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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  Presidential Election Trends (Moderator: Virginiá)
  18th and 19th Century Presidential Eras (search mode)
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Author Topic: 18th and 19th Century Presidential Eras  (Read 2059 times)
PoliSciFi
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Posts: 2
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« on: March 25, 2013, 09:38:03 am »

This is my first time posting here.  Frankly, I don't know why I haven't before.  Well, here 'goes.

cope1989 had a very nice post in this forum at index.php?topic=136656.0 about modern eras.  Simply for organizational purposes, I am trying to hammer out Presidential eras from Adams through Obama.  I particularly am interested in organizing them by campaigning styles.

Every aspect of this is open for criticism, most especially: naming the eras, criteria of the eras, which Presidents are encapsulated by the eras, and how many eras there should be.

One other thing, due to the near-complete lack of campaigning by Washington, I have not included his elections.  Let's go, eh?

  • The Jeffersonian Era: Adams through Quincy Adams - in this era campaigns were fought in partisan newspapers, the electorate was very narrowly defined, and GOTV comprised of getting supporters drunk. More seriously, we see for the first time campaign techniques and features we still see today: leafleting, distributed "ballots" that told people how to vote, and the first nominating conventions.
  • The Jacksonian Era: Jackson through Fillmore -  in this era, we see the two party system emerging and affecting electoral politics, campaigning for a candidate is encouraged by promises of patronage.
  • The Republican Era: Pierce (boo hiss) through Cleveland (the second time around) - newspapers continued to be important, parties sometimes chose compromise candidates (most pointedly in the case of Pierce) that were expected to not do much at all, candidates were able to debate and stump in front of local audiences more easily and relied less heavily on the newspapers to broadcast their messages as rail transportation neared its full potential (this also allowed them to cater messages to individual audiences without relying on sometimes unreliable local proxies), the building of coalitions of social groups with differing, but complementary goals, continued as Republicans ascended in general and the Democrats ascended in the South (especially toward the end of this era) as opposed to previous parties that built themselves around similar ideologies, and local party bosses came into play as cities became more important to the outcomes of national elections and the parties (and governments) divided large cities into wards.
  • The Progressive Era: McKinley through Hoover - newspapers and train tours continued to have a lot to do with how campaigns were conducted, the effects of do-gooders, suffragists and prohibitionists were felt heavily in this era as single-issue campaigns had strong influence on multi-issue national campaigns, and parties (which now included the Progressive Party, even though the Republican Party continued to dominate electoral contests) were first strengthened by abusing the Pendleton Act and then weakened by the 17th amendment - the campaigning effect of these two points was that these now-coalition-of-differing-groups-parties had to cater to groups of people that were politically-activated on the strength of one issue (government reform, suffrage, prohibition) but often did not agree with each other on other points that the parties may or may not speak to in their platforms.
  • The New Deal Era: FDR through Clinton - media now included audio (in the form of radio, vinyl, tapes and, toward the end, books on tape of candidates' biographies) and video (in the form of newsreels, propaganda films made by partisan Hollywood producers on both ends of the political spectrum, television, and, toward the end, video tapes distributed by the parties and campaigns) which dramatically increased the amount of customization the campaigns could achieve, campaigns became greatly affected by New Deal and Great Society policies and politics, the continued enfranchisement of blacks through case law and the 24th Amendment changed who it was worthwhile to campaign to, the 26th Amendment enfranchised 18-20 year olds in national elections, three major wars (WWII, Korea, Vietnam) distorted the lines between patriotism and politics, public trust in the political system degraded throughout this time period which made campaigning into a game of suppressing or enticing the vote, and the third party has disappeared again (although third parties did occasionally make their presence known (mostly due to a strong personality running: Thurmond, Wallace, Perot).
  • The Too-Recent-To-Speak-of-it-Historically-but-Let's-Anyhow Era: Bush and Obama - an partisan era, new media has a lot of influence which allows for micro-targeting of voters while traditional media still allows for blast-casting for votes, three of the four campaigns have been heavily colored by war and national security, some see this era as the ascendancy of the Libertarian Party.

Ready?  GO!
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PoliSciFi
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Posts: 2
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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2013, 09:38:48 am »

Well...I guess I changed my post after I titled it, huh?
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