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  Literary preferences quiz
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Author Topic: Literary preferences quiz  (Read 850 times)
Scott🦋
Scott
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« on: May 14, 2019, 07:43:36 pm »

Curious to see what my fellow booklovers here get.

Here are my results:



My results suggest a high preference that is "Gothic," rich in 'Transcendentalism' and 'High Fantasy.'  My favorite authors are Edgar Allan Poe, Stephen King, Henry David Thoreau, and C.S. Lewis, so I'd say it's pretty accurate.

Link to quiz
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Nathan
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2019, 12:23:31 am »



My results suggest a taste for exuberant, over-the-top fantasy that has a strong moral and philosophical compass and a certain directness to it. This definitely describes some of my favorite writers (like Tolkien and Lewis) but I also like Flannery O'Connor and Shirley Jackson a lot more than this would imply, possibly because this test doesn't sufficiently distinguish between darkness in the service of a philosophical or theological point and darkness in the service of edgelord nihilism.

Certain aspects of the way the questions are worded and the fact that the page links to PewDiePie for some reason lead me to suspect that whoever wrote this test is fash or fash-adjacent.
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Antonio V
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2019, 01:08:31 am »
« Edited: May 15, 2019, 01:29:33 am by Secret Cavern Survivor »



Yup, that seems about right. Give me simple prose in the service of a straightforward, uplifting message grounded in strong morals but which doesn't shy from addressing complex issues, and going above and beyond the narrow confines of our reality. No edgy grimdark bullsh*t or pointless stylistic overindulgence.

I have no idea what to make of the urban/rural dimension. I don't have a strong preference on it and the whole thing feels superfluous and tacked on to prove some kind of point. All the other dimensions speak to literary tastes on a very broad and abstract level, but this one is strangely specific about a particular setting preference. If they wanted to get into specific setting preferences, there were many other dimensions to take into account besides the level of urbanization.
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Cath
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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2019, 12:25:53 am »

Minimalism vs. Maximalism: 50-50
Fantasy vs. Reality: 54.5-45.5
Dark vs. Celebratory: 60-40
Urban vs. Rural: 45-55
Moralistic vs. Satirical: 55.6-44.4
Abstract vs. Concrete: 50-50
Philosophical vs. Cozy: 62.5-37.5

I don't hold too much to these results, since I don't have a firm enough grasp of fiction or of my own tastes to say I prefer one thing over another thing on a lot of these questions. Moreover, I think that some of these "juxtaposing" categories are actually simply complementary. The use of archetypes can itself be part of some sort of intellectual exploration. Urban and rural aesthetics are interesting in their own light, and why shouldn't they be able to interact? More to the point, both can be utilized properly, and I would prefer either to a story that does not contemplate or interact well with its own setting. Isn't fantasy most compelling when it somehow acts as a mirror on our own world? And who's to say that satire can't itself be used to communicate an alternative morality?

I'm glad that I got splits on the minimalism and abstract questions since, at least without reading whatever it is we're talking about, I don't really care about those areas. I suppose the rest are "correct", but I'm not fond of the dichotomies presented.
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MB
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« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2019, 01:34:17 am »

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Laki
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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2019, 12:33:23 pm »

http://www.dichotomytests.com/results.html?id=3&f=30&o=55&t=75&s=-30&e=-15&a=-75&p=20
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True Federalist
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« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2019, 09:50:32 pm »

http://www.dichotomytests.com/results.html?id=3&f=0&o=15&t=-40&s=-10&e=5&a=-45&p=15

I think the biases of the test creator show thru my results. They say I prefer celebratory liter just because I strongly disagreed with idea that great literature must be dark and angsty. It can be, but it need not be. That said, I suppose I do prefer less experimental prose forms, but that's mainly because most experiments fail to be entertaining or interesting except to those seeking novelty for its own sake. For example, I think that Faulkner chose the right title for his novel The Sound and The Fury, but unlike most people I think that the idiot who told that tale was Faulkner himself, not the character Benjy. Stream of consciousness was already stale and overused as an idea by the time that novel was written, and his take on it was entirely unentertaining. That form is best used sparingly in my opinion.
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