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  Department of External Affairs: May 2010 Foreign Policy Review
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Author Topic: Department of External Affairs: May 2010 Foreign Policy Review  (Read 6990 times)
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Hashemite
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« on: March 12, 2010, 04:39:06 pm »
« edited: May 03, 2010, 07:43:45 pm by Orleanser »



Welcome to the Department of External Affairs
Bienvenue au ministère des Affaires extérieures
Bienvenido al Departamento de Asuntos Exteriores
Willkommen in der Abteilung für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten
Bem-vindo ao Departamento de Assuntos Externos
Welkom bij het ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken
Zapraszamy do Departamentu Spraw Zagranicznych
ברוכים הבאים ל המחלקה לקשרי חוץ
مرحبا بكم في وزارة الشؤون الخارجية
Добро пожаловать в министерство иностранных дел*


Welcome to the DoEA. My name is Hashemite, and I'll be your Secretary of External Affairs.

Agenda
1. Foreign Policy Review
2. Preparation for GTO Summit
3. Work with Senate and Cabinet on the foreign aid budget


* The DoEA does not take responsibility for unfortunate errors in translation. Blame Google.
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Purple State
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2010, 05:29:23 pm »

Good effort on the Hebrew.
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AndrewTX
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2010, 05:31:40 pm »

Welcome back to the office!
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2010, 11:07:35 pm »


It is noted and appreciated Smiley
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Purple State
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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2010, 12:00:07 am »

Does the DoEA or President have any comments or thoughts on the recent proposal for a GTO Monetary Fund?

I ask this as GM, not as a citizen.
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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2010, 07:36:13 am »

Does the DoEA or President have any comments or thoughts on the recent proposal for a GTO Monetary Fund?

I ask this as GM, not as a citizen.

I hope to discuss it with the President and Cabinet at our first meeting, if one is held soon. It has some interest to me, but I wouldn't want the GTO Monetary Fund becoming firstly a new IMF and secondly, as Brazil and India think, an obstruction by the wealthy nations to economic growth in those nations. I'm not convinced that when economies are working well or reasonably well, that any supranational organization should be regulating other nation's economies.
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k-onmmunist
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« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2010, 07:47:22 am »

Do us proud Smiley
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« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2010, 07:21:45 pm »

Sorry for not getting on with this earlier. A new foreign policy review will begin soon, and I hope to begin working with willing Senators (nudge nudge) on figuring out the foreign aid budget.
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« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2010, 07:25:39 am »

Sorry for not getting on with this earlier. A new foreign policy review will begin soon, and I hope to begin working with willing Senators (nudge nudge) on figuring out the foreign aid budget.

<Raises hand to volunteer>
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« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2010, 07:43:24 am »

Communiqué

Atlasia and the Department of External Affairs offer their full condolences to the people of Poland and especially those affected personally by the tragic air crash.
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2010, 04:45:32 pm »

News Flash

The Department of External Affairs has learned of the talks for the formation of a multilateral group between various South American nations. The DoEA welcomes the creation of this new organization, because we believe the the continued economic, social and political development of the South American continent which includes emerging superpowers such as Brazil, do not require the direct intervention of Atlasia. Atlasia fully supports the political independence of all nations in matters of foreign policy or economic development.

Atlasia condemns the death of an unnamed national in the West Bank and we will cooperate with security forces in the West Bank in this affair. We continue to urge Atlasians not to travel to the Palestinian Territories.

The Department of External Affairs will create a Foreign Aid Roundtable with Senators and citizens on the issue of foreign aid and foreign aid budget in the coming days.
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« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2010, 10:17:57 am »

Department of External Affairs: May 2010 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: The Americas

Antigua and Barbuda: Normal
Argentina: Normal
Bahamas: Normal
Barbados: Normal
Belize: Normal
Bolivia: Normal, though we oppose any secessionist movements in Santa Cruz province and other eastern areas of the country.
Brazil: Normal
Canada: Normal
Chile: Normal. Atlasia has provided relief funds following the recent earthquake.
Colombia: Normal, though we have concerns over corruption, illegal narcotics and the FARC.
Costa Rica: Normal
Cuba: Normal. Atlasian policy regarding Cuba is currently F.L. 18-6, Cuban Relations Act, and we have no intentions to change the policy.
Dominica: Normal
Dominican Republic: Normal
Ecuador: Normal
El Salvador: Normal
Grenada: Normal
Guatemala: Normal
Guyana: Normal
Haiti: Normal, though we have concerns regarding corruption and political instability. Atlasia has provided aid and relief funds following the recent earthquake.
Honduras: Normal. Atlasia will work with the newly-elected President to restore full democratic rule and transparency in Honduras, but we will impose military sanctions in the event of a military coup or other disturbance to democratic rule.
Jamaica: Normal
Mexico: Normal, though we have serious concerns about the drug warlords conflict.
Nicaragua: Normal, though we have some minor concerns.
Panama: Normal
Paraguay: Normal
Peru: Normal
Saint Kitts and Nevis: Normal
Saint Lucia: Normal
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Normal
Suriname: Normal
Trinidad and Tobago: Normal
Uruguay: Normal
Venezuela: Normal

DoEA Policy: Europe

Albania: Normal, but we have concerns with corruption, fraud and illegal drug trafficking. Atlasia will oppose NATO membership until these concerns are resolved. However, we are open to economic aid and development.
Andorra: Normal
Armenia: Current democratic trends in Armenia is seen as positive by the Atlasian government. Yet, partial military restrictions should be put in place due to concerns regarding Nagorno-Karabakh and instability in the region. We urge for a UN mediation of the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh.
Austria: Normal
Azerbaijan: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held, civil liberties respected and transparency is restored.
Belarus: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held and civil liberties respected.
Belgium: Normal, though we have concerns about internal divisions and the risk of secession by Flanders.
Bosnia & Herzegovina: Normal. Atlasia welcomes the apparent political stability and peaceful ethnic relations.
Bulgaria: Normal
Croatia: Normal
Czech Republic: Normal
Denmark: Normal
Estonia: Normal
Finland: Normal
France: Normal
Georgia: Normal, though we have concerns over civil liberties and notably about the status of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The DoEA reserves the right to military restrictions if we feel that it is needed in view of current events in the country or the Caucasus.
Germany: Normal
Greece: Normal, though we have concerns about the current economic situation.
Hungary: Normal
Iceland: Normal
Ireland: Normal
Italy: Normal, though we have concerns about corruption.
Kosovo: Normal
Latvia: Normal
Liechtenstein: Normal although we call for a complete transition to democracy and full transparency in banking.
Lithuania: Normal
Luxembourg: Normal
Macedonia: Normal, although we have concerns about corruption, ethnic minorities and relations with Greece.
Moldova: Normal. Atlasia is pleased overall with democratic evolution in Moldova, though we have serious concerns about corruption, political instability, drug trafficking and the Transnistria issue.
Monaco: Normal
Montenegro: Normal
Netherlands: Normal
Norway: Normal
Poland: Normal
Portugal: Normal
Romania: Normal
Russia: Partial military and economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about democracy, civil liberties, press freedom and the situation in Chechnya and the Russian Caucasus.
San Marino: Normal
Serbia: Normal
Slovakia: Normal, though we have some concerns about worrying nationalist trends in the country and their negative effect on internal and external ethnic relations.
Slovenia: Normal
Sweden: Normal
Switzerland: Normal
Turkey: Normal, although concerns remain about treatment of Kurds
Ukraine: Normal, but we have concerns regarding current political stability, corruption, and various other problems
United Kingdom: Normal
Vatican City: Normal
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« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2010, 12:36:31 pm »

Good work Hashemite.  Any changes to my final FPR?
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« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2010, 05:25:42 pm »

Transcript of SoEA Hashemite's speech to the GTO Assembly in Paris, France :: April 23, 2010

Part one.


Fellow delegates, fellow Ministers of Foreign Affairs, your Excellencies;

The year 2010 is a crucial year in world affairs, and each nation has a duty and responsibility to the world community and no nation should shriek away from the world stage. We live in a world of modern technology enabling instant intercontinental communications, we live in a world where almost no country is isolated in the world. One hundred years ago, nations could afford to adopt an isolationist policy and keep away from world affairs. But today, when the world is interconnected and interdependent, no nation can afford an isolationist policy. The member nations of this organization have held it against Atlasia in the past to be unresponsive to foreign events and stoic in the face of tragedy, grief or even joy. I come to you today to say that Atlasia shall no longer shriek from its duty to the world. We have a responsibility, as one of the world's most populous and economically strongest nation, to play an active role on the world stage. In my eyes, however, being an economic powerhouse does not allow Atlasia to lead an arrogant and unilateral foreign policy. On the contrary, it allows and even compels Atlasia to lead an active policy of cooperation with the nations of the world. Such a style has not always been followed by Atlasia, but let it be known that I intend to revamp Atlasia's policy and its image in the world.

The cornerstone of our new policy is the respect for the sovereignty of other nations, a committment to international development and reducing poverty and hunger, and finally a committment to the promotion of foreign relations founded in the values of respect, trust, cooperation and peace. By respecting the sovereignty of nations, we believe that each nation has the right to lead the internal policies it wishes or to elect the parties it wishes. It also means that Atlasia has no right at intervening in a nation's internal or even external policy. However, respect for national sovereignty does not allow a nation to act with impunity within its borders, nor does it allow a nation to violate the sovereignty of another nation. The promotion of democratic values, of civil liberties and fundamental human rights remain the cornerstone of our policy, but the promotion of democratic values does not allow Atlasia the right to act arrogantly to impose its views on foreign nations. By a committment to international development and reducing poverty and hunger, Atlasia shows its determination to strive towards achieving the UN's Millenium Development Goals laid out in 2000. In 2010, it is not acceptable that millions of children around the world suffer from malnutrition while others live a life of unrestrained luxury and graft. It is no longer acceptable that human beings live and work in squalid conditions. These are fundamental problems and issues and they are issues that should play a fundamental role in defining one's foreign policy. Finally, through our committment to the promotion of foreign relations founded in the values of respect, trust, cooperation and peace, Atlasia will strive for peace in the world. Peace is not an idealist value, because it is possible and history has shown that it is indeed possible. We must strive as a global community to foster relations between states that are founded in the respect of national sovereignty, trust in a nation's committments and cooperation between states to prevent war and promote peace. Some critics may say that Atlasia's foreign policy is worthlessly idealistic. I contend that it is not. Some may say that it is weak and shrieks away from addressing real problems. I say that it is not. We remain committed to democratic values, and we will strongly oppose any government which tramples on fundamental rights, and oppose any state which acts in impunity or in flagrant disrespect of another states' right to self-determination and sovereignty.

There is more to just words and the promotion of values. In politics and international relations, actions matter, often they matter more than the words attached to them. I know very well that our foreign partners demand from us not just empty words, but actions to back up those words. What are Atlasia's actions?

I have started a full review of our foreign policy, with all nations, to lay out clearly and honestly our views on world issues and our responses to the actions of various states or our responses to various geopolitical events. I have started a full review of our foreign aid committments, working with other members of the federal government of Atlasia. When completed, it should lay out clearly our revised committments and the foreign aid funds going to the various nations in need. I am determined as Secretary of External Affairs to lead an active foreign policy, one which will strive to work towards peaceful relations between nations and negotiation over conflict. In the coming days and weeks, I intend to visit the major capitals of the world to meet with world leaders and discuss the pressing issues of the day.

---

A fundamental principle of Atlasia's foreign policy is the respect for the political and economic values of fellow member states. We are a community of allies who hold dear basic values such as democracy, human rights, civil liberties and respect for each others' sovereignty. Yet, the members of this state represent a plethora of languages, cultures, ethics and principles. The member states diverge on matters of state such as internal policies, financial policies or foreign policy. Such disagreements and diverging views are to be welcomed and encouraged in a free association such as ours. This means that different values of conducting policies in regards to internal issues are to be respected.

The GTO Monetary Fund which has been proposed by several member states presents an interesting idea. The financial stability of nations, to prevent inflation, deflation, recession or other economic events; is key to democracy and to the development of strong powers. A vast majority of the member nations of the GTO have mature or growing economies which are stable, though still vulnerable to the economic cycle. The GTO Monetary Fund, if created, should serve as a common shield against the fallout of the next financial crisis.

Yet, the GTO Monetary Fund, if created, should not act as a second IMF. Furthermore, the GTO Monetary Fund should not punish nations for having diverging views in regards to economic policy in the aim of development. Several nations see the need for running deficit spending to finance worthwhile projects of development. It would be wrong and against the principles of the GTO for the structure to punish countries for such actions. The GTO Monetary Fund should not be a block on emerging economies, which, as I said previously, have differing methods of spending than other nations. Lastly, the GTO Monetary Fund should not be an ideological body which pushes forward a dominant school of thought. The GTO was not created to espouse any ideology or school of political or economic thought. The bottom line on the issue is that it is a complex one that merits discussion, a discussion which Atlasia will participate in. It is only after reasoned discussion that one should state its approval or disapproval of the idea. In the meantime, one should only voice its thoughts, ideas or even misgivings about the proposed structure.

A speech is not enough for me to address the pressing issues, but it is enough to address the basic points which Atlasia wishes to put forward.

This day should signal a new dawn in Atlasian foreign policy, one based in mutual cooperation, understanding and respect; and one founded in the principles that all humans enjoy basic rights and liberties. I want to make it clear, to all nations, those in this room and those not, that Atlasia is a nation which supports respectful and meaningful cooperation between nation-states, but that Atlasia is also a nation which values democracy and civil liberties. Atlasia is a friend, ally, and partner of any democratic nation in the world. Atlasia is a supporter of all emerging nations in the world which try to find their way into the concert of nations and try to find their way in a globalized society. Atlasia is a supporter of all those who fight for better living conditions, basic human rights, self-determination and democratic governance. The new decade should signal a shift in the attitudes of nation-states towards each other but also towards issues such as poverty, hunger, globalization or development, and Atlasia should and will be a leader of a new, more modern, way of thinking.

Thank you all for your time
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« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2010, 08:08:59 pm »

Purple heart

I'll put up a story in a bit.
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« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2010, 08:05:52 pm »
« Edited: May 12, 2010, 06:33:13 pm by Orleanser »

Department of External Affairs: May 2010 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: Africa

Algeria: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Angola: Normal, though we are concerned by corruption and violence in various regions, such as Cabinda.
Benin: Normal
Botswana: Normal
Burkina Faso: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and certain political freedoms.
Burundi: Normal, though we are still concerned about ethnic violence, corruption and certain political freedoms.
Cameroon: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Cape Verde: Normal
Central African Republic: Partial military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms and certain civil liberties.
Chad: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms, certain civil liberties and the political situation.
Comoros: Normal, though we are concerned by the current political situation
Congo: Partial military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the massive corruption and lack of political freedoms.
Cote d’Ivoire: Partial military and partial economic restrictions until political issues have been resolved and free elections held as soon as possible.
Democratic Republic of the Congo: Full military and economic restrictions because of serious concerns about the political situation, continued violence, basic rights, corruption and treatment of women.
Djibouti: Djibouti is a dictatorship. Full military and partial economic restrictions
Egypt: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Equatorial Guinea: Full military and economic restrictions
Eritrea: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns about the current situation, civil liberties and illegal weapons trading with Somalia.
Ethiopia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have concerns about political freedoms, internal violence and relations with Somalia.
Gabon: Partial military and partial economic restrictions until democratic institutions are respected and civil liberties recognized.
Gambia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Ghana: Normal
Guinea: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruptions. We support a return to civilian government.
Guinea-Bissau: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Kenya: Normal
Lesotho: Normal
Liberia: Normal
Libya: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Madagascar: Normal, though we are concerned by corruption and political instability.
Malawi: Normal
Mali: Normal
Mauritania: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Mauritius: Normal
Morocco: Normal, though we are concerned about certain political freedoms. On the matter of Western Sahara, we demand immediate negotiations concerning the status of Western Sahara, and the failure of Morocco to engage into talks will results in recognition of Sahrawi independence.
Mozambique: Normal
Namibia: Normal
Niger: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms and basic rights.
Nigeria: Partial military and no economic restrictions. There needs to be serious political reform and we are also worried about violence in the Niger Delta and the situation in the north.
Rwanda: Normal, though we have concerns pertaining to freedom of the press and politics.
Sao Tome and Principe: Normal
Senegal: Normal
Seychelles: Normal
Sierra Leone: Normal
Somalia: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns regarding piracy And continued violence.
Somaliland: Normal. We strongly appreciate the government's co-operation with Atlasia in regards to piracy.
South Africa: Normal, though we have concerns over corruption and their response to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
Sudan: Full military and economic restrictions. We strongly condemn the situation in Darfur.
Swaziland: Full military and economic restrictions
Tanzania: Normal
Togo: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Tunisia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Uganda: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the political situation, human rights and corruption.
Zambia: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Zimbabwe: Full military and economic restrictions
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« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2010, 01:04:55 pm »


I would argue that, given the way Chavez has behaved, at least partial restrictions should be put in place, especially militarily.
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« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2010, 02:19:37 pm »


I would argue that, given the way Chavez has behaved, at least partial restrictions should be put in place, especially militarily.

Chavez is, for all intents and purposes, gone from this game.
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« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2010, 09:58:38 pm »


I would argue that, given the way Chavez has behaved, at least partial restrictions should be put in place, especially militarily.

Chavez is, for all intents and purposes, gone from this game.

Why?
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« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2010, 10:50:01 pm »


I would argue that, given the way Chavez has behaved, at least partial restrictions should be put in place, especially militarily.

Chavez is, for all intents and purposes, gone from this game.

Why?

After the war with Colombia, Chavez was replaced by the then-VP of Venezuela. Chavez is no longer in power.
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« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2010, 12:16:53 pm »

Great work Mr. SOEA.  I am so proud to be sandwiches between your two terms in the postion Wink
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« Reply #21 on: May 03, 2010, 04:47:31 pm »
« Edited: May 04, 2010, 08:45:13 pm by Orleanser »

Department of External Affairs: May 2010 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: Asia and Oceania

Afghanistan: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption, drugs, women's right and other issues.
Australia: Normal
Bahrain: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy. The DoEA reserves the right to partial military or economic restrictions if we feel that it is needed.
Bangladesh: Normal
Bhutan: Normal
Brunei: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Burma (Myanmar)Sad Full restrictions. We urge for a full transfer to democracy, and the respect for civil liberties and basic political freedoms.
Cambodia: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and civil liberties.
China: Partial military restrictions and no economic restrictions, though we are very concerned over human rights, and political liberties. We realize that China is a major economic partner and full economic restrictions would be counter-productive to the Atlasian and global economy.
East Timor: Normal
Federated States of Micronesia: Normal
Fiji: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
India: Normal
Indonesia: Normal
Iran: Full military and economic restrictions will remain in place until the Iranian regime makes full, honest and lasting overtures to democracy.
Iraq: Normal, though we have major concerns about corruption and other issues.
Israel: Normal. We support an immediate end to the expansion and construction of settlements in the West Bank, and condemn Israeli attacks in Gaza, the West Bank and parts of Lebanon.
Japan: Normal
Jordan: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Kazakhstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We want a full transfer to democracy.
Kiribati: Normal
Kuwait: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy. The DoEA reserves the right to partial military restrictions if we feel that it is needed.
Kyrgyzstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We hope that the new government will be able to achieve the creation of a democratic state which respects civil liberties.
Laos: Normal, though we have concerns about human rights and basic freedoms.
Lebanon: Normal, but we have concerns about Hezbollah's role as a political and paramilitary (terrorist) organization.
Malaysia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Maldives: Normal
Marshall Islands: Normal
Mongolia: Normal
Nauru: Normal
Nepal: Normal
New Zealand: Normal
North Korea: Full military and economic restrictions
Oman: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Pakistan: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption, security and other issues.
Palau: Normal
Palestine: Normal, though we are gravely concerned by the current political situation. Atlasia supports a two-state solution and would like a democratic and independent state of Palestine in the near future.
Papua New Guinea: Normal
Philippines: Normal
Qatar: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy. The DoEA reserves the right to partial military restrictions if we feel that it is needed.
Samoa: Normal
Saudi Arabia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about the human rights situation and urge the government to make major democratic reforms.
Singapore: Normal, though we would like a true democracy.
Solomon Islands: Normal
South Korea: Normal
Sri Lanka: Normal, though we are concerned about a few issues. We urge the government to build a modern, peaceful, democratic and multiethnic state with peaceful ethnic relations in the wake of the end of the civil war.
Syria: Full military and economic restrictions
Tajikistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Thailand: Normal, though we are keeping a close eye on the political situation and we will re-evalute the Free Trade Act with Thailand if need be.
Tonga: Normal
Turkmenistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Tuvalu: Normal
United Arab Emirates: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about workers rights and political freedoms.
Uzbekistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Vanuatu: Normal
Vietnam: Normal
Yemen: Normal, though we are concerned about civil liberties, regional strife and corruption.

I present the full FPR to the Senate and ask a Senator to assume sponsorship of this bill and urge the Senate to approve it, as per the terms of F.L. 32-18: Amendment to the SoEA Role Codification Act.

x Hashemite, SoEA
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« Reply #22 on: May 03, 2010, 05:45:43 pm »

After the war with Colombia, Chavez was replaced by the then-VP of Venezuela. Chavez is no longer in power.

My bad Tongue  I withdraw my complaint, then.
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« Reply #23 on: May 03, 2010, 07:41:36 pm »
« Edited: May 12, 2010, 08:44:07 pm by Orleanser »

Department of External Affairs: May 2010 Foreign Aid Review

Overview

As per the estimate of the Office of the GM, Atlasia allocates $10 billion (10,000,000,000) to foreign aid, humanitarian special assistance, international assistance and development for the present fiscal year. This is around 0.07% of our GDP.

The SoEA assumes that funds allocated by the Senate for the Chilean and Haitian earthquake relief are not taken entirely from the annual foreign aid budget of the DoEA, and that some of the actual money allocated for these efforts are either borrowed by the Atlasian government or taken from non-DoEA budgetary matters.

Atlasia is committed to international development and foreign aid in the goal of meeting the UN's Millenium Development Goals by 2015 at the earliest. We are also committed to democratic values and basic human rights, and we believe that it is wrong for Atlasia to allocated federal government money for aid and development projects run by or supervised by governments that do not adhere to these values.


Details

Including exceptional aid to Chile and counting Haiti's budget at the regular amount, $8,817,000,000 is allocated to individual countries as foreign aid. This number is $8,772,000,000 excluding Chile.

Special Considerations

Haiti earthquake relief: $100,000,000 allocated as per the Emergency Initiative for Haiti Earthquake Relief Act.
Chile earthquake relief: $45,000,000 allocated as per the Emergency Initiative for Chile Earthquake Relief Act.


DoEA Foreign Aid: The Americas

Belize: $30,000,000
Bolivia: $100,000,000
Chile: $45,000,000 allocated as per the Emergency Initiative for Chile Earthquake Relief Act. There are no funds allocated for regular foreign aid to Chile.
Colombia: $125,000,000
Dominican Republic: $10,000,000
Ecuador: $55,000,000
El Salvador: $70,000,000
Guatemala: $65,000,000
Haiti: $100,000,000 allocated as per the Emergency Initiative for Haiti Earthquake Relief Act. The regular foreign aid for Haiti would be $200,000,000.
Honduras: $30,000,000
Nicaragua: $60,000,000
Peru: $175,000,000
Venezuela: $15,000,000 (reconstruction funds)


DoEA Foreign Aid: Europe

Albania: $25,000,000
Armenia: $60,000,000
Azerbaijan: Governmental foreign aid to Azerbaijan is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Bosnia & Herzegovina: $40,000,000
Georgia: $60,000,000
Kosovo: $50,000,000
Moldova: $40,000,000
Turkey: $12,000,000
Ukraine: $60,000,000


DoEA Foreign Aid: Africa

Angola: $100,000,000
Burkina Faso: $40,000,000
Burundi: $35,000,000
Chad: $15,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to Chad is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Democratic Republic of the Congo: $30,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to the DRC is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Egypt: $40,000,000
Eritrea: $3,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to Eritrea is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Ethiopia: $250,000,000
Ghana: $95,000,000
Kenya: $300,000,000
Lesotho: $50,000,000
Liberia: $260,000,000
Malawi: $75,000,000
Mali: $300,000,000
Mauritania: $150,000,000
Mauritius: Normal
Morocco: $40,000,000
Mozambique: $190,000,000
Namibia: $80,000,000
Niger: $110,000,000
Nigeria: $195,000,000
Rwanda: $50,000,000
Senegal: $35,000,000
Sierra Leone: $135,000,000
South Africa: $290,000,000
Sudan: $40,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to Sudan is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections, recognition of basic human rights and a solution to the Darfur conflict.
Tanzania: $60,000,000
Uganda: $50,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to Uganda is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Zambia: $200,000,000
Zimbabwe: $100,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to Zimbabwe is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.


DoEA Foreign Aid: Asia and Oceania

Afghanistan: $2,750,000,000
Bangladesh: $150,000,000
Cambodia: $70,000,000
India: $65,000,000
Indonesia: $97,000,000
Iraq: $175,000,000
Jordan: $95,000,000
Kazakhstan: $30,000,000. Full governmental foreign aid to Kazakhstan is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Nepal: $45,000,000
Pakistan: $150,000,000
Palestine: $150,000,000
Philippines: $130,000,000
Sri Lanka: $95,000,000
Tajikistan: $30,000,000
Uzbekistan: Governmental foreign aid to Uzbekistan is conditional on major democratic reforms in the country, including free elections and recognition of basic human rights.
Yemen: $50,000,000


DoEA Foreign Aid: Multilateral Development

African Development Bank: $400,000,000
Asian Development Bank: $200,000,000
BancoSur / Bank of the South: $150,000,000
Caribbean Development Bank: $130,000,000
GTO: $393,000,000


'OOC' note: I don't know jack about budgetary stuff and all that stuff, which is why I was hoping for some assistance. Seeing how our dear Senate doesn't care much about applying legislation, I did this alone using US government data and other information. If you're not happy, then whine as long as you want, because you all had your chance to help out with this at the failed roundtable. Tough luck. And nobody comes whining about why such and such country got this much and this other place didn't. There.

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Hashemite
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« Reply #24 on: May 04, 2010, 03:24:37 pm »

No comments? Sad
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