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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results
  2012 U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderator: ON Progressive)
  Brown County, WI Results by City/Village/Town
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Author Topic: Brown County, WI Results by City/Village/Town  (Read 776 times)
ElectionsGuy
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« on: June 23, 2013, 09:10:20 am »
« edited: June 23, 2013, 10:04:58 am by ElectionsGuy »

Brown County:
 
City/Village/Town                Romney %            Obama %
Green Bay (C)                       41.9%                 56.6%
De Pere (C)                          50.8%                 48.0%
Allouez (V)                           48.9%                 50.0%
Ashwaubenon (V)                  51.5%                 47.2%
Howard (V)                          55.2%                 43.6%
Pulaski (V)                           50.4%                 47.3%
Denmark (V)                         49.7%                 49.1%
Wrightstown (V)                   57.0%                  41.8%
Bellevue (T)                         52.4%                  46.9%
Eaton (T)                            53.3%                  45.1%
Glenmore (T)                        59.2%                  40.0%
Green Bay (T)                       60.2%                 38.8%
Hobart (T)                           59.1%                 39.9%
Holland (T)                           61.6%                 36.8%
Lawrence (T)                        61.5%                 37.5%
Humboldt (T)                        55.7%                  43.1%
Ledgeview (T)                      62.5%                  36.8%
Morrison (T)                         69.3%                  29.9%
New Denmark (T)                  54.7%                  44.5%
Pittsfield (T)                        61.1%                  37.8%
Rockland (T)                        64.7%                  34.6%
Scott (T)                            53.8%                  45.2%
Suamico (T)                         63.1%                  36.2%
Wrightstown (T)                   60.2%                  38.2%
Brown County                    50.3%                 48.5%      

Democratic leaning urban vote + Heavy Republican rural vote = leaning republican overall vote. Many townships in Brown County which is the reason why Romney won this County by a hair.

2 Cities, 6 Villages, and 16 Townships Make up this County, and only 1 City and 1 Village went to Obama.
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Franknburger
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2013, 09:39:07 am »

Beyond the urban-rural split, are there other patterns showing up? I have for example been speculating in several threads that Obama might have done better with rural mainline protestants (Lutherans), especially on the female side, than with Catholics, as (at least in Europe) the former tend to have a more socially moderate / liberal attitude. Linked to that, there is the common assumption that Obama has been doing particularly well among people with Norwegian ancestry.

There is also quite some evidence across several states that Catholic German-Americans have swung strongly towards Romney, but I wonder whether the same holds true for Lutheran German-Americans.

Counties (even rural counties) are typically too mixed in terms of religion / ancestry to allow for conclusions, but villages / townships might have maintained a level of 'pureness' (I assume initial settlers clustered according to religion) to allow for a more detailed insight in such patterns.
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2013, 09:52:41 am »

When talking about Green Bay and surrounds, and ethnic whites in the same sentence, you MUST make reference to the ethnic group that makes Green Bay unique. Walloons.

They voted Democratic pretty hard in 1916.
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ElectionsGuy
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2013, 10:05:58 am »

When talking about Green Bay and surrounds, and ethnic whites in the same sentence, you MUST make reference to the ethnic group that makes Green Bay unique. Walloons.

They voted Democratic pretty hard in 1916.


Sorry, don't know much about ethnic groups in Wisconsin.
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ElectionsGuy
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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2013, 10:14:50 am »

Beyond the urban-rural split, are there other patterns showing up? I have for example been speculating in several threads that Obama might have done better with rural mainline protestants (Lutherans), especially on the female side, than with Catholics, as (at least in Europe) the former tend to have a more socially moderate / liberal attitude. Linked to that, there is the common assumption that Obama has been doing particularly well among people with Norwegian ancestry.

There is also quite some evidence across several states that Catholic German-Americans have swung strongly towards Romney, but I wonder whether the same holds true for Lutheran German-Americans.

Counties (even rural counties) are typically too mixed in terms of religion / ancestry to allow for conclusions, but villages / townships might have maintained a level of 'pureness' (I assume initial settlers clustered according to religion) to allow for a more detailed insight in such patterns.

Well, I have noticed that family household areas are becoming increasingly republican, while non-family household areas are becoming increasingly republican, but then again that relates to the Rural-Urban split again because more family households in suburban/rural areas and vise versa. But rural areas with more households are much more republican. Wonder why Western Wisconsin is so Democratic? It's because about only 55% of houses are families, rather than in the high 60's in places like Washington County.
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Franknburger
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2013, 03:35:30 pm »

When talking about Green Bay and surrounds, and ethnic whites in the same sentence, you MUST make reference to the ethnic group that makes Green Bay unique. Walloons.

They voted Democratic pretty hard in 1916.

Brown County has quite an elevated share of people with Belgian ancestry (11% in the 2000 census, no distinction made there between Walloon and Flemish). However, the far dominating ancestry group is German (38.4%). Wikipedia lists Green Bay as number four US city as concerns German ancestry (after Dubuque IA, Fargo, and Madison).
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
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« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2013, 07:13:49 am »

Well, no surprises there. It is Wisconsin. The Northeast Wisconsin Belgian settlement, otoh, is unique (it's higher in the rural bits, and also the neighboring Door peninsula counties - reaches up to 50% in some townships).
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