, banking and health care. The state government employs about 4000 people, its the largest employer in the city, but the whole Bismarck metro now has over 100k people. Scandinavian agrian populism was never a thing there. And most of Bismarck's growth (which has been rapid since the 80s, long pre-oil boom) was from people moving there from economically unviable surrounding small towns, some of them German-speaking (though it's their kids now, the German speakers are mostly all in nursing homes), a very Republican demographic. Thanks to its isolation and how it developed Bismarck is also a city where churches were able to push a very socially conservative agenda that still has a lot of influence, the liberal ELCA associated with the Dakotas is actually fairly outnumbered by far more conservative Lutherans, the Catholic church and the Jesus Camp people combined. And it's an isolated low crime city where people outdoors recreation and hunting, there's guns everywhere and no one is really concerned about gun violence, attitudes toward guns there are more like what you'd find in a city 1/10 of its size. Both the demographics are culture are the sort of thing that would lead to being pretty conservative.

Also worth of note: Despite also being the second largest city in the state, Bismarck doesn't have a public state university. So kids from there go to school in either Fargo, Grand Forks or Minnesota. And the liberal ones are probably more likely to stay where they went (like me!)
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whitesox130
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2016, 09:39:19 pm »

Sangamon County, IL (Springfield) is probably more Republican than downstate as a whole.
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Bismarck
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« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2016, 10:28:34 pm »

For one thing, Pierre is tiny.  Also, Both Pierre and Bismarck are in remote areas west of the more populated (and liberal) farming, eastern edges of the Dakotas.  Bismarck is similar in size and politics to Rapid City, and both are pretty isolated.  Here in South Dakota, once you get west of the James River to the western two-thirds of the state, it becomes more wild, western, ranching country.

  

You mean relatively? The eastern portions of the Dakotas vote republican too.
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Cubby
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« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2016, 11:49:01 pm »

For one thing, Pierre is tiny.  Also, Both Pierre and Bismarck are in remote areas west of the more populated (and liberal) farming, eastern edges of the Dakotas.  Bismarck is similar in size and politics to Rapid City, and both are pretty isolated.  Here in South Dakota, once you get west of the James River to the western two-thirds of the state, it becomes more wild, western, ranching country.


You mean relatively? The eastern portions of the Dakotas vote republican too.

Not in 1996 or 2008
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TDAS04
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« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2016, 03:51:33 pm »

For one thing, Pierre is tiny.  Also, Both Pierre and Bismarck are in remote areas west of the more populated (and liberal) farming, eastern edges of the Dakotas.  Bismarck is similar in size and politics to Rapid City, and both are pretty isolated.  Here in South Dakota, once you get west of the James River to the western two-thirds of the state, it becomes more wild, western, ranching country.

  

You mean relatively? The eastern portions of the Dakotas vote republican too.

Yes, I'm meant more liberal than the the more western parts of the Dakotas.
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