|           

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 09, 2020, 06:06:27 am
News:
If you are having trouble logging in due to invalid user name / pass:

Consider resetting your account password, as you may have forgotten it over time if using a password manager.

  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  Can someone make a county map for 1920 and/or 1936?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print
Author Topic: Can someone make a county map for 1920 and/or 1936?  (Read 8357 times)
A18
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 23,808
Political Matrix
E: 9.23, S: -6.35

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« on: February 11, 2005, 09:28:55 pm »

They'd be interesting.
Logged
Rob
Bob
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 6,282
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2005, 09:33:03 pm »

I could, but my computer's hard drive is fried so I don't have access to Microsoft Paint. When it's fixed, I might do it; I was already thinking of making one anyway.

I don't have access to the Atlas info for that time, but there's a book at the library that has all of the county results going back to 1920.
Logged
A18
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 23,808
Political Matrix
E: 9.23, S: -6.35

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2005, 09:40:06 pm »

You should send that info to Dave. He doesn't have country results for southern states prior to 1940, with a few exceptions.
Logged
Rob
Bob
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 6,282
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2005, 09:48:13 pm »

I finally got around to making these. Here's 1920. It's presently without Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina; I'll be updating it until it's finished. Here's 1936; it's missing Arkansas and Kentucky, but again, it will get updated.

While we're at it, here's 1924 (missing Iowa and Kentucky), 1928 (missing Tennessee and Virginia), and 1932 (missing Kentucky).
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2005, 09:50:13 pm »

I finally got around to making these. Here's 1920. It's presently without Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina; I'll be updating it until it's finished. Here's 1936; it's missing Arkansas and Kentucky, but again, it will get updated.

While we're at it, here's 1924 (missing Iowa and Kentucky), 1928 (missing Tennessee and Virginia), and 1932 (missing Kentucky).

Nice! Do you not have the data for the missing states?
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2005, 09:54:23 pm »

In FDR's 1936 landslide, it looks like he won 13 out of 62 counties in his homestate. He only won 2 counties in nearby Vermont.
 
Logged
Rob
Bob
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 6,282
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2005, 10:03:10 pm »

I finally got around to making these. Here's 1920. It's presently without Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina; I'll be updating it until it's finished. Here's 1936; it's missing Arkansas and Kentucky, but again, it will get updated.

While we're at it, here's 1924 (missing Iowa and Kentucky), 1928 (missing Tennessee and Virginia), and 1932 (missing Kentucky).

Nice! Do you not have the data for the missing states?

Thanks. I have the data available; it's just very tedious to color in the maps. They'll definitely all be finished eventually, though.
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2005, 10:13:22 pm »

I finally got around to making these. Here's 1920. It's presently without Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina; I'll be updating it until it's finished. Here's 1936; it's missing Arkansas and Kentucky, but again, it will get updated.

While we're at it, here's 1924 (missing Iowa and Kentucky), 1928 (missing Tennessee and Virginia), and 1932 (missing Kentucky).

Nice! Do you not have the data for the missing states?

Thanks. I have the data available; it's just very tedious to color in the maps. They'll definitely all be finished eventually, though.

What would be nice is some system where you specify the boundaries, and then it takes in the data and colors it for you. The county boundaries do change, but not that often. You could use such a system to easily make custom maps, like the Eugene Debs vote by county with custom colors.
Logged
Beet
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 25,426


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2005, 04:10:12 pm »

It's interesting how the West is so much more volatile than the East. In 1920 and 1936, nearly every county in the west voted for the winning candidate, while the northeast and southeast resisted landslides quite well.

That tells you something about the bandwagon nature of politics in a place where people don't have strong roots and deep history.
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2005, 04:46:35 pm »

It's interesting how the West is so much more volatile than the East. In 1920 and 1936, nearly every county in the west voted for the winning candidate, while the northeast and southeast resisted landslides quite well.

That tells you something about the bandwagon nature of politics in a place where people don't have strong roots and deep history.

However, Carter in 1976 did poorly in the west, despite winning.
Logged
PBrunsel
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 9,543


WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2005, 05:12:51 pm »
« Edited: June 03, 2005, 05:26:31 pm by Senator PBrunsel »

I think I know why those few counties in Mississippi and Arkansas voted for Hoover, due to his work there durring their 1927 floods. Their are still statutes to him in the areras effected by the Great Floods of 1927.
Logged
Ebowed
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 18,271



WWW Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2005, 05:19:56 pm »

I finally got around to making these. Here's 1920. It's presently without Oklahoma, Missouri, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina; I'll be updating it until it's finished. Here's 1936; it's missing Arkansas and Kentucky, but again, it will get updated.

While we're at it, here's 1924 (missing Iowa and Kentucky), 1928 (missing Tennessee and Virginia), and 1932 (missing Kentucky).
Great maps!!
Logged
Joe Republic
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 35,019
Kiribati


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2005, 07:56:17 pm »

Excellent work, Bob!  Have you shown your data source to Dave?  I expect he'd be incredibly grateful for it.
Logged
Rob
Bob
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 6,282
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2005, 08:01:44 pm »

Excellent work, Bob!  Have you shown your data source to Dave?  I expect he'd be incredibly grateful for it.

Thanks Smiley. Unfortunately, I don't think Dave would be able to use it, since it doesn't include third party votes (other than the major ones like LaFollette, Wallace, and Perot).
Logged
Joe Republic
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 35,019
Kiribati


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2005, 08:04:02 pm »

I could be wrong, but at the county level it probably wouldn't matter.  It certainly wouldn't hurt to ask Dave if it would be of any use.
Logged
Beet
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 25,426


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2005, 02:52:32 pm »
« Edited: June 04, 2005, 02:54:42 pm by thefactor »

It's interesting how the West is so much more volatile than the East. In 1920 and 1936, nearly every county in the west voted for the winning candidate, while the northeast and southeast resisted landslides quite well.

That tells you something about the bandwagon nature of politics in a place where people don't have strong roots and deep history.

However, Carter in 1976 did poorly in the west, despite winning.

1976 was hardly a landslide, though. Also, by the 1970s the West was begining to develop its own sustained political heritage.

The more interesting exception is 1896-- brought on by an economic crisis that disproportionately affected Western farmers. The West's abandonment of the Democratic ticket in 1900-1908 compared to the South's loyalty to it shows that 1896 is the exception that proves the rule, however.
Logged
Rob
Bob
Concerned Citizen
*****
Posts: 6,282
United States
Political Matrix
E: -6.32, S: -9.39

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2005, 09:06:59 pm »

1920, 1924, 1928, and 1936 have all been updated.
Logged
Schmitz in 1972
Liberty
Jr. Member
***
Posts: 1,318
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2005, 09:49:44 pm »


Very nice! I'm looking at the 1920 map and thinking "and people say we're too polarized now?"
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2005, 10:54:46 pm »


Very nice! I'm looking at the 1920 map and thinking "and people say we're too polarized now?"

Exit polls going back to 1972 show it's by far the most polarized it's been starting with 1972. Too bad we don't have exit polls from the '20s and '30s.
Logged
Beet
Atlas Star
*****
Posts: 25,426


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2005, 01:43:05 pm »


Very nice! I'm looking at the 1920 map and thinking "and people say we're too polarized now?"

Exit polls going back to 1972 show it's by far the most polarized it's been starting with 1972. Too bad we don't have exit polls from the '20s and '30s.

It is true that polarization has followed a rough parabolic shape from 1920 to today. Before 1928, the partisan bases were sharply defined and relatively homogenous. They could be determined through an economic basis derived from the agricultural economy, which in turn was derived soil fertility and ultimately from climate.

Northern white ethnics and blacks' invasion of the Democrats was then followed by southern Baptists' invasion of the Republicans that year. This threw the postwar partisan alignment into chaos. The agricultural basis was no longer relevant in the industrial society.

The chaos transition period (1928 onwards) is now coming to a close. The spoke-and-hub artificial transportation system has replaced the natural clime-based agricultural system as the basic unit of economic activity, and by derivation, of its contribution to the determination of politics.

The Republicans have found a new economically determined base around the spoke of the modern spoke-and-hub transportaiton system and the Democrats have found a similiar base near the hub of the system. The demise of Dixiecrat state legislatures in Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee, when such occurs, can be said to be the final conclusion of such a transformation. As of today, it is not yet complete; but taking 1928 as the beginning and 1972 as the median, we can expect it to be completed around  the year 1972 + (72-28) = 2016, assuming symmetry around the trough of polarization and partisan power.
Logged
bgwah
Atlas Icon
*****
Posts: 13,832
United States


Political Matrix
E: -1.03, S: -6.96

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2005, 03:47:56 pm »

Interesting how FDR got 59% of the vote in New York but most counties.

What are the numbers for New York City?
Logged
Schmitz in 1972
Liberty
Jr. Member
***
Posts: 1,318
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2005, 07:33:39 pm »

I actually found this site by accident, but it's pretty sweet!

county maps 1856-present!

So what if it's in french?
Logged
J. J.
Atlas Superstar
*****
Posts: 32,914
United States


Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2005, 08:23:11 pm »

Look at the 1860 map of Illinois!!!!
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #23 on: June 11, 2005, 08:47:56 pm »

Why are their maps so small?
Logged
○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└
jfern
Atlas Legend
*****
Posts: 47,288


Political Matrix
E: -7.38, S: -8.36

Show only this user's posts in this thread
« Reply #24 on: June 11, 2005, 08:59:27 pm »

Lots of graphs there. It looks like people in Republican areas are more likely to be divorced.

Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length
Logout

Terms of Service - DMCA Agent and Policy - Privacy Policy and Cookies

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines