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  Talk Elections
  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
  U.S. Presidential Election Results
  2012 U.S. Presidential Election Results (Moderators: Torie, ON Progressive)
  500k+ metros for Romney
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Author Topic: 500k+ metros for Romney  (Read 4013 times)
memphis
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« on: November 13, 2012, 10:26:01 am »
« edited: December 12, 2012, 12:37:53 am by memphis »

1. Dallas
2. Houston
3. Atlanta
4. Phoenix
5. Pittsburgh
6. San Antonio
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City
9. Charlotte
10. Indianapolis
11. Nashville
12. Jacksonville
13. Louisville
14. Oklahoma City
15. New Orleans
16. Salt Lake City
17 Birmingham
18. Tulsa
19. Fresno
20. Omaha
21. Bakersfield
22. Dayton
23. Baton Rouge
24. Grand Rapids
25. Little Rock
26. Sarasota
27. Knoxville
28. Charleston
29. Colorado Springs
30. Greenville
31. Fort Myers
32. Boise
33. Wichita
34. Lakeland
35. Augusta
36. Ogden
37. Harrisburg
38. Melbourne
39. Provo
40. Chattanooga
41. Lancaster
EDIT: Atlanta narrowly avoided being on this list. Good catch, BK!
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traininthedistance
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« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2012, 10:32:54 am »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).
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memphis
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« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2012, 10:53:17 am »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melbourne,_Florida
Atlanta and Pittsburgh were quite close. And yes, Atlanta's metro is rather broadly defined by the gubmint. Rather absurdly so.
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traininthedistance
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2012, 11:53:27 am »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melbourne,_Florida
Atlanta and Pittsburgh were quite close. And yes, Atlanta's metro is rather broadly defined by the gubmint. Rather absurdly so.


Aha, the Space Coast.  Makes perfect sense.
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Benj
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« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2012, 12:08:42 pm »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).

Charlotte is also a surprise. It must take in a lot more than Mecklenburg, Gaston, Lincoln, Cabarrus, Union and York County, SC.
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memphis
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« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2012, 12:53:21 pm »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).

Charlotte is also a surprise. It must take in a lot more than Mecklenburg, Gaston, Lincoln, Cabarrus, Union and York County, SC.
Quoth wikipedia: "The Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)[3] is defined as twelve counties in North Carolina and four counties in South Carolina."
But just the six counties you mentioned deliver a Romney win as well.
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Gass3268
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« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2012, 10:28:47 pm »

Nice to see that Milwaukee and St. Louis are not on this list.
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mileslunn
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2012, 09:47:50 pm »

1. Dallas
2. Houston
3. Atlanta - You would have to go out pretty far for this.  If you take just the built up areas, I am pretty sure Obama won.
4. Phoenix
5. Pittsburgh - Romney won SW Pennsylvania, but if you just take the built up areas of Pittsburgh I think Obama won albeit by a rather small margin compared to what the Democrats usually win by.
6. San Antonio
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City - Johnson County, Missouri and Wyandotte County contain a large chunk of the metro population and they would solidly for Obama so I doubt he won the KC metro area unless you are using the media market area which maybe Romney did
9. Charlotte
10. Indianapolis - Marion County went for Obama by more than 20 points and I believe the majority of the Indianapolis metro area lives in Marion County.  Yes the surrouding counties went heavily for Romney but not likely enough to cancel out Obama's strength in Marion County.
11. Nashville
12. Jacksonville
13. Louisville
14. Oklahoma City
15. New Orleans
16. Salt Lake City
17 Birmingham
18. Tulsa
19. Fresno
20. Omaha
21. Bakersfield
22. Dayton
23. Baton Rouge
24. Grand Rapids
25. Little Rock
26. Sarasota
27. Knoxville
28. Charleston
29. Colorado Springs
30. Greenville
31. Fort Myers
32. Boise
33. Wichita
34. Lakeland
35. Augusta
36. Ogden
37. Harrisburg
38. Melbourne
39. Provo
40. Chattanooga
41. Lancaster

Asides from those pointed above, not much argument.  It also depends on how far out you stretch the metro area since the further you take anyone out the better it will be for Romney.  Area you just taking the continuous built up areas, any community within commuting distance, or the greater media market as depending which of those three you use you would get different results.
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mileslunn
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2012, 09:48:53 pm »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).

Charlotte is also a surprise. It must take in a lot more than Mecklenburg, Gaston, Lincoln, Cabarrus, Union and York County, SC.

You have a strong urban vs. suburban/exurban split otherwise the city itself probably went for Obama with over 2/3 while the suburbs are generally over 60% GOP.
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Badger
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2012, 01:22:54 am »

1. Dallas
2. Houston
3. Atlanta - You would have to go out pretty far for this.  If you take just the built up areas, I am pretty sure Obama won.
4. Phoenix
5. Pittsburgh - Romney won SW Pennsylvania, but if you just take the built up areas of Pittsburgh I think Obama won albeit by a rather small margin compared to what the Democrats usually win by.
6. San Antonio
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City - Johnson County, Missouri and Wyandotte County contain a large chunk of the metro population and they would solidly for Obama so I doubt he won the KC metro area unless you are using the media market area which maybe Romney did
9. Charlotte
10. Indianapolis - Marion County went for Obama by more than 20 points and I believe the majority of the Indianapolis metro area lives in Marion County.  Yes the surrouding counties went heavily for Romney but not likely enough to cancel out Obama's strength in Marion County.
11. Nashville
12. Jacksonville
13. Louisville
14. Oklahoma City
15. New Orleans
16. Salt Lake City
17 Birmingham
18. Tulsa
19. Fresno
20. Omaha
21. Bakersfield
22. Dayton
23. Baton Rouge
24. Grand Rapids
25. Little Rock
26. Sarasota
27. Knoxville
28. Charleston
29. Colorado Springs
30. Greenville
31. Fort Myers
32. Boise
33. Wichita
34. Lakeland
35. Augusta
36. Ogden
37. Harrisburg
38. Melbourne
39. Provo
40. Chattanooga
41. Lancaster

Asides from those pointed above, not much argument.  It also depends on how far out you stretch the metro area since the further you take anyone out the better it will be for Romney.  Area you just taking the continuous built up areas, any community within commuting distance, or the greater media market as depending which of those three you use you would get different results.

This is actually a good analysis for Pittsburgh actually. At least as far as culture goes. There a SW Pennsylvanians who consider themselves to live in 'pittsburgh' (or at least how they'd introduce themselves to strangers on vacation) who don't even live in Allegheny County.
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memphis
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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2012, 02:28:41 pm »

I used the Census's definition of Metropolitan Statistical Area. They do tend to cover wider areas than what I would choose, but they're the experts and I needed some established guidelines. Particularly with Atlanta, the metro area extends forever. See the map I posted earlier in the thread. Like most things, a sense of metropolitan area is not binary. It fades gradually as one increases distance from an urban core.  And Atlanta and Pittsburgh were very close. Kansas City is always more Republican because of Johnson County, Kansas, a large wealthy suburban county (by far the most populous and richest county in KS) with a strong GOP showing. Thomas Frank, who wrote What's the Matter with Kansas is from there. Hamilton County, north of Indianapolis, is similarly full of well to do Republican white people.
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Bacon King
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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2012, 04:24:53 pm »

I'm not sure where you got the results for Atlanta, but in the 29 county Atlanta MSA, I have the following results:

Obama: 1,096,628 (50.26%)
Romney: 1,057,819 (48.48%)

I think your numbers might also include the counties in the Atlanta Combined Statistical Area?
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memphis
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« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2012, 06:31:20 pm »

I'm not sure where you got the results for Atlanta, but in the 29 county Atlanta MSA, I have the following results:

Obama: 1,096,628 (50.26%)
Romney: 1,057,819 (48.48%)

I think your numbers might also include the counties in the Atlanta Combined Statistical Area?
I was using a misleading wikipedia article Tongue Checked with the offical census website and I shouldn't have been including Hall County. I stand corrected. I'm not super familiar with the Atlanta area. On paper, it looks too far for commuters, but the growth out there is explosive. What gives?
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Bacon King
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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2012, 06:37:15 pm »

I'm not sure where you got the results for Atlanta, but in the 29 county Atlanta MSA, I have the following results:

Obama: 1,096,628 (50.26%)
Romney: 1,057,819 (48.48%)

I think your numbers might also include the counties in the Atlanta Combined Statistical Area?
I was using a misleading wikipedia article Tongue Checked with the offical census website and I shouldn't have been including Hall County. I stand corrected. I'm not super familiar with the Atlanta area. On paper, it looks too far for commuters, but the growth out there is explosive. What gives?

Oh, it's far, but a lot of people don't really seem to mind an hour-long commute I guess? Of course, while a lot of people do make the commute from the counties on the outer edge all the way to downtown, it's a lot more common to see people in the closer suburbs having jobs in Atlanta proper, while many people in the outer counties actually have jobs in the inner suburbs rather than the city itself. In Barrow County, I knew a few people who worked in Atlanta, but more people worked in places like Northern Dekalb or the more built-up parts of Gwinnett.

The growth is so explosive because there's that cascade effect, I suppose, where the suburbs themselves become major commuter destinations.
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True Federalist
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« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2012, 01:03:19 am »

I'm not sure where you got the results for Atlanta, but in the 29 county Atlanta MSA, I have the following results:

Obama: 1,096,628 (50.26%)
Romney: 1,057,819 (48.48%)

I think your numbers might also include the counties in the Atlanta Combined Statistical Area?
I was using a misleading wikipedia article Tongue Checked with the offical census website and I shouldn't have been including Hall County. I stand corrected. I'm not super familiar with the Atlanta area. On paper, it looks too far for commuters, but the growth out there is explosive. What gives?

For the large metro areas its a ripple effect.  If County B has a good number of commuters who work in County A, and County C has a good number of commuters who work in County B.  Then County A and County C can end up in the same statistical area even if Counties A and C have little to do with each other directly.
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nclib
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« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2012, 10:11:39 pm »

The only ones outside the Sun Belt:

5. Pittsburgh
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City
10. Indianapolis
13. Louisville?
20. Omaha?
22. Dayton
24. Grand Rapids
37. Harrisburg
41. Lancaster

Louisville and Omaha are borderline cases.

What makes these areas conservative? Pittsburgh is the Coal Belt moving to the right.
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freepcrusher
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« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2012, 11:07:08 pm »

The only ones outside the Sun Belt:

5. Pittsburgh
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City
10. Indianapolis
13. Louisville?
20. Omaha?
22. Dayton
24. Grand Rapids
37. Harrisburg
41. Lancaster

Louisville and Omaha are borderline cases.

What makes these areas conservative? Pittsburgh is the Coal Belt moving to the right.

Cincinnati is a heavily german, ancestrally republican area. There's also a large socon population.

The Kansas City MSA takes in a lot of rural areas that are probably very socon. There also isn't a Lincoln Park or Greenwich Village to balance it out.

Indianapolis has always been a republican metro area. It's a very white collar metro area and the type of people who populated Chicago or Detroit (from southern and eastern Europe) never came to Indy.

The city of Louisville itself is democratic, but everything else is conservative. See Kansas City.

I don't see how Omaha is borderline. It's clearly not southern by any definition. Omaha is further west and the further west (or south) in the midwest you go, the more GOP it gets. Omaha is on the great plains and there is a large conservative catholic population if I recall. It's not a terribly big metro area so it doesn't attract the type of people who live in Chicago, NY, LA etc.

Dayton also has a large socon catholic population. It is the most labor heavy area of SW Ohio, but there is a lot of ruby red suburban turf in the Kettering area.

Grand Rapids is the dutch.

Harrisburg is a small sized metro area and those type of areas tend to be conservative.

In Lancaster, its the Pennsylvania dutch.
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mileslunn
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« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2012, 11:26:32 pm »

The only ones outside the Sun Belt:

5. Pittsburgh
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City
10. Indianapolis
13. Louisville?
20. Omaha?
22. Dayton
24. Grand Rapids
37. Harrisburg
41. Lancaster

Louisville and Omaha are borderline cases.

What makes these areas conservative? Pittsburgh is the Coal Belt moving to the right.

Cincinnati is a heavily german, ancestrally republican area. There's also a large socon population.

The Kansas City MSA takes in a lot of rural areas that are probably very socon. There also isn't a Lincoln Park or Greenwich Village to balance it out.

Indianapolis has always been a republican metro area. It's a very white collar metro area and the type of people who populated Chicago or Detroit (from southern and eastern Europe) never came to Indy.

The city of Louisville itself is democratic, but everything else is conservative. See Kansas City.

I don't see how Omaha is borderline. It's clearly not southern by any definition. Omaha is further west and the further west (or south) in the midwest you go, the more GOP it gets. Omaha is on the great plains and there is a large conservative catholic population if I recall. It's not a terribly big metro area so it doesn't attract the type of people who live in Chicago, NY, LA etc.

Dayton also has a large socon catholic population. It is the most labor heavy area of SW Ohio, but there is a lot of ruby red suburban turf in the Kettering area.

Grand Rapids is the dutch.

Harrisburg is a small sized metro area and those type of areas tend to be conservative.

In Lancaster, its the Pennsylvania dutch.

In the case of Pittsburgh as mentioned below much of that has more to do with the surrounding areas that make up the metro.  They are fairly white too and I suspect the Democrat strength historically had more to do with labour unions being strong which is less the case today.

Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin had big German communities, so I think that has less to do with it today, maybe historically (although most of German descent probably voted Republican simply because they are white, tend to be more rural, and more Protestant than Catholic although I suspect amongst those of German descent it was by religion, i.e. Evangelical Protestants massively Republican, Catholics and Mainline Protestants slightly Republican, while no religion heavily Democrat) and more to do with its geographic location.  Cincinnati is not part of the Rust Belt and is semi-southern.  Lets remember the North vs. South divide is not a solid line on the map but rather it gets more conservative as one heads southward.

Kansas City is probably because of how rural it is and also in the Northeast and Great Lakes, the population density is much higher so even rural areas are quite different than in the middle parts of the country.  Pretty much every county in the Northeast and Great Lakes metro area has at least 200 people/per square mile and in most cases it is over 400 people/square mile in the most outerly least dense counties, whereas in the Middle parts of the country pretty much every county beyond the built up areas or partially built up areas has under 100 people/square mile.  If you mapped things on population density basis you would probably say the Republican victories were bigger in the lower density rural counties than higher density ones. 

Indianapolis itself, while historically Republican, actually went fairly solidy for Obama although the surrounding counties went heavily Republican as the central part of the state is generally where the Republicans are strongest.  If you took just the built up areas I suspect Obama would have carried the Indianapolis metro.

Omaha is in the middle of country and lacks the transient population like you have in Denver and Las Vegas so no real surprise.  Its a slightly larger version of Topeka, Kansas which also went Republican.

Louisville - Itself actually went Democrat, but has more to do with pretty much all the surrounding areas are staunchly GOP thus pretty much any metro area south of the Ohio River will go GOP unless it has a really large minority population like Memphis.

Dayton - If you look at just the raw numbers of the metro areas makes perfect sense as Toledo and Cleveland went solidly Democrat, Columbus only narrowly went for Obama while Cincinnati is even more Republican.  In Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio the further south you go the more favourable things are for the Republicans.

Harrisburg - Pretty small city itself and the metro is rather the collection of many communities some which are very conservative.  In fact I believe in the past few elections the GOP has gotten under 10% in Harrisburg proper although I also believe it is around 50% African-American and has a large Latino community which most of the surrounding ones lack.

Grand Rapids - As mentioned a large Dutch Reformed community and the Dutch Reformed church is a very conservative one.  While it is true most areas with large numbers of people of Dutch ancestry vote heavily GOP, this has more to do with religion than ancestry.  In Wisconsin where the Dutch are mostly Catholic it is a lot more competitive with only a slight GOP advantage as is generally the case amongst White Catholics. 

Lancaster - Like Harrisburg not a large city and rather a collection of many towns in close proximity, many which are very conservative.  The Pennsylvania Dutch are mostly Amish and although I am sure those who do vote, vote heavily GOP, not sure that voter turnout amongst this group is that high.
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mileslunn
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« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2012, 11:43:18 pm »

1. Dallas - Quite divided actually between the city itself which is strongly Democrat due to a minority-majority population while the suburbs who have experienced a lot of white flight and are very southern culturally vote massively Republican.
2. Houston - Same reason as Dallas, just slightly more heavily GOP.
3. Atlanta
4. Phoenix - The city itself votes Democrat but not by the massive margins most other cities its size do so the Republican strength in the suburbs easily cancels out the Democrat strength in the city.  Also large numbers of seniors too.  In most other metro areas the Democrats rack up big enough margins in the city proper to cancel out GOP support in the suburbs/exurbs.
5. Pittsburgh
6. San Antonio - More to do with surrounding areas being heavily GOP, although I wonder how much longer it will stay this way as this area has a very large Latino community and if the GOP continues to do poorly amongst them, this isn't likely to last long. 
7. Cincinnati
8. Kansas City
9. Charlotte - Unlike Raleigh-Durham where you have a lot of high tech companies in the suburbs, the suburbs are heavily Republican so they pretty much cancel out the Democrat strength in the city proper. 
10. Indianapolis
11. Nashville - Not having as large an African-American community as Memphis and not running up the Democrat margins in the city while going massively GOP in the suburbs is the main reason.
12. Jacksonville - Unlike other Florida cities, this is probably the most culturally southern, otherwise extremely racially polarized so as long as whites are the majority it will go GOP. 
13. Louisville
14. Oklahoma City - Part of the Bible belt with most whites being Evangelical Protestants and not as large a minority population as cities further South. 
15. New Orleans - Huge urban/suburban divide also the areas most heavily devastated by Hurricane Katrina were the most heavily Democrat areas and the fact some left and haven't returned has hurt the Democrats. 
16. Salt Lake City - Large Mormon community who vote Republican by ridiculously large numbers.  I am pretty sure Obama won the city itself but lost badly in the suburbs. 
17 Birmingham - Very racially polarized metro - Jefferson County is only starting to go Democrat due to white flight to neighboring suburbs. 
18. Tulsa - See Oklahoma City
19. Fresno - Part of the Central Valley which has long been very conservative, although with the growing Latino population I wouldn't be surprised if this area eventually starts going Democrat. 
20. Omaha
21. Bakersfield - Same as Fresno, just slightly more heavily GOP as generally the Northern parts of the Central Valley closest to the Bay Area are the most competitve while the further South and away from the large coastal metro areas you get the more heavily GOP it goes. 
22. Dayton
23. Baton Rouge - Part of the Deep South and very racially polarized.
24. Grand Rapids
25. Little Rock - The city itself is pretty Democrat, but the surrounding areas are heavily GOP like the rest of Arkansas and it lacks the large African-American community needed to even make this competitive.
26. Sarasota - large senior community and not as large a Latino population as Miami, Tampa, or Orlando.
27. Knoxville - Located in Eastern Tennessee which has voted Republican since reconstruction never mind its far enough South the white community votes massively GOP and lacks a large enough African-American community to offset this. 
28. Charleston - Like much of the South quite racially polarized.
29. Colorado Springs - large Evangelical population in addition Colorado Springs itself only has 250,000 people around and it pretty much extends right to the countryside so the metro area has to include a lot of rural areas, although I am pretty much positive Romney won the city proper. 
30. Greenville - Southern city with a lower than average African-American community.
31. Fort Myers - Much like Sarasota large senior community and not as large a Latino community as Miami, Tampa, or Orlando.
32. Boise - Is this really over 500,000?  Besides located in the Mountain West which is very conservative to begin with and lacks the minority or transient population that Las Vegas or Denver have.
33. Wichita - Northern edge of the Bible belt and close to 80% white where the white vote is over 2/3 GOP thus Democrats can only win here with large minority population or a liberal enclave like Austin. 
34. Lakeland - See Sarasota and Fort Myers.
35. Augusta - Another southern racially polarized metro
36. Ogden - Heavily Mormon
37. Harrisburg
38. Melbourne - Same as Sarasota, Fort Myers, and Lakeland
39. Provo - Over 80% Mormon
40. Chattanooga - Similiar to Knoxville but has a larger African-American community so not quite as heavily GOP.
41. Lancaster
EDIT: Atlanta narrowly avoided being on this list. Good catch, BK!

On the others please see my comments above
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Badger
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« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2012, 03:46:22 pm »

I'm not sure where you got the results for Atlanta, but in the 29 county Atlanta MSA, I have the following results:

Obama: 1,096,628 (50.26%)
Romney: 1,057,819 (48.48%)

I think your numbers might also include the counties in the Atlanta Combined Statistical Area?
I was using a misleading wikipedia article Tongue Checked with the offical census website and I shouldn't have been including Hall County. I stand corrected. I'm not super familiar with the Atlanta area. On paper, it looks too far for commuters, but the growth out there is explosive. What gives?

Have you double-checked Pgh?

@ Mileslunn: you are spot on. Pgh is one of the whitest metro areas in the north. It's Democratic strength was based on industial unions which, while not disappeared, have declined even more than elsewhere in the nation, and Democratic vote share along with it.
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Smash255
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« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2012, 01:38:30 am »


What?

Besides that, the only surprises on this list are Pittsburgh (well, it wasn't surprising after watching Obama further collapse in SWPA) and Atlanta (the metro area must take in far, far more hinterlands than I realized).

Charlotte is also a surprise. It must take in a lot more than Mecklenburg, Gaston, Lincoln, Cabarrus, Union and York County, SC.
Quoth wikipedia: "The Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)[3] is defined as twelve counties in North Carolina and four counties in South Carolina."
But just the six counties you mentioned deliver a Romney win as well.

My parents moved to Lancaster County, SC.  They are right along the far northern tip, along the border with Mecklenburg.  That area has seen tremendous growth,
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minionofmidas - supplemental forum account
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« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2012, 05:03:01 am »

4. Phoenix - The city itself votes Democrat but not by the massive margins most other cities its size do so the Republican strength in the suburbs easily cancels out the Democrat strength in the city.  Also large numbers of seniors too.  In most other metro areas the Democrats rack up big enough margins in the city proper to cancel out GOP support in the suburbs/exurbs.
This is misleading - the city limits include the northern suburbs almost to the edge of the metro. There are far more urban areas outside the city limits to the east and to a lesser extent to the west. The urban parts of Phoenix are pretty Democratic.

One reason why Atlanta is stretching so far out is the lay of the land, incidentally - you leave the mountains open and build in the next valley instead.
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DINGO Joe
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« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2012, 02:54:54 pm »

What parishes make up the New Orleans metro?

Orleans, Jefferson, St. Tammany, ST. Bernard, Plaquemines, St. Charles and St. John are the ones I've always traditionally known as the metro.  If that is the metro, then Obama actually won it by the tiniest of margins.
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« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2012, 04:41:28 am »

You are correct regarding the Metropolitan Area (while the Combined Statistical Area adds Washington Parish) but one of us cannot add, it seems. I get 253,791 votes for Romney and 253,567 votes for Obama.
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BaldEagle1991
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« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2012, 09:33:45 am »

These areas just suffer the same formula: heavily minority/poor/younger-in-age Democratic city, suburban/white/religious GOP.
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