Canadian Election Results Thread
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Author Topic: Canadian Election Results Thread  (Read 124606 times)
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
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« Reply #650 on: May 04, 2011, 01:52:25 PM »

Liberals did godawful across Northern Ontario. Not only did some Liberals swing to the NDP to stop the Conservatives, many did the same to the Conservatives to stop the NDP.
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DistingFlyer
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« Reply #651 on: May 04, 2011, 01:56:51 PM »

Liberals did godawful across Northern Ontario. Not only did some Liberals swing to the NDP to stop the Conservatives, many did the same to the Conservatives to stop the NDP.

Perhaps more to the Tories than the NDP (most left-wing Liberals had probably bolted in the region already) - their Kenora majority is up & they even grabbed Sault Ste. Marie.

The same thing appeared to be the case in NS - Regan held on in Halifax West as his lost votes mostly went to the third-place Tory candidate; as well, the four rural Tory MPs all increased their majorities while the NDP's Peter Stoffer saw a swing against him in Sackville.

Perhaps in Winnipeg too - I had not expected to see someone lik Jim Maloway out of a job, especially in a seat like Elmwood.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #652 on: May 04, 2011, 02:15:40 PM »

Perhaps in Winnipeg too - I had not expected to see someone lik Jim Maloway out of a job, especially in a seat like Elmwood.

He didn't win by much in 2008 and the provincial government has become unpopular since then - remember that in 1988 the NDP lost a lot of ground (and seats) in Manitoba, despite their national surge and for related reasons. Obviously a top NDP target next time round, no matter what happens when the boundaries are redrawn.
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Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
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« Reply #653 on: May 04, 2011, 04:20:36 PM »

I've taken a look at the Liberal Caucus, and I find very few of them that are at danger of defection. The only three that seem logical are Bob Rae to the NDP, and Joyce Murray and Stephane Dion to the Greens.
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Хahar 🤔
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« Reply #654 on: May 04, 2011, 04:22:43 PM »

The NDP would never take Bob Rae back.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #655 on: May 04, 2011, 04:29:43 PM »

Map time! As always use the magic of 'right click' to get a bigger version... comments will appear later, but perhaps you could add your own (like milk in tea).

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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #656 on: May 04, 2011, 04:30:12 PM »

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Holmes
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« Reply #657 on: May 04, 2011, 04:30:41 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 04:32:17 PM by Holmes »


That's the GTA, not Toronto. Toronto is actually only just the NDP and Liberal ridings near Lake Ontario. Etobicoke, North York and Scarborough are in Toronto, technically, but are pretty different. The rest outside (Mississauga, Brampton, Pickering, Vaughan, there's a sh**tload) is the GTA.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #658 on: May 04, 2011, 04:31:07 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 05:35:36 PM by Comrade Sibboleth »

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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #659 on: May 04, 2011, 04:32:04 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 05:36:30 PM by Comrade Sibboleth »

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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #660 on: May 04, 2011, 04:32:48 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 05:34:56 PM by Comrade Sibboleth »

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Holmes
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« Reply #661 on: May 04, 2011, 04:35:33 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 05:37:50 PM by Comrade Sibboleth »


Hmm. Maybe it's time for northern Ontario secession discussions again. Tongue We can be called "Better Ontario", or "The Non-Sheep Ontario".

Thanks for the maps! Smiley
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cinyc
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« Reply #662 on: May 04, 2011, 05:01:00 PM »


That's the GTA, not Toronto. Toronto is actually only just the NDP and Liberal ridings near Lake Ontario. Etobicoke, North York and Scarborough are in Toronto, technically, but are pretty different. The rest outside (Mississauga, Brampton, Pickering, Vaughan, there's a sh**tload) is the GTA.

That's kind of like saying Brooklyn and the Bronx aren't New York City.  As a legal and practical matter, Toronto is much more than just the NDP and Liberal ridings near Lake Ontario.  The Etobicoke, Scarborough and the Don Valley ridings that were won the by Tories are in Toronto - since amalgamation in 1998 or, arguably, 1954 when the metropolitan government of Toronto was first created.  The Tory areas in Mississauga or Vaughn are not.

If I'm reading the map correctly, Toronto basically includes the area east of and including the ridings along the 427 to the blue riding where the 401 almost meets the lake, and south of the line just south of where the 427 ends.
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Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
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« Reply #663 on: May 04, 2011, 05:05:36 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Greater_toronto_area_map.svg

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Holmes
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« Reply #664 on: May 04, 2011, 05:24:06 PM »


That's the GTA, not Toronto. Toronto is actually only just the NDP and Liberal ridings near Lake Ontario. Etobicoke, North York and Scarborough are in Toronto, technically, but are pretty different. The rest outside (Mississauga, Brampton, Pickering, Vaughan, there's a sh**tload) is the GTA.

That's kind of like saying Brooklyn and the Bronx aren't New York City.  As a legal and practical matter, Toronto is much more than just the NDP and Liberal ridings near Lake Ontario.  The Etobicoke, Scarborough and the Don Valley ridings that were won the by Tories are in Toronto - since amalgamation in 1998 or, arguably, 1954 when the metropolitan government of Toronto was first created.  The Tory areas in Mississauga or Vaughn are not.

I was referring to the amalgamation when I used the term "technically" - the "former" Toronto is what I referenced to when I talked about the ridings near Lake Ontario. Downtown Toronto is very different from Etobicoke, which is different from Scarborough, which is different from North York, etc. They're all different culturally and politically, and the latter are more like suburbs, as you can see from the results. And even the 2010 mayoral race, Ford won everything outside of downtown, so I can't say I'm really surprised by the Conservatives' showing. But yeah, a lot of people, when referring to Toronto, still just mean downtown.

But yeah, I hate when people are referring to the GTA, and call it Toronto. Big difference.
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Meeker
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« Reply #665 on: May 04, 2011, 05:31:03 PM »


That's the GTA, not Toronto. Toronto is actually only just the NDP and Liberal ridings near Lake Ontario. Etobicoke, North York and Scarborough are in Toronto, technically, but are pretty different. The rest outside (Mississauga, Brampton, Pickering, Vaughan, there's a sh**tload) is the GTA.

I just stole it from Wikipedia; didn't make it.
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cinyc
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« Reply #666 on: May 04, 2011, 05:36:23 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 05:38:01 PM by cinyc »

And a close-up of the city of Toronto (click for a closeup)



I was referring to the amalgamation when I used the term "technically" - the "former" Toronto is what I referenced to when I talked about the ridings near Lake Ontario. Downtown Toronto is very different from Etobicoke, which is different from Scarborough, which is different from North York, etc. They're all different culturally and politically, and the latter are more like suburbs, as you can see from the results. And even the 2010 mayoral race, Ford won everything outside of downtown, so I can't say I'm really surprised by the Conservatives' showing. But yeah, a lot of people, when referring to Toronto, still just mean downtown.

But yeah, I hate when people are referring to the GTA, and call it Toronto. Big difference.

I understand what you're saying - in the New York City area, when people say they are going into "the city", they usually mean Manhattan, not Staten Island or Queens.  And Staten Island and The Bronx are very different from Manhattan and each other, culturally and politically.  But that doesn't mean that they are not part of New York City and if a Republican wins NY-13, there's no Republican representing New York City.

The map Meeker posted is centered on the city of Toronto, but cropped so that it includes other parts of the GTA.
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DistingFlyer
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« Reply #667 on: May 04, 2011, 05:47:27 PM »
« Edited: May 04, 2011, 05:51:23 PM by DistingFlyer »


The steep Tory rise in Nova Scotia surprised (and rather pleased) me - they'd not seen much of an increase in the last few elections as many red Tories (the norm around here) had not followed the merged parties, and provincially they've been devastated by Rodney MacDonald's bumbling. The CBC had been saying that Peter MacKay might be at risk, but I rarely trust CBC predictions of this kind (I don't remember them giving a great deal of chance to the NB Tories last fall either). The Atlantic Tories may be truly back in business at last.

Incidentally, thank you no end for these maps - given the size of this country it's rather difficult to make a good electoral map, and most that I've come across online have not been very good or editable. These are fabulous.
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Filuwaúrdjan
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« Reply #668 on: May 04, 2011, 05:48:22 PM »

WRT the when is Toronto not Toronto debate... the New York comparison doesn't quite work as the boundary of that city has been settled for a long time; the amalgamation was very recent and fairly controversial. So Scarborough (for example) is both part of Toronto (both legally and for most practical purposes) but isn't in certain other respects. In Britain people tend to identify where they live based on the pre-1974 local government areas (without being aware that that's what they do), and the situation the parts of Canada where there was a mania for forced amalgamations in the 1990s is probably similar.

Though I think there's some Tory representation within the old city anyway; it's not as though those boundaries respected - even the boundary of the current city is breached at one point.
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cinyc
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« Reply #669 on: May 04, 2011, 06:07:13 PM »

WRT the when is Toronto not Toronto debate... the New York comparison doesn't quite work as the boundary of that city has been settled for a long time; the amalgamation was very recent and fairly controversial. So Scarborough (for example) is both part of Toronto (both legally and for most practical purposes) but isn't in certain other respects. In Britain people tend to identify where they live based on the pre-1974 local government areas (without being aware that that's what they do), and the situation the parts of Canada where there was a mania for forced amalgamations in the 1990s is probably similar.

Though I think there's some Tory representation within the old city anyway; it's not as though those boundaries respected - even the boundary of the current city is breached at one point.

Granted, 1898 (when NYC was amalgamated) isn't 1998 due to the passage of time, but the city borders are what the city borders are, regardless of when amalgamated.  NYC borough identity and pride still does exist, especially in Brooklyn and Staten Island.  And the boroughs are different from each other.

I suspect the boundary of the current city was breached for population balance reasons, necessitating a Pickering-Scarborough East riding.
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Foucaulf
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« Reply #670 on: May 04, 2011, 06:11:34 PM »

But yeah, I hate when people are referring to the GTA, and call it Toronto. Big difference.

Quite guilty of that. My reasoning has always been that the "GTA" encompassed what is now amalgamated Toronto, quite like how the "Lower Mainland" refers to Vancouver and all the suburbs under control of the GVRD which would be called Vancouver after amalgamation.

But, going back to the Liberal collapse - more people should be talking about Mississauga-Brampton! Peel region has gone entirely Tory, and by a far wider swing than Toronto. The Tory takeover of Brampton, at the very least, could be evidence that their targeting minorities strategy has worked, if only among the Indians. Or that they were right about immigrants only voting Liberal out of nostalgia.
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True Federalist (진정한 연방 주의자)
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« Reply #671 on: May 04, 2011, 06:18:43 PM »

Hmm. Maybe it's time for northern Ontario secession discussions again. Tongue We can be called "Better Ontario", or "The Non-Sheep Ontario".

Just go with the name of another Great Lake, Superior (or its Ojibwe name, Gichigami).
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Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
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« Reply #672 on: May 04, 2011, 09:20:09 PM »

http://yfrog.com/hs34gyp

Not shopped. http://enr.elections.ca/ElectoralDistricts_e.aspx
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trebor204
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« Reply #673 on: May 05, 2011, 02:18:45 AM »

These  results in LaSalle-Emard are considered validated!
So did Marx-Leninist won a seat? (Its the NDP-Marx had there votes traded)
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MaxQue
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« Reply #674 on: May 05, 2011, 02:20:26 AM »

These  results in LaSalle-Emard are considered validated!
So did Marx-Leninist won a seat? (Its the NDP-Marx had there votes traded)


I suppose than, if there is a legal problem, they will ask to the NDP candidate to ask a recount.
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