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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
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  2012 U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  Map: Results of the 2012 Pres. Election in >90% Non-Hispanic White Counties
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Author Topic: Map: Results of the 2012 Pres. Election in >90% Non-Hispanic White Counties  (Read 5829 times)
АverroŽs 🦉
AverroŽs Nix
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« on: March 21, 2013, 08:44:47 am »
« edited: March 21, 2013, 10:53:23 am by Senator AverroŽs Nix »

My latest mapping project and possibly the first in a series:

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Snowstalker's Last Stand
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2013, 09:13:08 am »

Quite interesting. Seems to line up very well with the national swing map with the exceptions of Minnesota and New England/the St. Lawrence river valley.
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BaldEagle1991
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2013, 09:14:38 am »

No surprise on the voting pattern though.

I find it interesting that most of Missouri has 90%> counties.
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Benj
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2013, 10:32:03 am »
« Edited: March 21, 2013, 10:46:20 am by Benj »

What's the total vote in the >90% white counties?

Also trying to figure out the largest counties on the map. I think the ones larger than 200,000 people, in order, are:

Waukesha, WI
Westmoreland, PA
Rockingham, NH
Cumberland, ME
Lake, OH (which I'm really surprised is >90% white)
Washington, PA
St. Louis, MN

But I may be missing some.
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Franknburger
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2013, 03:27:16 pm »

From a Pew Forum study on voting trends according to Religion (Obama 2008 / 2012 / swing)

White Catholics:                                        47 / 40 / -7
White non-evangelical Protestants:          44 / 44 / --
White born-again / evangelical                 26 / 20 / -6
Jews (all races)                                         78 / 68 / -9
Unaffiliated (all races)                               75 / 70 / -5

The white catholic anti-Obama swing has already been extensively discussed in the Forum for places like Western Ohio, Southern Indiana, Southern Illinois etc.  
However, I wonder how  many of the mostly-white D countries are dominated by non-evangelical Protestants (which overall have not swung at all)? This should have played quite a role in New England and the upper Mid-West.
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opebo
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2013, 03:50:19 pm »

I find it interesting that most of Missouri has 90%> counties.

Very few Hispanics there, and most of the blacks live in cities.
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memphis
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2013, 07:02:18 pm »

Crazy that there are so many counties that are so monolithically white. 
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Benj
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2013, 07:29:08 pm »
« Edited: March 21, 2013, 07:39:32 pm by Benj »

From a Pew Forum study on voting trends according to Religion (Obama 2008 / 2012 / swing)

White Catholics:                                        47 / 40 / -7
White non-evangelical Protestants:          44 / 44 / --
White born-again / evangelical                 26 / 20 / -6
Jews (all races)                                         78 / 68 / -9
Unaffiliated (all races)                               75 / 70 / -5

The white catholic anti-Obama swing has already been extensively discussed in the Forum for places like Western Ohio, Southern Indiana, Southern Illinois etc.  
However, I wonder how  many of the mostly-white D countries are dominated by non-evangelical Protestants (which overall have not swung at all)? This should have played quite a role in New England and the upper Mid-West.

Not really. They all have sizeable Catholic populations, many plurality Catholic. Some are defined to a large extent by their non-Catholic populations, particularly in New England, where the non-Catholics are often fragmented between different, related groups (see the lonely Vermont County that is plurality Episcopalian--but also note the Catholic majority in two of the far upstate counties and Coos County, NH). Areas like SW Wisconsin are actually heavily Catholic, though elsewhere in the Upper Midwest there are a lot of Lutherans. The dominant group is going to be "no religion" in places like Missoula County, Montana (also true to an extent in New England, but the NW, even the conservative parts, identifies much more strongly with "no religion" than New England does).

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Snowstalker's Last Stand
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2013, 08:44:39 pm »

I'd love to see a map of results in Hispanic-plurality counties (majority probably wouldn't be big enough)
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Franknburger
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« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2013, 09:12:54 am »
« Edited: March 22, 2013, 09:26:36 am by Franknburger »

From a Pew Forum study on voting trends according to Religion (Obama 2008 / 2012 / swing)

White Catholics:                                        47 / 40 / -7
White non-evangelical Protestants:          44 / 44 / --
White born-again / evangelical                 26 / 20 / -6
Jews (all races)                                         78 / 68 / -9
Unaffiliated (all races)                               75 / 70 / -5

However, I wonder how  many of the mostly-white D countries are dominated by non-evangelical Protestants (which overall have not swung at all)? This should have played quite a role in New England and the upper Mid-West.

Not really. They all have sizeable Catholic populations, many plurality Catholic. Some are defined to a large extent by their non-Catholic populations, particularly in New England, where the non-Catholics are often fragmented between different, related groups (see the lonely Vermont County that is plurality Episcopalian--but also note the Catholic majority in two of the far upstate counties and Coos County, NH). Areas like SW Wisconsin are actually heavily Catholic, though elsewhere in the Upper Midwest there are a lot of Lutherans. The dominant group is going to be "no religion" in places like Missoula County, Montana (also true to an extent in New England, but the NW, even the conservative parts, identifies much more strongly with "no religion" than New England does).

Alright, religion may be part of, but is definitely not the full answer. What about these, traditionally catholic groups?

French ancestry (2000 census)


French-Canadian ancestry (2000 census) - note especially Piscataquis, ME !


Irish ancestry (2000 census)
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