Fear and Loathing in 72’ – The Election Game (GM Vacancy)
       |           

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 07, 2021, 08:41:58 AM

  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  Election What-ifs? (Moderators: #CriminalizeSobriety, Dereich)
  Fear and Loathing in 72’ – The Election Game (GM Vacancy)
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 37 38 39 40 41 [42] 43 44 45 46 47 ... 51
Author Topic: Fear and Loathing in 72’ – The Election Game (GM Vacancy)  (Read 90101 times)
Classic Conservative
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 5,647


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1025 on: January 31, 2016, 08:54:23 PM »

If someone wants to be Rarick just PM me and you can but if not I will be Rarick too!!
Logged
tmthforu94
Atlas Politician
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 22,309
United States


Political Matrix
E: 2.97, S: -1.57

P P P
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1026 on: January 31, 2016, 08:54:43 PM »

I am afraid I do not have the time available that I did last fall. I will be cheering from the sidelines. Best of luck to everyone. Smiley
Logged
/
darthebearnc
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 7,373
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1027 on: January 31, 2016, 08:58:18 PM »

ah, memories
Logged
Kingpoleon
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 21,935
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1028 on: January 31, 2016, 09:02:43 PM »

I'm willing to be a running-mate. Maybe Rockefeller or Ford for Nixon, Bayh for Muskie, or Rarick/whoever for Schmitz.
Logged
/
darthebearnc
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 7,373
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1029 on: January 31, 2016, 09:04:48 PM »

By the way, everyone, my running mate is already selected. He/she will be announced soon. Smiley
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1030 on: January 31, 2016, 09:05:44 PM »

I am afraid I do not have the time available that I did last fall. I will be cheering from the sidelines. Best of luck to everyone. Smiley

Sad to hear, Tmth, I was looking forward to your schedules!

Obviously, Senator Bayh remains Muskie's running mate, so YPestis needs to find a player for him as well.

By the way, everyone, my running mate is already selected. He/she will be announced soon. Smiley

Excellent! Please remember to nominate a VP for Congress too, I want to simulate that as well.
Logged
Slow Learner
Battenberg
Jr. Member
***
Posts: 1,023
United Kingdom


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1031 on: February 01, 2016, 08:08:17 AM »

I wouldn't mind being Bayh.
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1032 on: February 01, 2016, 12:38:55 PM »

I've been informed NeverAgain will play Bayh, leaving Rarick to be selected and Nixon's running mate to be announced, along with additional candidates or surrogates (former players are of course invited to play as their former candidates as surrogates if they wish).

If the forum has not collapsed later this evening, General Election rules and gameplay will be up.
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1033 on: February 04, 2016, 06:43:44 PM »

Bump! I still need both Nixon's VP and the Rarick player to be announced.
Logged
Classic Conservative
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 5,647


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1034 on: February 06, 2016, 06:31:30 PM »

I will be playing as Rarick
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1035 on: February 06, 2016, 10:09:00 PM »


Noted!

Dar, you're up, I can post the rules and get things sorted as soon as I know who the GOP running mate will be.
Logged
Classic Conservative
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 5,647


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1036 on: February 08, 2016, 11:30:05 AM »

Bump
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1037 on: February 11, 2016, 11:50:25 PM »

Dar has settled on a VP for the GE and a temporary appointment as well, and he has asked until tomorrow to make the formal announcements. Beyond that, I will not wait. In the meantime, here are our basic rules for Phase Three of the game: the 1972 General Election:

General Election Rules:


1. Turns: The General Election will be covered in nine playable turns, plus the special of Election Night 72’ (which might be interactive to some degree). The first eight turns cover a week each, and the final turn covers the final week of the presidential race, spanning from the 1st of September to the 7th of November. Each turn lasts 72 hours, which I may extend for 24 hours if absolutely necessary.

2. Debates: We will have three debates for this phase, two presidential ones (Turns 2 and 7) and one for the Vice-Presidential nominees (Turn 5). All campaigns are invited, but candidates are free to attend as they wish. Each debate will have an opening and closing statement, and three issues to be discussed, with each candidate having a right to up to two rebuttals to other candidates. After the end, I will assign points to each candidate on each part of the debate, and roll the dice to assign you a performance level (from one to six, to simulate whether the candidates were in top form or not).

3. Schedules: The schedules remain basically the same as in the primaries, with the exception of fundraising, as it makes no sense to raise money at this moment. Your actions are the obvious ones for campaigning, or to use the media through interviews, press conferences and campaign ads. The Nixon and Muskie campaigns can run a max. of 3 TV, Newspaper or Radio ads per turn, the Schmitz campaign is limited to two (which cannot be both from TV, to reflect the lesser funds of an independent campaign against the big parties).

4. Polling: Well, each turn brings a national poll; with players being allowed to request four state polls each turn (that makes for twelve each turn). I will have the real numbers on the ground carefully noted down, but each poll will be released with a margin of error of up to 3%. It’s no Dewey beats Truman, but it should add a sense of uncertainty.

As you can see, fairly simple. As soon as I have those announcements I will post a race analysis of the primaries, a write-up of the July-August events, and begin Turn Seventeen.
Logged
/
darthebearnc
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 7,373
Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1038 on: February 12, 2016, 08:24:06 PM »

The Nixon Campaign - Announcement Regarding the Vice Presidency


President Nixon addresses the nation as he reveals his nomination for the Vice Presidency and his choice for his running mate on the GOP ticket in November.

"Hello, America. Today, I address you with both joy in my heart and anticipation on my mind, with both happiness and hope for the future.

Today, America faces some of the greatest challenges it ever has. With a war raging in Indochina a number of domestic issues that affect all within our nation's borders, it is more important now than it has been ever before that we have strong, stable, and sincere leadership on the federal level. Under the Nixon Administration, America has seen a great recovery and resurgence in glory, with the economy rebounding at historic proportions, foreign relations improving steadily with many of the world's great powers abroad, and confidence in the strength of the American Dream higher than it possibly ever has before. As your President, I am honored to have served this nation during such a beautiful period of growth and prosperity, and for that I will be eternally grateful. Just shortly ago, in fact, the people of our great nation placed their trust in me once more, allowing me to recapture my party's presidential nomination with the support of all fifty states and an overwhelming percentage of the popular vote.

However, our Administration must take further action to ensure that we can be effective in our governing as successfully and as prudently as possible. The recent resignation of Vice President Agnew mandates a temporary appointment for the office of the Vice President of the United States, and it is with joy, not remorse, hope, not fear, and delight, not regret, that I come to the American people today with my decision.

Governor William Scranton showed us through his time in office that he is a capable, honest, and faithful leader worthy of our trust and respect. While Governor of Pennsylvania, Mr. Scranton passed proactive, common-sense, and bipartisan reform that boosted his state's economy, saved his state's public education system, and made Pennsylvania once more one of the greatest states in the Union. During his tenure, Governor Scranton proved to not just the people of his state but to the American people that he is a man capable of leading a nation, and it is for this reason that I hereby nominate him for the office of Vice President of the United States to serve the remainder of Vice President Agnew's term. I and the American people trust that Governor Scranton will not just meet but excel at the requirements of his office, and I look forward to working with him over the course of the next year in order to ensure that the progress made by the Nixon Administration is maintained and furthered to the maximum extent possible.

However, Governor Scranton has opted not to seek a full term as Vice President, and has decided that he does not wish to appear on our party's ticket this November. Both he and I agree that there is another capable leader willing to take the mantle of the Vice Presidency for a full four years - a leader that has and will continue to transcend the boundaries of partisanship in order to best fulfill the interests of the American people. Throughout his long and admirable political career, this leader has worked tirelessly and across the aisle to improve the lives of the people of his city and his state as much as he possibly could, and his success in doing so makes him one of America's most admired politicians among both Republicans and Democrats, among both men and women, among both blacks and whites, among both the young and the old, and among those who wish to see a more prosperous and a more beautiful future for all in our great nation.

In this time of great urgency both at home and abroad, nothing is more important among the people of our nation than to come together - to unite in our calls for a brighter future, to unite in our opposition to a common enemy, and to unite in our desire for a better America. As shown throughout my first term in office, politics works at its best when we can come together to get things done, when we can unite instead of divide, and we can agree to work tirelessly and with full effort to help the American people strive.

It is because of this, America, that I take the great honor of being able to nominate Sam Yorty for the vice presidential spot on our party's ticket this November. Throughout his time as Mayor of Los Angeles, Mr. Yorty has proven to the American people that he is an effective leader capable of governing with honesty, rectitude, and integrity - all values which I believe I have seen him treasure possibly more than any other person I know. Mayor Yorty knows what it takes to lead effectively, and to be honest, America, I trust him with my life.

This election is about more than mere partisanship. This election is about working together to get things done, and it is about knowing that some things matter more than simple party labels. This election is about uniting people behind a common goal, and that goal is to create an America in which our children, our children's children, and their children too can look back and thank us for what we've done.

Thank you, Governor Scranton and Mayor Yorty. And thank you, America."
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1039 on: February 12, 2016, 08:29:58 PM »

Excellent.

I'm writing the analysis and the July-August events as we speak. Expect turn Seventeen tonight or tomorrow, the GE finally moves on!
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1040 on: February 12, 2016, 11:44:46 PM »

The GOP Primary:


Having barely won 1968’ by mounting an unlikely comeback and riding the wave of his so called “Silent Majority”, Richard Milhouse Nixon was in for a rocky term, one in which the fundamental questions plaguing America were often answered with the politics of blame. Inflation? The Gold Standard to blame, and the Nixon shock to save the economy. Vietnam? Lack of patriotism and communist inhumanity, of course, and we have good Kissinger to secure peace with honor. Race issues? Breakdown of law and order, not to be tolerated. And the list goes on and on… Pragmatic to an extreme, Nixon was one of the few figures able to keep his party together, and the strain had begun to show by early 1972 as his policies had brought the anger of the GOP wings. Alas, a steady approval rating led the liberal and conservative heavyweights refusing to challenge the President of the United States, leaving Nixon to fend off supposedly minor challengers in and out of the party.

Bombastic Congressman John Schmitz bolted the party early on to lead his unlikely quest to galvanize conservatives, and the candidacies of businessman Howard Morgens and Congressman John Ashbrook fell early on. The task of bringing down the giant came then to the heir of another giant slayer: Barry Goldwater Jr. The young Congressman put his hat on the ring, and soon enough the Goldwaterites had mounted a grassroots operation that put them at almost at 40% on the early Arizona caucus, earning Morgens’s endorsement. Barrymentum led into February as New Hampshire approached, and Richard Nixon went into China. The insurgent campaign, leading with a strange mixture of liberal and conservative stands on policy, pushed Nixon into making a move he had avoided since 1960’: to debate Goldwater on national TV. To the shock of many, Nixon decisively routed Goldwater when the challenger infamously supported amnesty, and prevented a crisis. Nixon defeated Goldwater 66 to 33%.

Still, the result was enough to push the contest forward, and Goldwater moved ahead, portraying himself as a champion of integrity and character against the more pragmatic and cold incumbent, winning over the Buckley brothers and causing major conservatives like Ronald Reagan and Storm Thurmond to doubt Nixon. The President, realizing the time had come, went in full force on the trial, making a case strong enough to win a larger landslide in the decisive Florida contest. Being anointed as a true challenger on the media as Nixon shot himself in the foot with a surreal nuclear war ad, Goldwater went towards the March caucuses, believing them – especially South Carolina, where he led the polls – his breakaway stage. Yet for all the enthusiasm, Nixon was on top his game as he had ever been, and his almost unlimited resources yielded what they promised. Despite fighting his way through March and April and winning a sizable bloc of delegates, Goldwater Jr. got close, but lost the entire set of contests. On mid-April, his campaign was suspended.

The still sizable bloc of Goldwaterites aside, Nixon went onto winning every single caucus and primary, entering June with the wind sailing on his back as his delegate lead was absolute and the Democratic Party tore itself apart brutally. Alas, Nixon’s mistake back in 68’ came to haunt him for a final time: Vice-President Spiro Agnew. A divisive figure and conservative darling, Agnew had not been active on the trail against Goldwater Jr., and Nixon neither trusted him nor thought him capable of being President. Yet removing him, a man so popular with a base distrustful of its president, would make the RNC a confusing mess. Agnew, amusingly enough, removed himself from the stage. The likely 76’ nominee was found to have taken bribes as Governor of Maryland, and Haldeman and Nixon hardly waited seconds to pull the plug. "Goodnight, sweet prince", General Al Haig was heard to mock as Agnew left the White House via helicopter.

That left a complicated matter for Nixon. Perhaps knowing John Connally to be unable to make it through the Senate and unwilling to run for Vice-President, Nixon decided to take a two sides approach on one of the most shockingly cynical gambits in American political history. Nominating William Scranton as his placeholder VP he ensured a mostly smooth confirmation (as most democrats acknowledged him to be qualified and moderate enough), and then he completed his masterstroke right before the RNC. Because Nixon would attempt to ride the conservative wave of angry voters with the boldest of picks: Sam Yorty.
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1041 on: February 13, 2016, 12:19:19 AM »

The Democratic Primary:


With a brand new primary system in place - courtesy of George McGovern - after the 1968 madness, people expected the nomination process to be more orderly and more democratic. Their second wish was granted, but the first... turned out to be the most gloriously chaotic field in living memory. As 1972, that was not supposed to be. Having spent 1971 rising as the establishment champion and the man to defeat Richard Nixon, Senator Ed Muskie benefited from the refusal to run from HHH and Ted Kennedy, and shot to the top of the polls. Following him was ambitious and young Mayor Lindsay of New York, the second act of Gene McCarthy, challengers McGovern, Gravel, Carter, Chisholm and of course, a bombastic Mayor from California... To the primary season's merit, the first caucuses (Iowa and Arizona), having gained some public notoriety before New Hampshire, confirmed Muskie and Lindsay's place as the frontunners, and opened the ground to the rise of other candidates.

February turned into insanity, of course, as riots and terrorist plots brought forward issues like law and order, anger, disappointment, and a massive source of energy nobody was very much interested in. No one except Sam Yorty, of course. Striking an alliance with William Loeb and taking full advantage of George Wallace's initial refusal to run for the primary, Yorty ably navigated the waters of the field as Muskie was steadily undermined, crafting the most unlikely upset as the Mayor sent the Senator into second, with the rising McGovern shocking with a third. As Florida and Illinois kicked in the the field had changed, leading to the end of the Carter and Chisholm campaigns as fiery populist Fred Harris had entered the race to arrive to the top tier. Weakened and bleeding support, Muskie saw his numbers drop as John Lindsay won both primaries to become the new savior, the man that was now the challenger to Nixon in November. Before he could be challenged from his spot, John Lindsay's meteoric rise ended on a tragic plane crash.

Devoid of a frontrunner, and with Muskie unable to retake a firm grasp of the issue... much strife ensued. Mike Gravel and Gene McCarthy were forced out of the race, and McGovern, Harris and Yorty all found themselves with a shot at the nomination themselves. It was so that a frantic schedule of caucuses and primaries followed through the grueling slog of April and May, as the state of the field forced George Wallace and Mo Udall to make surprise entrances of their own. Alas, none of them managed to knock out their consolidated rivals, with only Udall making him out to the DNC. All candidates, it seemed, had flaws that they failed to overcome. Fred Harris was blasted repeatedly on busing and never took command, McGovern could not counter "Acid, Abortion and Amnesty" and could not sail away. It was against them that Sam Yorty's rise with working class voters grew steadier and steadier, his political organization turning into a grassroots machine that outsmarted left wing volunteers into seizing a party that was supposed to turn leftwards in 72'.

More than once people thought Ed Muskie was finally dead and put down, and more than once it was said that the Senator had no choice but to withdraw. Alas, a narrative of redemption was on the making. Confessing his mistakes and hardened by a long primary, from the ashes of the old Muskie a better candidate was on the making, steadily winning momentum, debates, and delegates to be a choice to save the party. Center and left divided, Yorty took away California, the unions and the crucial Wallace support, and stormed at the gates of the DNC with over a thousand delegates. Not trusting their primary candidates any longer, the big beasts like Bayh, Jackson and Smathers stepped in as the ballots repeated, a brokered convention and a divided party in full display.

What ensued there could easily be the subject of a book, and indeed, one will struggle to find a better account than that of journalist Hunter Thompson, who emerged out of that battle with a blackened eye and a sharper prose. It was finally evident that most of the party would not or could not stomach Saigon Sam as their nominee, and the unlikely and unholy alliance of those who had previously been at each other's throats ended as anti-Yorty forces coalesced behind Ed Muskie, the man who had returned from political death. As a disgusted Yorty and the conservatives walked out of the DNC, Muskie picked Senator Bayh in a successful gamble to restore unity, and emerged with a candidacy that, while weakened and far behind Richard Nixon still had a shot at victory following the Agnew scandal.

While fearing Yorty to endorse Nixon, Muskie, Bayh and the Democratic establishment were still unprepared for what was to come.
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1042 on: February 13, 2016, 01:06:23 AM »

July-August 1972


Gerald Ford: Nixon did what?
Ronald Reagan: Exactly.

To say that the Grand Old Party was surprised would be to make an understatement. Oh, sure, people were sure Sam Yorty would make an appearance and endorse the GOP ticket, and they would gleefully watch the Muskie/Bayh ticket spiral into colapse as they won the well-deserved landslide. They all expected that. They also thought Nixon capable of nominating a conservative Democrat for Vice-President and were more or less resigned to seeing Connally joining their side. But what they never considered as a possibility was for Nixon to take the supreme gamble, and nominate the other conservative democrat. And as William Scranton packed and went to the Senate to go through his Confirmation hearing, the nation learned that Saigon Sam was going to be Nixon's running mate.

That Sam Yorty got through the RNC was a testament to both Nixon and Yorty's skills, and the pragmatic nature Republicans had learned to adapt from their President. Immediately as the pick was announced no effort was spared to sell the Mayor to a stunned public, arguing that Yorty was a principled conservative, abandoned by an extremist party and their best chance of winning enough votes to make Muskie nonviable from the start. Those supporters went further still, pointing out Yorty's endorsement of Nixon in 60' and 68', and the rumour that Nixon himself had asked the Mayor to turn Republican back in 65'. The President's men, conservatives and loyalists alike were on side. On the other hand, many pointed out Yorty had started his own campaign describing Nixon as a failure...

Disunited in shock were Agnew loyalists, the Goldwaterites, the Rockefeller Republicans who shuddered at the thought of Yorty in the White House, who believe they had better men for the job. It wasn't a surprise, therefore, that delegates put names like Reagan, Rockefeller, Connally, Percy, Ford or Goldwater Jr on the ballot for VP, even as the men themselves denied any interest in a coup. Time was not on their side, and neither was the horde of Nixon loyalist delegates, both eager to please the President and scared the hell out of Haldeman and company. Sure enough, Nixon was renominated with almost 96% of the delegate vote, and Yorty, while seeing defections to the would-be challengers, still got about 70% of the delegate enough, surviving his first test. With no time, no interest, no chance to rebel, the party saw Yorty give another of his fiery speeches, a tirade against all negative associated with Muskie, a call for that rising tide of angry voters to go for the GOP as the right choice.

If polling taken before the RNC showed Nixon with a lead ahead of Muskie due to disunity countering the Agnew scandal, the whole scenario went insane afterwards. In the end, polling consensus indicated that the Yorty defections had all but destroyed the Muskie/Bayh ticket across the South, turning the whole region close to safe GOP and significantly hurting Democrats in Yorty bastions in parts of California, Michigan and some western states. On the other hand, Yorty was beyond toxic to the liberal wing of the GOP and the Northeastern voters, allowing Muskie to comeback in New England and make several states closer still. With a highly volatile scenario in place, the time had come for a third candidate to make an impact...

The thought of John G. Schmitz as a legitimate Presidential candidate made those who had heard of him laugh back in 71'. Schmitz? The man that the Birthers think a bit too extreme? Get out of here! And sure enough, he started an independent campaign with little chance at all of making an impact. Not only his rhetoric forced most of the GOP to disown him, George Wallace was eating up any support a conservative challenger would win over. And then, event after event, Schmitz's candidacy began to take form... as the national climate quickly changed to a more conservative mood, as law and order took precedence, as Goldwater Jr and Yorty showed the extent of the anger, of the disappointment of the Silent Majority... so rose a man Americans knew little of, save that he was angry too, and not shy about it. Little by little the pieces fell into place, Birthers, sheriffs, activists, even John Wayne jumping on the wagon as Nixon vanquished Goldwater and Wallace fell apart.

Drawing his strength from the rising conservative wave of the year, Schmitz got on the ballots, led fundraising efforts, and was even successful at gaining support from those ignored and undermined on their own parties. A Senator in Buckley, Congressmen like Steiger, Ashbrook and Rarick, and a Convention that nominated a Schmitz/Rarick ticket and made it clear there could be a right-wing alternative to both parties. Ironically, the Yorty maneuver only fueled their chances, as disgusted GOP conservatives and Yorty voters distrustful of Nixon found another place to go. Polling around 4-5%, the Schmitz/Rarick ticket is virtually nonexistent through the North and the Pacific, but keeps large amounts of influence through South and West (and it's rumored it has moved above Muskie for second is those places where the Democratic ticket was hurt worse). But of course, with that performance media scrutiny has become fierce, and Schmitz does have an interesting record to defend...

But the stage was set. Republicans had gambled on the double down of their Silent Majority and the conservative wave, Democrats had gone for an uneasy alliance of those sectors opposed to Muskie in the hopes of victory, and the Independent ticket remained hopeful that dissatisfaction with both main tickets could bring them to a repeat of the Wallace success in 68'.

And then, with two months before the General Election, September rolled in.
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1043 on: February 13, 2016, 01:41:10 AM »

Turn Seventeen: Nixonland:
September 1st to September 7th, 1972


In the News!

Munich Massacre!
Eleven Israeli athetes murdered by Black September at the Olympic Village in Munich

Bobby Fisher new world chess champion:
After defeating Boris Spassky, Fisher crowns himself as the first American champion

Gallup: President Nixon's Approval Rating:

Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 38%
Undecided: 9%

Gallup: 1972 Presidential Election:


Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 47% (407 EV)
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 39% (103 EV)
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 6% (0 EV)
Undecided: 8% (28 EV)

Here it is, the first turn of the GE. Remember that every campaign can request polls for four states, and that polls have a margin of error up to 3%. You have until Monday night, this can be extended to Tuesday night if absolutely necessary.

Best of luck!
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1044 on: February 13, 2016, 01:44:11 AM »

That took a lot of time... anyway, there you go, I hope you enjoy the GE!

Also, I need to inform all of you of a small retcon. I have decided against having the Watergate scandal on the Game after all, so we can dismiss the earlier news piece on that. Nixon already has a corruption scandal regarding Agnew, and Watergate only happened on a very specific set of circumstances that are not likely to repeat themselves on this TL.

Don't forget to request your polling, and inform me if you are going to use surrogates (via player, I mean)!
Logged
YPestis25
Jr. Member
***
Posts: 974


Political Matrix
E: -4.65, S: -6.09

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1045 on: February 13, 2016, 01:52:51 AM »

Great work Lumine! I'm really glad to have this back. The Muskie/Bayh ticket has just a little bit of work to do.
Logged
NeverAgain
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 5,667
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1046 on: February 13, 2016, 01:55:27 AM »

Wonderful job! Glad to join YPestis in this adventure.
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1047 on: February 14, 2016, 09:14:38 PM »

First four polls by request in:

Gallup Polls:

New York:

Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 49%
Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 41%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 1%
Undecided: 9%

New Jersey:

Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 45%
Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 41%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 7%
Undecided: 7%

Pennsylvania:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 49%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 43%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 2%
Undecided: 6%

Illinois:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 48%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 42%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 3%
Undecided: 7%
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1048 on: February 14, 2016, 09:35:28 PM »

Second batch, I still need Schmitz's requests:

Gallup Polls:

Michigan:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 47%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 40%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 6%
Undecided: 7%

Indiana:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 50%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 41%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 2%
Undecided: 7%

Oregon:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 47%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 40%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 5%
Undecided: 8%

Washington:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 46%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 41%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 5%
Undecided: 7%
Logged
Lumine
LumineVonReuental
Atlas Politician
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 12,417


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1049 on: February 14, 2016, 09:36:52 PM »

Second batch, I still need Schmitz's requests:

Gallup Polls:

Michigan:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 47%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 40%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 6%
Undecided: 7%

Indiana:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 50%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 41%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 2%
Undecided: 7%

Oregon:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 47%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 40%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 5%
Undecided: 8%

Washington:

Richard Nixon/Sam Yorty: 46%
Ed Muskie/Birch Bayh: 41%
John Schmitz/John Rarick: 5%
Undecided: 7%
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 37 38 39 40 41 [42] 43 44 45 46 47 ... 51  
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

Page created in 0.078 seconds with 10 queries.