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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results
  2012 U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  47,076 people...
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Author Topic: 47,076 people...  (Read 4240 times)
PR
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« on: February 06, 2013, 10:11:32 am »

...in San Francisco voted for Romney.

Who are these people? Tongue
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wan
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2013, 10:24:56 am »

...in San Francisco voted for Romney.

Who are these people? Tongue



The very wealthy.
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Obamanation
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2013, 10:43:03 am »

...in San Francisco voted for Romney.

Who are these people? Tongue



The very wealthy.

Yes, but probably not exclusively. Just look at the Pac Heights precincts.
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Sbane
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« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2013, 12:36:00 pm »

The wealthy and some immigrant groups would be my guess. The Chinese areas, especially out in the Sunset, vote more Republican than the city as a whole.
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Torie
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« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2013, 12:56:07 pm »

The wealthy and some immigrant groups would be my guess. The Chinese areas, especially out in the Sunset, vote more Republican than the city as a whole.

Some might be very similar to - well, me.  Tongue
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bgwah
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« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2013, 01:48:08 pm »

don't forget old people. The city was still 1/3 Republican a few decades ago.
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Stranger in a strange land
strangeland
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« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2013, 02:10:04 pm »

I'm sure somewhere out there, there were at least a couple of Hipsters so deeply seeped in their own irony that they voted for Romney ironically.
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ajc0918
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2013, 03:43:37 pm »

I'm sure somewhere out there, there were at least a couple of Hipsters so deeply seeped in their own irony that they voted for Romney ironically.

duh voting obama is too mainstream
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memphis
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« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2013, 03:48:34 pm »

How about the 21,381 people in DC who voted for the party whose core message is to destroy DC's economy?
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Snowstalker's Last Stand
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« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2013, 03:59:23 pm »

How about the 21,381 people in DC who voted for the party whose core message is to destroy DC's economy?

Lobbyists.
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Obamanation
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« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2013, 04:51:07 pm »

Incidentally, does anyone know of SF result maps by precinct? It would be cool to see. A swing and trend from 2008 map would also be awesome!
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Stranger in a strange land
strangeland
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« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2013, 04:56:47 pm »

How about the 21,381 people in DC who voted for the party whose core message is to destroy DC's economy?

Lobbyists.

This. Also, Georgetown.
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Wherever you want to go, you can't go there!
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« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2013, 05:25:46 pm »

In places like Utah County and all of Wyoming except Laramie, Jackson and maybe parts of Cheyenne, it appears that the only people who would vote for Obama are the very poor and the very liberal. The median voter never considers the Democratic Party except if they know that person and they are not for a statewide office. San Fransico and D.C. probably operate the same way.  So, in Democratic strongholds, only the very rich (probably in these places, the top 10 of earners are in the top 1-2% of earners nation-wide) and the very religious vote Republican (though instead of 30%..its more like 10-15% in these areas).
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DINGO Joe
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« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2013, 06:47:14 pm »

...in San Francisco voted for Romney.

Who are these people? Tongue


wiggers
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CountryClassSF
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2013, 01:30:10 am »
« Edited: February 07, 2013, 01:50:40 am by CountryClassSF »

Well, all the stereotyping is truly flattering, but unfortunately, I am  not rich.  Not old either. Not very religious.

Precinct results are available on sfelections.org, but unfortunately not a map by precinct this time.  I can tell you that some of Romney's best precincts were in the Marina and worst in the Haight.  You can match the precinct data with the  precinct numbers on the precinct map which is also available on the site.

I would say that on a personal level, I'm a very conservative person and I live in the most liberal city on the galaxy. Some people have to live where they do because they go to school or go to work in that area, some people enjoy the fog & the mild weather.  
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bgwah
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« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2013, 02:55:26 am »

Here is the 2008 map (created by RI). I don't know about a 2012 one.

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Badger
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« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2013, 09:24:37 am »

I'm sure somewhere out there, there were at least a couple of Hipsters so deeply seeped in their own irony that they voted for Romney ironically.

duh voting obama is too mainstream

People that hipster don't often vote.
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Badger
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« Reply #17 on: February 07, 2013, 09:27:07 am »

Well, all the stereotyping is truly flattering, but unfortunately, I am  not rich.  Not old either. Not very religious.

Precinct results are available on sfelections.org, but unfortunately not a map by precinct this time.  I can tell you that some of Romney's best precincts were in the Marina and worst in the Haight.  You can match the precinct data with the  precinct numbers on the precinct map which is also available on the site.

I would say that on a personal level, I'm a very conservative person and I live in the most liberal city on the galaxy. Some people have to live where they do because they go to school or go to work in that area, some people enjoy the fog & the mild weather.  

Tell us more what you know about the (relatively) Romney supoortive areas and GOP/conservative voters in Frisco, man. Please?
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Sbane
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« Reply #18 on: February 07, 2013, 02:14:37 pm »

The Marina, and adjoining areas like Nob Hill, are as yuppie as they come so they are slightly more Republican. Still, the most Republican areas are on the west side of the city where things are just a touch more suburban. The most Democratic areas are in the middle of the city in neighborhoods like Haight-Ashbury, Castro, Noe Valley and the Mission. Very hipster out there and they vote 90%+ Democrat.
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memphis
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« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2013, 02:51:02 pm »

Here's where the Asians live:

I have no data to support this, but I would suspect that Asians are much more likely to be SF natives whereas white liberals come in adulthood to live in the white liberal mecca.
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bgwah
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« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2013, 03:13:02 pm »

The northern cluster of >60% precincts is the whitest part of the city (over 80% white), and appears fairly wealthy as well.

The southwestern cluster is also mostly white, but more in the 50-60% range. It appears a little more suburban in nature (detached homes) and definitely on the wealthier side.

The central western cluster appears to be the Sunset District, and the most Republican part of it seems correlates with the most heavily Chinese part of the neighborhood. I'm not familiar with SF enough to know if this means it is the Chinese who are (relatively) Republican, or if they're more recent arrivals and an older white population makes up a very disproportionate amount of the vote like they do in many communities. Given that the Chinese-American community is well-established in SF, the latter explanation doesn't seem as likely. We don't see the same Republican cluster in the older Chinatown, but it may be more dominated by non-voting immigrants allowing other groups to keep it more Democratic. It also depends on what kind of Chinese live there --- Asian immigrants who left primarily to avoid Communists are much more prone to conservative politics. Perhaps some of them clustered in the Sunset District? Just a guess.

The >90% areas are generally the stereotypical hippie and gay areas, as well as the mostly black areas like Hunters Point in the SE.

Seattle is somewhat similar to SF. Both are West Coast cities that give similar percentages to the Democrats, are the two gayest cities in the country, and have similar economies. One major difference is that SF is less white than Seattle is. Still, in Seattle the most Republican areas are definitely the wealthier white neighborhoods, which doesn't seem as true in SF. Seattle has some conservative Asian areas, but it appears to more closely correlate with the Vietnamese population than the Chinese population. Gay marriage fell way behind Obama in heavily Asian areas. Given how prominent the gay community is in SF, and their association with the Democratic Party, it may turn off some more socially conservative/moderate Asians from the Democrats there. Though that's probably kind of obvious.
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Obamanation
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« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2013, 03:29:32 pm »

The northern cluster of >60% precincts is the whitest part of the city (over 80% white), and appears fairly wealthy as well.

That cluster is the wealthiest part of the city. Pacific Heights right near the Presidio and just north of Jackson St (fun fact: Nancy Pelosi lives in this enclave, I've seen her in church). We are talking Hearst family and up type wealth. the real-life plutocrats. Incidentally, that may be my precint since I live on Jackson and vote at University High School. I wonder how far those precincts swung this time...

Anyway, thanks for the map bgwah!
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CountryClassSF
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« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2013, 05:16:47 pm »
« Edited: February 07, 2013, 05:18:45 pm by CountryClassSF »

Tell us more what you know about the (relatively) Romney supoortive areas and GOP/conservative voters in Frisco, man. Please?

One thing many people may be surprised of, is like elsewhere around the country, conservative or Republican positions on ballot initiatives and certain ideas outperform the Republican candidates carrying the label on the ballot.  One may conclude that there are certain "turn offs" to the Republican brand, but not necessarily the conservative idea.

A good example of this would be Prop 8 - 2008's initiative protecting  traditional marriage.

Yes on 8 received 25% of the vote in San Francisco, far outnumbering John McCain's 13% or so vote totals.

An image  retrieved o the San Francisco Chronicle (http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Some-areas-of-S-F-voted-to-ban-same-sex-marriage-3261879.php#photo-2411324) from Nov. 2008 after the election:



The precincts that voted in favor of Prop 8 were in Chinatown/North Beach, the Financial District and some parts of SOMA around Market St near Union Square, Bayview (Higher African-American population than the rest of the city), and a handful of precincts around the Sunset (heavily Asian) and Lake Merced.

As you can see, some of the precincts that voted No on 8 in the Sunset had a much higher percentage of "Yes" voters than the remainder of the city.  Even the gay-dominated Castro district had precincts register atleast 3% of the vote in favor of traditional marriage.

This is a good map that is less about D vs R -- with the notable exception of Bayview with high black opposition to SSM at the time...but the average composition of conservative vs liberal position on an issue or a ballot initiative.

However, if you compare this particular map to Obama vs McCain, you can see that the conservative position on the given issue outperformed the Republican candidate.

As recently as Nov. 2012, there was an item on the ballot expressing opposition to corporate personhood. It passed 81%-18%, but the "No" had nearly 15,000 more votes than Mitt Romney did.

Even in this extreme liberal enclave, conservative *ideas* (Although still very unpopular in the city) outperform Republican candidates themselves.
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Obamanation
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« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2013, 05:32:30 pm »

I am not surprised by the stronger prop 8 support (and relatively lower Obama support) in the Outer Richmond and Little Russia. Richmond certainly has a ton of immigrants and while Little Russia is certainly smaller and more diverse than it once was, the area between 27th and 17th avenues continues to house many of the city's Russian immigrants who are of course more Republican and socially conservative.
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Sbane
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« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2013, 07:04:36 pm »

The northern cluster of >60% precincts is the whitest part of the city (over 80% white), and appears fairly wealthy as well.

The southwestern cluster is also mostly white, but more in the 50-60% range. It appears a little more suburban in nature (detached homes) and definitely on the wealthier side.

The central western cluster appears to be the Sunset District, and the most Republican part of it seems correlates with the most heavily Chinese part of the neighborhood. I'm not familiar with SF enough to know if this means it is the Chinese who are (relatively) Republican, or if they're more recent arrivals and an older white population makes up a very disproportionate amount of the vote like they do in many communities. Given that the Chinese-American community is well-established in SF, the latter explanation doesn't seem as likely. We don't see the same Republican cluster in the older Chinatown, but it may be more dominated by non-voting immigrants allowing other groups to keep it more Democratic. It also depends on what kind of Chinese live there --- Asian immigrants who left primarily to avoid Communists are much more prone to conservative politics. Perhaps some of them clustered in the Sunset District? Just a guess.

The >90% areas are generally the stereotypical hippie and gay areas, as well as the mostly black areas like Hunters Point in the SE.

Seattle is somewhat similar to SF. Both are West Coast cities that give similar percentages to the Democrats, are the two gayest cities in the country, and have similar economies. One major difference is that SF is less white than Seattle is. Still, in Seattle the most Republican areas are definitely the wealthier white neighborhoods, which doesn't seem as true in SF. Seattle has some conservative Asian areas, but it appears to more closely correlate with the Vietnamese population than the Chinese population. Gay marriage fell way behind Obama in heavily Asian areas. Given how prominent the gay community is in SF, and their association with the Democratic Party, it may turn off some more socially conservative/moderate Asians from the Democrats there. Though that's probably kind of obvious.

The northernmost, white part is the wealthiest part of the city as has been said, and is more yuppie than hippie. I didn't enjoy going out as much in the Marina as I do in the Mission. Way more douchebags around. And no Mexicans randomly showing up at 2AM to cook hotdogs.

The reason for Chinatown voting so Democrat and the Sunset not voting as Democrat comes down to income, imo. Chinatown is more low income, and full of more recent immigrants who don't have many marketable skills. The Sunset on the other hand is wealthier, the Chinese who live there are more established, and the area has more of a suburban feel.
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