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Author Topic: Italy Election Maps  (Read 55014 times)
Хahar 🤔
Xahar
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« Reply #125 on: December 17, 2010, 08:49:07 PM »

It might make a bit more sense if the map was white for places that the parties didn't contest.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #126 on: December 17, 2010, 08:55:43 PM »

It might make a bit more sense if the map was white for places that the parties didn't contest.

The only one where it might cause confusion is Forza Italia; in all other cases it's either very obvious or the places were the sort of places that they'd have polled extremely poorly in anyway. There's not much difference in practice between being on the ballot and polling 0.5% and not being on the ballot at all.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #127 on: December 17, 2010, 09:39:11 PM »

This is a ghastly rough map but it illustrates the breakthrough and that's the point:



Grosseto province. The northern division is Massa Marittima, the southern is Grosseto. Composition of the single member divisions is actually on Interior Ministry's elections archive as they break down results by comune. Smiley

The only problem is that there's no such useful information for divisions that split municipalities; like those in the larger cities. Still, I think it might be possible to make approximate maps for those as it's likely that they followed internal administrative boundaries to a reasonable extent. Besides, if it's a national map that's made such districts will be so small that it won't matter that much.
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Keystone Phil
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« Reply #128 on: December 17, 2010, 10:48:16 PM »

Sicily really loves them some Silvio.

I'm a little surprised by the strength of the Greens in Naples. I guess it makes sense since that constituency is mostly the city itself but even still. Their strength in the Northeast is really odd.
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Antonio the Sixth
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« Reply #129 on: December 18, 2010, 05:37:26 AM »

Is that 1994 ?

And what makes FI so strong in Sicilia ? Huh
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minionofmidas
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« Reply #130 on: December 18, 2010, 06:03:12 AM »

Is that 1994 ?

And what makes FI so strong in Sicilia ? Huh
The Mafia endorsement. Tongue (Or just the usual "yeah, we aren't that bad. Damn outsiders not understanding anything" mood.)


Who was AD?
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Keystone Phil
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« Reply #131 on: December 18, 2010, 06:09:31 AM »

I guess Sicily also liked the "new guy that can solve all of our problems" in spite (or maybe because) of the fact that he was a northern businessman.
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minionofmidas
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« Reply #132 on: December 18, 2010, 06:17:37 AM »

I guess Sicily also liked the "new guy that can solve all of our problems" in spite (or maybe because) of the fact that he was a northern businessman.
"New" in the sense of "old wine, new bottle"? Tongue

I kind of like the PSI/PSDI maps. More ordinary southern folk who thought the north and the media had their knickers in a twist.
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minionofmidas
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« Reply #133 on: December 18, 2010, 07:01:18 AM »

The big name in La Rete was Leoluca Orlando, who's in Italia dei Valori now (and still an MP).
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #134 on: December 18, 2010, 09:16:46 AM »


Some centrist outfit that hoovered up people from the lay parties, briefly seemed to threaten doing alright, but then faded. Its policies seem to have been roughly those that the PRI used to stand for in theory, so I've used their colours.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #135 on: December 18, 2010, 09:24:50 AM »

I kind of like the PSI/PSDI maps. More ordinary southern folk who thought the north and the media had their knickers in a twist.

I enjoyed making them; actually had to adjust the keys when I saw that the PSI managed 8% in Basilicata and the PSDI 4% in Molise (which is... um... actually an increase on 1992). After laughing, of course.
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Iannis
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« Reply #136 on: December 20, 2010, 12:26:57 PM »

I kind of like the PSI/PSDI maps. More ordinary southern folk who thought the north and the media had their knickers in a twist.

I enjoyed making them; actually had to adjust the keys when I saw that the PSI managed 8% in Basilicata and the PSDI 4% in Molise (which is... um... actually an increase on 1992). After laughing, of course.

In South almost everything depends on local candidates. Especially in 1994 when big parties failed, and the bew ones like Forza Italia had not the time to deepen thei roots everywhere, so in more rural places only local personalities counted.
 now there's a proportional system, not costituencies. so party's leader basically are candidate everywhere at the first or second place and then they choose depending on the people they want to favour in the regions.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #137 on: December 23, 2010, 08:51:03 PM »



1976; the PCI's best ever showing, though not actually the closet they came to finishing ahead of the DC's. Actually I think that 34% might be the highest ever polled by a Communist party in a General Election in 'Western' Europe, though someone will now come along and prove me wrong. Either way, an extraordinary result that led to the unusual political arrangements of the late 1970s in which the PCI actually propped up DC governments.

Couple of minor notes; there might be some small rounding inconsistencies in a couple of places for the minor parties because I've mostly been making this set while unable to sleep, and the deputy elected in Val d'Aosta ran on a joint PCI-PSI slate.
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Хahar 🤔
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« Reply #138 on: December 24, 2010, 12:29:06 AM »

Either way, an extraordinary result that led to the unusual political arrangements of the late 1970s in which the PCI actually propped up DC governments.

You can't say these things and then not elaborate, although I think I might have an inkling as to what you're talking about.
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Iannis
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« Reply #139 on: December 24, 2010, 05:06:24 AM »

Either way, an extraordinary result that led to the unusual political arrangements of the late 1970s in which the PCI actually propped up DC governments.

You can't say these things and then not elaborate, although I think I might have an inkling as to what you're talking about.

To avoid tensions DC and PCI for three years cooperated in the government, through communist abstensions in Parliament.
It's incohomprensible for a foreigner, and a little also for me.
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minionofmidas
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« Reply #140 on: December 24, 2010, 05:37:57 AM »

The only thing that's incomprehensible is why the PCI agreed to it.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #141 on: December 24, 2010, 10:53:51 AM »

It was part of Berlinguer's attempt to move the PCI out of the political ghetto; the so-called 'Historic Compromise'. It made a degree of sense, but it was based on a misinterpretation of the nature and structures of the DC regime (regrettably).
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Iannis
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« Reply #142 on: December 27, 2010, 03:14:46 AM »

It was part of Berlinguer's attempt to move the PCI out of the political ghetto; the so-called 'Historic Compromise'. It made a degree of sense, but it was based on a misinterpretation of the nature and structures of the DC regime (regrettably).

Ghetto is the natural place for a communist party. Unfotunately in Italy, unique case in europe, communist were the main opposizion to christian democats, not socialdemocratic. Take care in definitions, like "regime", being DC democratically elected as any othe party in Europe.
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Keystone Phil
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« Reply #143 on: December 27, 2010, 03:18:19 AM »

It was part of Berlinguer's attempt to move the PCI out of the political ghetto; the so-called 'Historic Compromise'. It made a degree of sense, but it was based on a misinterpretation of the nature and structures of the DC regime (regrettably).

Ghetto is the natural place for a communist party. Unfotunately in Italy, unique case in europe, communist were the main opposizion to christian democats, not socialdemocratic. Take care in definitions, like "regime", being DC democratically elected as any othe party in Europe.

It was worth it. Look at the Italian Left now.  Smiley
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Iannis
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« Reply #144 on: December 27, 2010, 05:23:06 AM »

It was part of Berlinguer's attempt to move the PCI out of the political ghetto; the so-called 'Historic Compromise'. It made a degree of sense, but it was based on a misinterpretation of the nature and structures of the DC regime (regrettably).

Ghetto is the natural place for a communist party. Unfotunately in Italy, unique case in europe, communist were the main opposizion to christian democats, not socialdemocratic. Take care in definitions, like "regime", being DC democratically elected as any othe party in Europe.

It was worth it. Look at the Italian Left now.  Smiley

Look what? They changed now, but just because they HAD to change. they couldn't remain even behind Russia and Eastern Europe trend
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Keystone Phil
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« Reply #145 on: December 27, 2010, 02:11:31 PM »

It was part of Berlinguer's attempt to move the PCI out of the political ghetto; the so-called 'Historic Compromise'. It made a degree of sense, but it was based on a misinterpretation of the nature and structures of the DC regime (regrettably).

Ghetto is the natural place for a communist party. Unfotunately in Italy, unique case in europe, communist were the main opposizion to christian democats, not socialdemocratic. Take care in definitions, like "regime", being DC democratically elected as any othe party in Europe.

It was worth it. Look at the Italian Left now.  Smiley

Look what? They changed now, but just because they HAD to change. they couldn't remain even behind Russia and Eastern Europe trend

I'm saying that they are a joke now even as a more sane bunch.  Wink
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #146 on: December 27, 2010, 06:50:44 PM »

Ghetto is the natural place for a communist party.

Is that a statement of fact or an opinion of the way things ought to have been? (past tense important; there are no communist parties now. At least not in the sense that there was before the fall of the wall). I suspect you probably meant both, but the first is what's actually interesting, mostly because the leadership of the PCI were acutely aware of that and (unlike the leadership of, for example, the PCF) attempted to do something about it. Of course they got stuck and eventually split because it turned out that the gap between being a social democratic party and a Marxist-Leninist organisation was actually a wall. Interesting experiment, though it's difficult to see how it could have ever turned out differently.

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Well there's no doubt that they always topped the poll in general elections, so at that level, yeah. Beyond that things are at best debatable.

But I routinely use 'regime' to describe governments that I don't especially care for, even when elected so I'm not making those aspersions, anyway.
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Stan
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« Reply #147 on: August 29, 2011, 05:23:34 PM »

Very interesting discussion, and compliments for everibody, because the Italian politic is very difficoult to understand (is difficoult for an Italian, and I think for a foreigner is too difficoult!).
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